legal-affairs

Report: Former Challenger to Admit He Took Payment From Brady Campaign
Former challenger will plead guilty to hiding $90,000 payment

An attorney for Rep. Robert Brady, D-Pa., disputed that Brady’s campaign paid off an opponent to drop out of their 2012 race. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Report: Navy Reviewing Murphy's Disclosure of Affair
Pennsylvania congressman is also an officer in the Navy Reserve

Rep. Tim Murphy, R-Pa., left, admitted to an extramarital affair last week. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The U.S. Navy is reviewing Pennsylvania Rep. Tim Murphy’s admission last week of having an extramarital affair.

A Navy spokesperson confirmed to the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette that a review is underway for Murphy, a commander the Navy Reserve.

Weiner’s Lawyers Say Teen Sexting Partner Wanted to Influence Election
Disgraced former congressman to be sentenced Sept. 25

Former Democratic Rep. Anthony Weiner exits federal court in Manhattan after pleading guilty in his sexting case in May. (Eduardo Munoz Alvarez/Getty Images file photo)

Lawyers for disgraced former Rep. Anthony Weiner claim that the teenage girl to whom he sent explicit messages wanted to influence the 2016 presidential election.

Weiner’s lawyers said that Weiner never sought out teenage girls, The Associated Press reported. But they admitted that Weiner’s acts were “born of deep sickness.”

Thanks to Bannon, White House Can't Shake Comey Firing
Former FBI boss, Hillary Clinton's book distract from taxes, hurricane response

Then-FBI Director JAmes Comey testifying in from of a Senate panel in 2015. The Trump White House cannot shake questions about his firing. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Updated 6:23 p.m. | Former White House chief strategist Steve Bannon’s explosive comments about the firing of former FBI Director James B. Comey is pulling administration officials away from their intended messaging about two federal hurricane responses and a quest for bipartisan tax legislation.

White House officials set up a week featuring a series of high-level meetings, including several involving President Donald Trump and key lawmakers, meant to portray him and his senior team as aggressively working with members of both parties on issues such as revisions to the tax code, racial tensions, and other matters.

Senators Could Lose ‘Blue Slip’ Input on Circuit Judges
President would have less reason to consult with lawmakers

Senate Judiciary Chairman Charles E. Grassley has signaled he might end a tradition that gives senators a de facto veto power over nominees to federal appeals courts. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

A looming showdown over a Senate tradition could strip senators of a de facto veto power over nominees to federal appeals courts — and give President Donald Trump less reason to consult with senators about which judges should be appointed.

The Judiciary Committee’s “blue slip” process has required senators to return a blue slip of paper before the committee schedules hearings and markups of nominees for federal judgeships from their home states. No slip, no hearing. That has made it essential for the White House to get a senator’s buy-in on a nomination.

Donald Trump Jr. Talks to Senate Investigators
But details beyond opening statement remain private for now

Reporters hold up their smart phones to try to catch a photo of Donald Trump Jr., as he returns to a meeting with the Senate Judiciary staff on Thursday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Donald Trump Jr. spent about five hours Thursday answering questions from Senate Judiciary Committee staff about a meeting he set up between his father’s presidential campaign and a Russian lawyer, but the details beyond his opening statement remain private for now.

Several senators attended the closed-door, voluntary interview with the president’s son, part of the committee’s probe into possible Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election. Only Senate staffers asked questions, however, and the committee will have to vote at a later time on whether to make the transcript public.

Menendez Trial Opens: Prosecutors Say He ‘Sold His Office’
Menendez attorney says government has no evidence he took bribes

Sens. Bob Menendez, D-N.J., is currently facing a corruption trial. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Prosecutors opened the corruption trial of New Jersey Sen. Robert Menendez saying he “sold his office for a lifestyle he couldn’t afford” to achieve favors for campaign donor Salomon Melgen. 

Menendez is accused of using his influence as a senator to assist the Florida opthamologist in securing visas for one of Melgen's girlfriends and her sister from the Dominican Republic. 

Trump Tweet Contradicts Legal Rationale for DACA Termination
President says he will ‘revisit’ matter if Congress fails to act

Immigration rights demonstrators prepare Tuesday to march from the White House to the Trump International Hotel and the Justice Department to oppose President Donald Trump's decision to end the DACA program for "Dreamers." (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

President Donald Trump appeared to throw a lifeline Tuesday night to nearly 1 million undocumented immigrants, just hours after signaling his administration planned to deport them.

Trump took to Twitter Tuesday night and appeared to contradict himself and Attorney General Jeff Sessions by signaling he might sign an order providing protection to those 800,000 people if Congress fails to pass a bill addressing their presence in the U.S.

Capitol Ink | Hurricane DACA

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Trump Ends DACA Immigration Program — With a Twist
President calls on members to help him find a legislative fix

Immigration rights activists rally in Dupont Circle in Washington before their May Day march to the White House to voice opposition to President Donald Trump's immigration policies. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Updated 11:24 a.m. President Donald Trump, answering pleas from his base but again breaking with many congressional Republicans, on Tuesday ended Barack Obama’s program that shielded from deportation individuals who came to the United States with their parents before their 16th birthday.

“The policy was implemented unilaterally,” Attorney General Jeff Sessions said Tuesday while making the formal announcement, referring to then-President Barack Obama implementing the program via an executive order. Sessions called the Obama-era program “unconstitutional.”