leadership

Trump Administration Plans to Roll Out Tax Plan Next Week
Unveiling would join government shutdown threat and health care re-try on week’s docket

President Donald Trump delivers his address to a joint session of Congress on Feb. 28. He plans to roll out his long-promised tax reform plan next week. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

By JOHN T. BENNETT and LINDSEY McPHERSON, CQ Roll Call

A government shutdown deadline, maybe a second try at pushing a health care overhaul bill through the House, an image-focused president approaching his 100th day. And, now, a White House tax reform plan.

Analysis: Trump’s Bold Talk Replaced by ‘See What Happens’ Stoicism
From health care to North Korea to Russia, president now strikes a wait-and-see tone

NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg and U.S. President Donald Trump hold a news conference in the East Room of the White House April 12, 2017 in Washington, DC. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

Donald Trump is taking a wait-and-see approach more and more often, following a 2016 campaign that espoused bold promises and exuded confidence.

Take his comments Thursday afternoon about an effort among White House officials and congressional Republicans to try again at repealing and replacing former President Barack Obama’s 2010 health care law.

Government Shutdown Prevention on Republicans, Democrats Say
Leaders urge members to oppose stopgap measure if no bipartisan agreement is reached

Appropriations Committee ranking member Nita Lowey, D-N.Y., told House Democrats its unlikely a bipartisan agreement on funding the government will be ready by the April 28 deadline. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

House Democrats are putting the onus on Republicans to prevent a government shutdown.

It’s unlikely a bipartisan deal could be reached in time to meet the April 28 funding deadline, and unless an agreement is in place Democrats should vote-against a short-term stopgap measure, Democratic leaders said Thursday.

Government Funding or Health Bill? ‘I Want to Get Both,’ Trump Says
President’s whim will test often-fractious House GOP caucus

U.S. President Donald Trump welcome’s Italy Prime Minister Paolo Gentiloni after he arrived at the West Wing of the White House, on April 20, 2017 in Washington, DC. (Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

President Donald Trump turned up the heat on congressional Republicans Thursday, saying he wants them to send him two high-stakes bills next week: one to keep the government open and another to overhaul the health care system.

“I want to get both,” Trump said during a joint press conference with his Italian counterpart.

Take Five: Lou Correa
California Democrat says ‘downtime is nonexistent’ in this Congress

California Rep. Lou Correa says people tell him he came to Congress at the wrong time. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Freshman Rep. Lou Correa, 59, a California Democrat, talks about advice he received from Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, sleeping in his office, and making friends in Congress.

Q: What has surprised you about Congress so far?

Schumer Joins Calls for President to Release Tax Returns
Minority Leader: Failure to disclose makes passing tax reform ‘much harder’

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer says President Trump could wreck a major campaign pledge, a package of tax code changes and rate cuts, if he keeps his own returns secret. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

The top Senate Democrat on Tuesday joined calls for President Donald Trump to release his tax returns, warning that a failure to do so could sink what was a major campaign promise.

Should the president opt to continue keeping his full personal financial picture secret, it would make any package of tax code changes and rate cuts “much harder to pass,” said Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer, D-N.Y.

Rising Stars 2017: Hill Staffers
Two experienced hands make the list

Two Capitol Hill staffers are among CQ Roll Call’s Rising Stars of 2017. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Over the course of this week, CQ Roll Call is taking a look at 17 Rising Stars of 2017 — people who will now wield power and influence in a Washington that has been turned upside down by the presidency of Donald Trump.

Some of the names are familiar, others have recently burst on the scene. They include members of Congress, congressional and administration staffers, and advocates.

Poll: Ryan Is Even Less Popular Than Trump
Only 29 percent of Americans approve of speaker’s performance

House Speaker Paul D. Ryan holds a lower job approval rating than President Donald Trump, according to a Pew Research Center study. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

President Donald Trump is very unpopular, but an even smaller percentage of Americans approves of the job House Speaker Paul D. Ryan is doing, a new poll shows.

The Pew Research Center survey released Monday shows that just 29 percent of Americans approve of Ryan’s performance. In contrast, 39 percent approve of Trump, whose approval ratings rank among the lowest of recent presidents at this point in their terms.

Funding Deadline Tests GOP Strategy
Republicans hoped for more under Trump, but still need Democrats’ help

From left, Office of Management and Budget Director Mick Mulvaney, House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, President Donald Trump and House Speaker Paul D. Ryan meet for a working lunch at the White House on March 1. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images file photo)

When Republicans kicked the fiscal 2017 spending deadline into April last December, House Speaker Paul D. Ryan said they’d rather negotiate with incoming GOP President Donald Trump than the outgoing Democratic one.

But now, congressional Republicans are talking about largely ignoring requests from the White House as they negotiate with Democrats over a spending bill to take the government off autopilot for the remaining five months of the fiscal year.

Rising Stars 2017: Members of Congress
Four lawmakers to watch

CQ Roll Call’s Rising Stars of 2017 include four members of Congress. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Washington has been turned upside down by the presidency of Donald Trump, but there are many in this city who will now wield power and influence either through their wits, careful planning or just dumb luck. 

CQ Roll Call has identified 17 of these people to watch in 2017. Some of the names are familiar, others have recently burst on the scene.