kevin-mccarthy

Trump Might Be Open to Earlier Freeze of Medicaid Expansion
Spokesman says president willing to listen to ideas on health plan

Trump, gesturing at Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, is open to changes to the House health care bill. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

The White House appeared Friday to not rule out altering a Republican-crafted health care overhaul measure by accelerating a Medicaid expansion roll back, a move that could garner more conservative votes, although it could jeopardize support from GOP moderates and senators from states who have used the program to cover the uninsured.

The bill, which has been approved by two key House committees, would nix the 2010 health law’s expansion of the entitlement program in 2020. That’s not soon enough for many House conservatives, and a reason why the White House and GOP leaders appear to lack the 218 votes needed to send the overhaul measure to the Senate.

Sessions Recuses Himself From Russia Investigation
AG’s move follows Republican recusal calls, Democrats say he should resign

Attorney General Jeff Sessions takes questions during a news conference on Thursday after he announced he would recuse himself from investigations into ties between President Donald Trump’s campaign and Russian entities. (Win McNamee/Getty Images)

Updated 5:03 p.m. | Attorney General Jeff Sessions will recuse himself from any investigation into ties between President Donald Trump’s campaign and Russian officials, he said Thursday.

The attorney general had been dogged all day by calls from some Republicans to step aside from any inquiry — and from Democrats for him to resign — following reports that he had met with Russia’s ambassador to the U.S. last year, despite saying he had not in his confirmation hearings.

Tennessee, Texas Stand Out for Strengthened Hill Sway
In Roll Call’s Clout Index for this Congress, California delegation’s longtime hold on top spot is threatened

Party affiliation and longevity have helped propel members of the Tennessee delegation such as Sen. Bob Corker into positions that convey authority and power, Hawkings writes. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

No state in this decade has seen a more meaningful boost than Tennessee in institutionalized congressional influence.

Only eight states, all with much bigger delegations because they’re much more populous, have more overt sway at the Capitol this year. That is one of several notable findings from the new Roll Call Clout Index, which the newspaper uses to take a quantifiable measurement of every state’s potential for power at the start of each new Congress.  

Ryan Lays Out Ambitious 200-Day Congressional Agenda
Health care and tax overhauls slated to be done by August per GOP plan

Rep. Chris Collins, R-N.Y., does a television interview at the GOP retreat in Philadelphia on Wednesday, Jan. 25, 2017. House and Senate Republicans are holding their retreat through Friday in Philadelphia, with a visit from President Donald Trump expected Thursday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

PHILADELPHIA — House Speaker Paul D. Ryan is laying out an aggressive 200-day agenda that will have Congress rolling back regulations, repealing and replacing the 2010 health care law, funding a border wall, rewriting the tax code, expanding the veterans’ choice program, advancing an infrastructure package and avoiding a debt default — all before the August recess. 

“It’s the president and his administration working hand and glove with the speaker and the majority leader,” New York Rep. Chris Collins told reporters after Ryan’s presentation at the start of the GOP retreat here on Wednesday. “It’s going to be hard. We’re going to be doing controversial things. The speaker’s message was, ‘None of this is going to be easy, and we’re going to be attacked by somebody regardless of what we do, so let’s buckle our seat belts and understand we have an obligation here.’”

Hail to the Chiefs
Incoming members look to different corners for chiefs of staff

Minh Ta, former chief of staff to Wisconsin Rep. Gwen Moore, is moving over to freshman Rep. Lisa Blunt Rochester‘s office to serve as her chief. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

With President-elect Donald Trump rounding out his Cabinet, new members of Congress have been going through a similar — although more predictable — process of filling out their congressional offices. 

The first and most important hires are almost always the chiefs of staff, who come from all walks of political life. Most commonly, new members tap their campaign managers or the chiefs of departing members. They also often retain members of their kitchen cabinets, or close personal advisers, as their chiefs. 

Study: Obamacare Repeal Could Leave 30 Million Without Coverage
Urban Institute looked at using reconciliation to repeal health care law

A new study shows partially repealing the 2010 health care law through reconciliation would cause almost 30 million people to lose health insurance.

How Tom Price Would Dismantle Obamacare
Trump’s pick for HHS has a plan for repeal and replace

Georgia Rep. Tom Price is considered one of the most vocal opponents of the 2010 health care law. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

With President-elect Donald Trump slated to nominate Georgia Republican Rep. Tom Price as his secretary of Health and Human Services, the incoming president shows he is serious about following up on his campaign promise to repeal the 2010 health care law.

As chairman of the House Budget Committee, Price has been one of the most vociferous critics of the law.

Republicans Restructure Panel for Selecting Committee Assignments
Steering Committee will have more regional representatives

House Republicans drafted new regions for electing representatives to serve on the Steering Committee, which elects committee chairmen.

House Republicans on Wednesday restructured the panel of representatives that select committee chairmen and members, removing at-large seats in favor of more regional slots. 

The move was the final piece of plan to restructure the Republican Steering Committee that the conference agreed to last November. The overhaul was part of Speaker Paul D. Ryan's promise to change GOP rules and procedures to give rank-and-file members more input. 

House GOP Postpones Decision on Whether to Restore Limited Earmarks
Ryan pledges to have a vote on the matter by the end of March

Rep. Tom Rooney, R-Fla., wants an exemption to a House GOP earmark ban for water projects. (Photo By Bill Clark/Roll Call file photo)

House Republicans began a discussion Wednesday on whether to restore limited earmarks in spending bills after banning the practice in 2010. But Speaker Paul D. Ryan requested members delay a vote on the matter until early next year. 

The House Republican Conference met for more than three hours Wednesday to discuss party rules for the 115th Congress. Among the amendments the conference debated to its rules package were two proposals to restore some form of earmarking — the once common practice of designating discretionary funds for a specific project or purpose. 

House Republicans to Obama Administration: No New Regulations
McCarthy and committee chairmen send letter to all government agencies

House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy and GOP committee chairmen sent a letter to all government agencies requesting they not advance new regulations during the remainder of President Obama’s term. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy  and Republican committee chairmen plan to send a letter Tuesday to all government agencies requesting that no new regulations move forward in the remaining months of the Obama administration.

“This is not a new request,” McCarthy said at a press conference Tuesday. “This request actually happened when Barack Obama won — Rahm Emanuel sent the same letter.”