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EMILY's List Puts 4 More GOP Senators 'On Notice'

EMILY's List signaled it may spend money against McCain in 2016. (Al Drago/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

EMILY's List, a group that supports Democratic women who back abortion rights, put four more Republican senators "On Notice" Tuesday — a signal the group could spend money to try to topple those incumbents in 2016.  

The four are among Democrats' top targets next year, when the party will seek to net the five seats necessary to ensure Senate control. All four are likely to face female challengers whom EMILY's List has endorsed or is looking at endorsing in the coming months.  

Republicans Spending Early to Boost Chances to Keep Senate

Kirk has spent some of his campaign's cash on an early bio ad to aid his re-election hopes. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

As Republicans look to defend their newfound Senate majority in 2016, early television and digital spending has more than quadrupled from this same point last cycle, a CQ Roll Call analysis shows.  

More than a year out from Election Day 2016, Republican incumbents and GOP-aligned outside groups have shelled out at least $13.3 million to boost their re-election prospects and attack potential Democratic challengers in Senate contests across the map. That's seven times more than the $1.9 million Republicans spent by this point last cycle — when the GOP was looking to win the Senate majority for the first time since 2006.  

Campaign Finance Reform PAC Wants to Be a Player in 2016

Bennet is one of two Senate race endorsements End Citizens United PAC has made so far this cycle. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

A new campaign finance reform political action committee expects to be among the top five outside groups to assist campaigns this cycle.  End Citizens United PAC has raised more than $2 million from its online supporters since it formed in March and says it's on track to raise $25 to $30 million to funnel through a yet-to-be-created independent expenditure arm.  

The group is hoping to grow its ranks when it begins renting Ready for Hillary's email list this week. That "partnership," Communications Director Richard Carbo told CQ Roll Call on Tuesday, "highlights our legitimacy."  

EMILY's List Names VP of Independent Expenditures

Stephanie Schriock is president of EMILY's List. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

EMILY's List named Lucinda Guinn vice president of independent expenditures for the 2016 cycle, according to a release provided first to CQ Roll Call.  

In this role, Guinn will be tasked with running the Women Vote! program, which spends millions of dollars in support of the group's endorsed gubernatorial, Senate and House candidates. An EMILY's List aide said Guinn will also oversee potential spending in targeted state-level races that could impact redistricting in 2020.  

The Survivor: How Democrat Ann Kirkpatrick Held On

Kirkpatrick beat the odds to win re-election. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Republican operatives called her race "cooked." One national news organization put her chances at victory of 12 percent. After all, voters in Arizona's 1st District had already fired Democratic Rep. Ann Kirkpatrick once before — in a toxic climate in 2010.  

But as House Democrats fell across the country on Nov. 4, Kirkpatrick didn't just win re-election. She expanded her margin from 2012, proving naysayers wrong thanks to one, simple political maxim: To win, a candidate has to be better than his or her opponent.  

How Republicans Caught Their White Whale: John Barrow

Barrow lost re-election last week. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Sleeper No More: Both Parties Spending on Capito Seat (Updated)

Mooney is the Republican running in West Virginia's 2nd District. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Updated 5:37 p.m. | National Democrats and Republicans will make major television buys in an off-the-radar House race in West Virginia, according to party sources tracking ad buys.  

The Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee intends to purchase $600,000 in airtime in West Virginia's 2nd District, an open-seat race to succeed Republican Rep. Shelley Moore Capito. The National Republican Congressional Committee will also make a $250,000 buy in Charleston through Election Day. The Democratic nominee is former state party chairman Nick Casey, who has longtime ties to the state and popular Sen. Joe Manchin, also a Democrat. While there is little doubt this is conservative territory, the GOP candidate is a newcomer to the state , former Maryland GOP Chairman Alex Mooney.  

NRSC Shifts Resources to Six States

Roberts, left, greets Moran, the NRSC chairman, at an event in their home state of Kansas. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call Photo)

Updated, 9:04 a.m. | TOPEKA, Kan. — With less than four weeks until Election Day, the National Republican Senatorial Committee's independent expenditure arm is shifting resources to increase its investment in six states, including South Dakota and Georgia.  

The NRSC has moved $1 million to South Dakota, plus another $1.45 million to Georgia. In South Dakota, the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee made a $1 million television ad buy this week, on the heels of tightening poll numbers that showed its candidate, Rick Weiland, gaining ground. In Georgia, a new poll suggests a runoff is likely. The NRSC also is upping its investment in four other states: Alaska, Colorado, Iowa and New Hampshire. Those four states represent an expansion of the map for the GOP into states where Democrats were favored to win earlier in the cycle.  

DCCC Cuts Airtime in 8 TV Markets

Steve Israel of New York is the DCCC Chariman. (CQ Roll Call File Photo)

The Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee has started to pull back its advertising buys in several congressional districts around the country, according to an aide.  

At this point in the cycle, the cancellations — also known as "triage " — serve as a signal the party does not see a path to victory for these candidates or races. House Majority PAC, a Democratic super PAC, has already pulled some of its buys in the same districts.