house

House Work Week Gets Shorter
GOP leaders cancel Friday votes again

House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., previously had a different idea about what they would be working on at this point in the year. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

House Republican leaders started 2017 with plans for the lower chamber to have some atypical five-day work weeks to accommodate an ambitious GOP legislative agenda, but they are starting to cut those weeks short as intraparty fueding prevents progress on their top priorities.

House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy announced Wednesday that the House would no longer be expected to hold votes this Friday, cutting their work week short and allowing lawmakers to head home early for the week-long Independence Day recess.

Trump Labels Notion He's Not Involved in Senate Health Debate a ‘Joke!’
‘I know subject well,' president tweets about health care after report that he doesn’t

President Donald Trump speaks during a meeting with Senate Republicans at the East Room of the White House on Tuesday to discuss the GOP health care bill. (Alex Wong/Getty Images)

A day after a vote on a Senate health care bill he backed was delayed, President Donald Trump pushed back against reports that he has not taken a hands-on role in crafting the measure or garnering ample votes to pass it.

Trump used one of his typical morning tweets to lash out at a narrative that has emerged in recent days, including a New York Times piece posted online Tuesday evening, describing the president as not heavily involved in Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s efforts to piece together a package that would repeal and replace Barack Obama’s 2010 health law and then find the 50 votes to pass it (with Vice President Mike Pence casting the 51st and final necessary vote).

Six Who Could Succeed Pelosi — Someday
Ouster talk fades, but speculation continues about the next generation of House Democratic leaders

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi says she’s “very confident” she retains the support of most members of her Democratic Caucus. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

One week after House Democrats finished 0-for-4 in this special election season, their burst of frustration and pique vented toward Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi appears to have fizzled.

The vexation is not going to fade away altogether, however, and neither will the lawmakers’ whispered talk in the cloakrooms or after their nightly fundraisers about which of them has a plausible shot at someday becoming Pelosi’s successor.

GOP Struggles With Message on Repealing Health Care Taxes
Plans to kill levies imposed by 2010 law slammed by Democrats

House Ways and Means Chairman Kevin Brady is the GOP point man for the overhaul of the tax code. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

When Democrats enacted two taxes on wealthy families to help finance the 2010 health care law, Republicans predicted the levies would be politically unpopular and would not survive.

Now, the GOP faces a partisan messaging battle over plans to end a Medicare payroll surtax and a separate tax on investment income that are both levied on taxpayers earning more than $200,000 (for an individual) and $250,000 (for a married couple).

Chris Van Hollen Had His Own Fake Time Magazine Cover
Trump isn’t the only politician to embellish a cover story

Maryland’s Chris Van Hollen distributed a campaign brochure featuring an imitation Time magazine cover during his successful run for Congress in 2002. (Courtesy Nathan L. Gonzales)

Some Democrats have enjoyed mocking President Donald Trump after the revelation that a framed copy of a Time magazine cover that hangs in some of his golf clubs was a fabrication. But not everyone on the Democratic side of the aisle is innocent of faking Time magazine covers.

In 2002, Maryland state Sen. Chris Van Hollen was locked in a competitive Democratic primary in the 8th District in suburban Washington, D.C. The Democratic nomination was critical because Maryland Democrats redrew the district to endanger moderate Republican incumbent Constance A. Morella.

Take Five: Brian Fitzpatrick
Pennsylvania Republican recalls arresting politicians before becoming one

Pennsylvania Rep. Brian Fitzpatrick says his work as an FBI agent has given him a “pretty neat” perspective in his new job. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Freshman Rep. Brian Fitzpatrick, 43, a Pennsylvania Republican, talks about deciding to run to replace his brother in Congress, transitioning from life as an FBI agent, and his unique perspective at his new job.

Q: What has surprised you about Congress so far?

Word on the Hill: Virginia Is Most Patriotic State
Try some West Virginia cuisine today

Both states surrounding D.C. are among the top 20 most patriotic. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call  file photo)

Virginia has been ranked the most patriotic state in America, according to a study conducted by Wallet Hub. Maryland ranks No. 17. D.C. was not included in the analysis.

The study looked at 13 indicators of patriotism in each state, including the average number of military enlistees, the share of adults who voted in the 2016 presidential election, and AmeriCorps volunteers per capita.

Trump Huddles With GOP Senators as McConnell Issues Warning
At White House, majority leader says Republicans would lose leverage in talks with Dems

Sen. Lisa Murkowski, seen here at the Capitol on Tuesday, has major concerns about the Senate health care legislation. She sat next to the president at Tuesday's White House meeting on health care. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

President Donald Trump summoned Senate Republicans to the White House on Tuesday to discuss differences that are holding up a GOP leadership crafted health bill, declaring talks are “very close” to producing a deal and that it would be “OK” if the effort fails.

The Republican senators boarded busses outside the Capitol and made the short trek down Pennsylvania Avenue shortly after Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky announced a vote on a still-evolving health overhaul measure would be delayed until after next week’s July Fourth recess. The move offered Trump, who held a Rose Garden victory celebration after the House passed its version in May, an opportunity to again cast himself as the dealmaker in chief.

Budget Disagreements Bedevil House GOP

House Budget Chairwoman Diane Black, R-Tenn., continues to look for agreement amid GOP factions on the spending blueprint. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

The House Budget Committee is unlikely to unveil a fiscal 2018 budget resolution until after the Independence Day recess as Chairwoman Diane Black continues to struggle to marry competing interests on using the reconciliation process to cut mandatory spending.

Conservatives are pushing for several hundred billion dollars in mandatory savings cuts through reconciliation, with House Freedom Caucus members saying the Budget Committee’s latest offer of $200 billion in cuts over 10 years is not enough to win their support. Meanwhile, committee chairmen are pushing back on a continually increasing target, saying they need to preserve some of those savings for other legislative negotiations.

Paul Ryan Defends CBO Role as Referee
Speaker makes comments one day after White House swipe

House Speaker Paul D. Ryan is defending CBO Director Keith Hall and his office amid White House criticism of the nonpartisan agency. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

One day after the White House criticized the Congressional Budget Office as an inaccurate arbiter, amid a heated debate over the effects of the Republicans’ plans to change the health insurance system, House Speaker Paul D. Ryan is defending the nonpartisan office. 

“Yeah, he’s actually a Republican appointee. If I’m not mistaken, Tom Price appointed him,” Ryan said Tuesday morning when asked whether he had full confidence in CBO Director Keith Hall. Price, the secretary of Health and Human Services and a key advocate of GOP efforts to repeal and replace the 2010 health care law, was previously the House Budget Committee chairman.