health-care

Trump Slowly Wades Back Into Choppy Health Care Waters
White House signals desire for more methodical try at repleacing Obama's 2010 law

Ready to try again? Rep. Greg Walden and other lawmakers might get another shot at reworking the health insurance system. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

The White House is inching ever-so-slightly toward another try at a health care overhaul package -- and Trump administration officials signaled on Wednesday they want a more methodical process this time.

In the hours and days after President Donald Trump and Speaker Paul D. Ryan, R-Wis., decided to pull a GOP-crafted measure aimed at repealing and replacing the Obama administration’s 2010 health law, the chief executive and his top aides signaled the effort was dead.

Why Committee Chairmen Should Be Concerned About Trump
White House has sent veiled warnings to appropriators, tax writers and authorizers

House Intelligence Committee Chairman Devin Nunes, R-Calif., holds a news conference in the Capitol last Wednesday. The embattled chairman’s recent actions offer a cautionary tale for his colleagues. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

ANALYSIS | For Republican committee chairmen, House Intelligence Chairman Devin Nunes has had a month that amounts to a cautionary tale.

One day, you can be the respected chairman of one of the last remaining bipartisan committees on Capitol Hill. A few weeks later, your ranking member is calling for you to step aside from the most important probe the panel has done in years. Such is life for Republican committee chairmen in the Trump era.

Trump Criticizes Ongoing House Probe of Russian Election Meddling
President also says Freedom Caucus found way to 'snatch defeat from the jaws of victory'

President Donald Trump used a series of Monday night tweets to question a House panel's probe of potential ties between his 2016 campaign and Russia. (Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

Updated at 8:27 a.m. President Donald Trump used a Monday night Twitter tirade to question the ongoing House investigation into Russian meddling in the 2016 election, showing little concern that his comments might taint the probe.

Previous presidents have been careful to avoid creating any perception that they are using the powers or political heft of the office to influence congressional or federal law enforcement investigations. Trump’s top spokesman, Sean Spicer, has mostly done the same when asked about separate probes being conducted by the House and Senate Intelligence committees.

Opinion: Can Trump Learn From His Own Bay of Pigs?
JFK wrote the script in how to deal with early setback

President John F. Kennedy’s response to the 1961 Bay of Pigs debacle offers lessons for President Donald Trump after the collapse of Trumpcare, Shapiro writes. (Getty Images File Photo)

The fledgling president, ridiculed for his inexperience during the recent campaign, had just suffered a stunning setback less than 100 days after taking office. He ruefully admitted afterward, “No one knows how tough this job is until he has been in it a few months.”

Talking with a friend, the embarrassed president raged over his gullibility in accepting the advice of his top advisers. As he put it, “I sat around that day and all these fellas all saying, ‘This is going to work.’ … Now, in retrospect, I know they didn’t have any intention of giving me the straight word on this thing.”

The Search for Intelligent Bipartisanship on Health Care
Rank-and-file lawmakers to keep pushing the issue

Sens. Susan Collins, R-Maine, and Bill Cassidy, R-La., say their bill could be a path forward on health care. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

By BRIDGET BOWMAN and NIELS LESNIEWSKI, CQ Roll Call 

With Republican leaders pausing their quest to overturn the 2010 health care law, rank-and-file lawmakers see an opportunity for outreach behind the scenes on the divisive issue.

House Floor Schedule Leaves Time for GOP Soul-Searching
Group meetings will be more crucial than usual after health care debacle

Speaker Paul D. Ryan and his conference will spend much of the week soul searching and charting their path forward after last week’s health care defeat. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

The House has a limited floor schedule this week, leaving Republicans plenty of time to huddle behind closed doors and chart the conference’s path forward after their failure to advance their top legislative priority of repealing and replacing the 2010 health care law. 

The intraparty soul searching will begin Tuesday morning during the weekly GOP conference meeting and continue throughout the week during smaller meetings of the Republican factions such as the Tuesday Group, Republican Study Committee and House Freedom Caucus.

Wounded White House is Uncharacteristically Quiet
Turf war could be brewing on tax overhaul

President Donald Trump, center, pushed hard but came up short on health care. He's now moved on, say senior aides, but the same pitfalls remain for future endeavors. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

The White House on Monday continued licking the wounds of its first legislative defeat, even as President Donald Trump and his lieutenants gear up for a Supreme Court battle, a government funding fight and a tax overhaul push that will likely be bruising.

Apart from now-familiar contentious moments during the daily press briefing, Monday was eerily quiet at the executive mansion — a departure from the previous two frenetic weeks.

Cloud Hangs Over Trump-Ryan Partnership After Health Care Bill Fails
’The closer’ in chief fails to convert first legislative save

President Donald Trump sits in the cab of a big rig truck as he welcomed members of American Trucking Associations to the White House on Thursday. A day later, the health care overhaul package he backed was pulled because too many House Republicans opposed it. (Alex Wong/Getty Images)

The death of President Donald Trump’s first major legislative initiative raises major questions about his ability to keep the fractious Republican caucus together and work with House Speaker Paul D. Ryan

GOP House members handed Trump another early-term setback Friday by killing the health care bill he demanded they take up when too many of them refused to support it. The White House and Ryan signaled their next legislative move would be a pivot toward a sweeping tax overhaul package that could prove just as tough to pass.

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Opinion: Trump Needs to Reread ‘The Art of the Comeback’
The president’s political embrace and his threats are both equally empty

President Donald Trump waves to the crowd after addressing a joint session of Congress in the Capitol's House Chamber, February 28, 2017. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

After just nine weeks in the Oval Office, Donald Trump is already forced to resort to his third book, “The Art of the Comeback.”

From James Comey’s artfully cloaked shiv in last Monday’s congressional testimony to the head-for-the-lifeboats abandonment of Trumpcare on Friday, it is hard to recall a president who has had a worse week without someone being indicted.