ethics

Rep. Chris Collins pleads not guilty to revised indictment, trial still set for February 2020
New York Republican was indicted last August on charges of insider trading and lying to the FBI

Rep. Chris Collins, R-N.Y., pleaded not guilty Thursday to a revised set of charges related to insider trading and lying to the FBI. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Rep. Chris Collins pleaded not guilty to a revised indictment on Thursday in New York, where he, his son Cameron Collins and Stephen Zarsky, the father of Cameron Collins’ onetime fiancee, were initially indicted in August 2018 on insider trading charges and lying to the FBI.

Prosecutors have dropped three of the original eight securities fraud charges against Collins and two against his son and Zarsky in order to speed up the pretrial process in time for the trial slated for Feb. 3, 2020.

Capitol Ink | Mixed Messages

Issa on challenging fellow Republican Hunter: ‘He cannot win reelection’
California Republican represented adjacent district for 18 years, believes Hunter's legal troubles jeopardize GOP control of seat

Former Republican Rep. Darrell Issa has signaled he might come out of retirement to run in California’s 50th District, currently held by embattled GOP Rep. Duncan Hunter. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Former Rep. Darrell Issa signaled over the weekend that he intends to run for Congress in Rep. Duncan Hunter’s district if he is not confirmed to a position in the Trump administration by winter.

Issa and Hunter are both Republican.

Capitol Ink | Capitol Hell

Democrats launch investigation into Pence’s stay at Trump Hotel in Ireland, Trump’s G7 plans
House Judiciary and Oversight panels probing whether Pence’s stay at Trump resort in Ireland and potential G7 summit at Trump Doral would be emoluments violations

Vice President Mike Pence and Taoiseach Leo Varadkar depart after holding a news conference at Farmleigh House in Dublin, Ireland, on Tuesday. House Democrats are investigating whether President Donald Trump, Pence and others violated the emoluments clause of the Constitution for Pence staying at Trump’s property in Ireland. (Charles McQuillan/Getty Images)

Two House committees are investigating President Donald Trump, Vice President Mike Pence, and other administration officials for possibly violating the Constitution's emoluments clause when Pence stayed at Trump's golf resort in Ireland.

The Democratic lawmakers are also probing whether Trump's continued promotion of a possible G7 summit location next year at his Trump National Doral resort near Miami would violate the emoluments clause.

Ethics Committee releases more details on allegations against David Schweikert
Arizona Republican is already facing inquiry by House panel

The House Ethics Committee has released more information about its investigation of Arizona Rep. David Schweikert. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The House Ethics Committee has released information on an expanded list of allegations against Rep. David Schweikert. The Arizona Republican is under investigation by the panel, which made public a second referral from the Office of Congressional Ethics. 

Under House Ethics rules, the committee is required to release OCE referrals one year after they are sent to the House.

Authorities probing Rep. Steve Chabot’s campaign for missing $100,000+
Ohio Republican’s campaign is ‘prepared to fully cooperate and assist’ investigation

Ohio Rep. Steve Chabot’s campaign pledged to cooperate with authorities investigating a discrepancy of more than $100,000 in his finances. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Authorities are investigating whether someone stole more than $100,000 from Ohio Republican Rep. Steve Chabot’s reelection fund, according to his campaign’s lawyer.

“Congressman Chabot was shocked and deeply disappointed to be informed yesterday afternoon that his campaign committee may be the victim of financial malfeasance and misappropriation of funds,” Mark Braden said in a statement Wednesday afternoon.

Ex-Rep. Aaron Schock off the hook after concluding deal with feds over fund misuse
Illinois Republican left with clean record, leaving open a political comeback

Federal charges against former Rep. Aaron Schock, R-Ill., were officially dropped in a deal with prosecutors. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Former Rep. Aaron Schock was officially cleared Wednesday of criminal charges alleging he used his campaign funds as a personal piggy bank, six months after the Illinois Republican struck a deal with federal prosecutors.

The deferred prosecution agreement, first announced in March, required Schock to pay $42,000 to the IRS and $68,000 to his congressional campaign fund. His campaign committee, Schock for Congress, pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor count of failing to properly report expenses. Schock admitted to overbilling the House of Representatives for mileage as he drove around his district for both official and campaign purposes.

Regardless of Rep. Collins’ appeals, government plans to proceed with trial against co-defendants
Trial for New York Republican and his son scheduled for February

Rep. Chris Collins, R-N.Y., wants to delay his trial for securities fraud charges scheduled for Feb. 3, 2020, according to prosecutors. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Even if his appeal is unresolved by the time Rep. Chris Collins’ securities fraud trial is set to begin in February, the government still wants to proceed with the trial of his co-defendants.

U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York Geoffrey Berman wrote in a letter filed Tuesday to Judge Vernon Broderick that regardless of how any appeal filed by the New York Republican proceeds, the appeal would have no bearing on the Feb. 3 trial date for Collins’ son, Cameron Collins, and Stephen Zarsky, the father of his onetime fiancee who bought stock in part based on Cameron Collins’ recommendation.

In our podcast, we’re gone to Carolina
Political Theater, Episode 91

Dan McCready, the Democratic candidate in North Carolina’s 9th District, campaigns in Pembroke, N.C., on Aug. 10. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

It’s September 2019, but we’re only just now wrapping up the 2018 election. Voters in North Carolina’s 9th District will finish it all off on when they decide on Sept. 10 whether Democrat Dan McCready or Republican Dan Bishop will represent them in Congress. 

The lagging special election was necessary because the North Carolina State Board of Elections threw out last fall’s initial results because of election fraud tied to the Republican effort and its nominee, Mark Harris.