down-time

Guest-List App IDs D.C.'s A-List Venues

D.C. loves itself a party. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Of course there's an app for checking in to a guest list, and for those heading to the MSNBC after party on Saturday after the White House Correspondents' Association Dinner, you'll be checked in using zkipster.  

Now that we're on the countdown to Saturday's goat rodeo, zkipster released a list of what it considers the top venues in D.C. to "witness political and social power." Drumroll, please.

Rolling With the DC Brew Crew

(Warren Rojas/CQ Roll Call)

"By the end of the day, we'll all be drinking buddies," DC Brew Tour Guide Max Moline pledged as he pulled away from the curb and began inundating those of us who’d signed on for a mid-day swing through the various beer-making operations that have bubbled up across the area with trivia about barley- and hops-related beverages.  

Moline’s curious career was made possible by visionary Chad Brodsky, the founder and CEO of a budding tourism experience that caters to folks who never balk at a chance to bend the elbow.  

What to See and Do in Selma

The city of Selma prepares for the 50th anniversary of "Bloody Sunday." (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

SELMA, Ala., — Every year, Rep. John Lewis, D-Ga., makes a pilgrimage here to walk the Edmund Pettus Bridge, tracing the fateful steps he took on March 7, 1965, when he and others marching in favor of voting rights were savagely beaten by state troopers and thugs.  

Friends, activists and fellow members of Congress have frequently joined him over the years, but not in the numbers expected for the upcoming 50th anniversary, when about 100 of his colleagues and President Barack Obama are expected to help him mark the half-century mark since "Bloody Sunday." If you're heading there yourself, here are a few things to check out, including places where the Selma to Montgomery March was planned, as well as a great spot for a proper Southern breakfast. Photographer Spider Martin's images of "Bloody Sunday" and the subsequent march to Montgomery are the ones most often burned into our consciousness. Lewis and Hosea Williams facing troopers just before the billy clubs and tear gas were unleashed, Martin Luther King Jr. leading the march across treacherous territory.  

Scaring Up a Good Time in D.C.

It's the season of the witch. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Looking for something a little less terrifying than another round of campaign ads? How about a Halloween week dose of Franz Kafka, ladled over with a rock opera and topped with a smattering of fright-filled movies at Union Market, E Street and the AFI Silver Theater? Kafka at the Library The author of some of the literary canon's creepiest stories, including "The Metamorphosis," gets star treatment at the Library of Congress Wednesday with "Glimpses of Kafka's Fiction and Memoirs for the Stage." Who better to bring a short film and theater performance musing on the master of Middle European dread than faculty and students from Georgetown University, the setting for "The Exorcist," one of the greatest horror films of all time. Free, at 101 Independence Ave. SE in the James Madison Building's Pickford Theater from 1 p.m. to 2 p.m.  

Atlas Electrified Looking for a psychedelic Halloween? Starting Friday, the Atlas Performing Arts Center hosts the Baltimore Rock Opera Society's latest original piece, "The Electric Pharaoh," which the Atlas describes as the story of a "strange boy" who is looking for the secrets of Egypt's pyramids in a "futuristic dark age" ruled by an electricity-hoarding pharaoh and "set to a synthesis of garage rock and larger-than-life electronic sounds." So it's a documentary about Baltimore? (Kidding. We love Charm City.) Shows are scheduled for Friday, Saturday and Sunday evenings at 1333 H St. NE and are available on the Atlas' website .  

What To Do in D.C.'s In-Between Times

Well, we all know what we'll be doing in two weeks: sweating out election returns. And next week is Halloween. But what about this week — particularly if you're not on the trail or otherwise — should you find yourself in Washington, D.C.?  

Phillips Goes to The Wall The Phillips Collection is getting a little help with its exterior decorating this week, inviting four Senegalese artists — Muhsana Ali, Fode Camara, Viye Diba and Piniang (Ibrahima Niang) — to paint a mural on the wall of the museum's Hunter Courtyard that will be unveiled to the public Thursday at noon. "The Leading Edge Ideas: Inside the 21st Century Museum" is part of the Phillips' partnership with the State Department's Office of Art in Embassies and is designed to set the stage for this weekend's International Forum Weekend. (Don't act like you didn't know it was International Forum Weekend.)  

A Welcome Back Calendar

Short Cuts The DC Shorts Film Festival starts on Sept. 11, showcasing an international slate of 150 short-length films in 90-minute blocks through Sept. 21. Close-in venues like the Atlas Performing Arts Center at 1333 H St. NE and Landmark's E Street Theater at 555 11th St. NW will host shows, but so will further flung ones like the Angelika Film Center and Cafe Mosaic in Fairfax, Va., and the Anacostia Arts Center across the river from Capitol Hill. For a full run-down of films, go to dcshorts.com .  

The (Ken) Russell Building www.youtube.com/watch?v=GX0v6NMusC4  

Congressional Cemetery's Day of the Dog: It Could Get Ruff

Congressional Cemetery. It's gone to the dogs. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Congressional Cemetery will help usher out the dogs days of summer with its Day of the Dog , welcoming local breweries, food trucks, dogs and the people who serve them on Saturday.  

The free event, which lasts from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., is just the latest good-vibe party to swoop in on the final resting place for so many Capitol Hill denizens. Last week, the cemetery's latest 5K, Flee the British, brought the historically minded running crowd over for a race on the 200th anniversary of the burning of Washington by the British army. The British muskets that doubled as the starting gun were a nice touch, as was "Dolly Madison" fleeing the redcoats in a golf cart. There were even redcoat hecklers. "Run, you cowardly Washingtonians!" one said from a hillock full of family mausoleums.  

Roll Call Book Club: We're Here to Make Sure You're Not 'Overwhelmed'

Theoretically, we still have the same 24 hours in a day our grandparents and their grandparents had. But it sure doesn't feel like it. We're "busy, busy, busy," as the late, great Kurt Vonnegut Jr., wrote.  

A city such as Washington is filled with strivers and striving, filling every conceivable moment with constructive, career-related activity. But that sense of compressed time is not just the purview of places like Washington. People have their hair on fire in Fargo, N.D., too, as Brigid Schulte tells it in her new book "Overwhelmed: Work, Love, and Play When No One Has the Time." The problem, she writes, is spreading as we divvy up our days into a thousand pieces.  

Washington's Biggest Repertory Cinema: The Great Outdoors

(CQ Roll Call File Photo)

The outdoor summer movie circuit is in full swing, with plenty of al fresco viewing to go around in Washington, including the grande dame herself, the upcoming Screen on the Green on the National Mall.  

Screen on the Green, which is entering its 16th year, starts back up between Seventh and 12th streets on July 21 with "The Karate Kid," that touchstone of 1980s and Generation X culture. It continues on following Mondays with "Lover Come Back," "Key Largo" and "A Soldier's Story."