democrats

Unorthodox Senate deal clears path for Thursday NDAA vote
Democrats had threatened to filibuster the defense bill unless the Iran amendment received a vote on Friday

From left, Sens. John Thune, R-S.D., John Barrasso, R-Wyo., Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., Roy Blunt, R-Mo., James Inhofe, R-Okla., and Joni Ernst, R-Iowa, conduct a news conference in the Capitol after the Senate Policy luncheons on Tuesday, June 25, 2019. As part of a compromise on the NDAA, McConnell said Wednesday he would allow a vote on language blocking President Donald Trump from launching a war against Iran without congressional approval. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Senate leaders struck an unusual deal Wednesday afternoon to hold a vote on language that would block President Donald Trump from launching a war against Iran without congressional approval, paving the way for a final vote on the massive Pentagon policy measure on Thursday.

But the vote on the Iran amendment will happen on Friday, to accommodate Senate Democrats participating in presidential debates this week, a GOP aide said. If the chamber adopts the language, which has the support of at least two Republican senators, it would then be retroactively included in the fiscal 2020 defense authorization bill.

Senate approves border bill; Pelosi and Trump talk compromise

Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., and other Democratic leaders are weighing their next move on a border supplemental aid package. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Updated 10:35 p.m. | With the Senate’s passage of its version of a border supplemental funding bill Wednesday, and its rejection of the House measure, negotiations between the White House, Senate and House leaders will now attempt to nail down a compromise before Congress leaves for the July Fourth recess.

Several disagreements lie at the heart of Senate and House differences on the two bills. The Senate bill rejected some of the tight restrictions the House included in its measure on the care of migrant children in government custody. The Senate also added in more money than the House for border enforcement agencies and for more immigration judges.

Appeals court move potentially an ‘ominous’ sign for Obamacare
The law could face strong headwinds in its latest test in the federal courts

Affordable Care Act supporters wave signs outside the Supreme Court after the court upheld Obamacare. A federal appeals court decision to question whether the House and Democratic-led states can defend the law could prove a troublesome sign for the landmark legislation. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

A federal appeals court has questioned whether the House and Democrat-led states can defend the 2010 health care law in a legal fight that threatens the landmark legislation — a sign the law could face strong headwinds in its latest test in the federal courts.

The House and states had jumped to intervene in the lawsuit after a federal judge in Texas ruled the entire law should fall without the so-called individual mandate, including popular provisions preventing insurance companies from denying coverage or charging more because of pre-existing conditions.

House Democrats lose procedural vote to GOP minority for first time in months
Approval of Republican motion to recommit on Financial Services spending bill added a last-minute Iran amendment

House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer, D-Md., said the members of his caucus who voted for the GOP motion to recommit felt they had to support the Iran language. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The House Democratic majority on Wednesday lost a procedural vote to the Republican minority for the first time in four months, as 37 Democrats joined Republicans in adding a last-minute Iran amendment to the Financial Services spending bill.

The amendment was approved through a Republican motion to recommit, or MTR — a procedural tool of the minority used primarily for messaging.

Field notes from a North Carolina runoff and a reparations hearing
Political Theater Podcast, Episode 79

The GOP primary runoff in North Carolina’s 3rd District has become somewhat of a proxy war between House Freedom Caucus leaders Mark Meadows, left, and Jim Jordan, and House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

There is always a special congressional election somewhere. For the purposes of this particular Political Theater podcast, it is the upcoming Republican primary runoff in North Carolina’s 3rd District.

This is the seat that became vacant when longtime GOP Rep. Walter B. Jones died earlier this year. The April 30 GOP primary ended with two candidates heading to a July 9 runoff: state Rep. Greg Murphy and political newcomer Joan Perry. (The winner will face Democrat Allen Thomas, the former mayor of Greenville, in a Sept. 10 special general election to serve out the remainder of the 116th Congress.)

House Ethics Committee names working group to combat outside work conflicts
The bipartisan group will oversee lawmakers, officers and employees who serve in positions outside federal government

Rep. Susan Wild, D-Pa., will lead the working group with Rep. Van Taylor, R-Texas. (CQ Roll Call)

A bipartisan working group has been formed by the House Ethics Committee to examine what types of service or positions outside of Congress could result in conflicts of interest and to craft proposed regulations for the committee’s consideration that govern those pursuits.

Rep. Susan Wild, D-Pa., and Rep. Van Taylor, R-Texas, will comprise the group that will focus on creating regulations that oversee lawmakers, officers and employees who work or serve in positions outside of the federal government.

For first time in 2020 cycle, Trump makes abortion a reelection issue
‘The wrong person in office … can change it very quickly,’ POTUS warns conservative group

President Donald Trump greets Blake Marnell of San Diego during a rally at the Williamsport Regional Airport in Montoursville, Pa., May 20. Marnell's jacket has a pattern depicting Trump's proposed southern border wall. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

President Donald Trump on Wednesday injected abortion — one of the country’s most divisive issues — into the 2020 campaign debate, warning a conservative audience that inaction at the ballot box will erode recent anti-abortion moves.

Republicans have been celebrating a number of state-level moves to restrict access to abortion, and are hopeful that a number of legal challenges will uphold those new laws. But Trump, who rode to the White House on a conservative movement, had a message for a Faith & Freedom Coalition conference in Washington.

Rep. Susan Wild honors late partner in a tearful floor speech
‘Why am I sharing this personal story? Because I want everyone to know that mental health issues know no boundaries,‘ she said

Rep.-elect Susan Wild is seen after the freshman class photo on the East Front of the Capitol on November 14, 2018. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Rep. Susan Wild honored her late partner in a tearful floor speech Tuesday night.

Wild shared that her longtime partner, attorney Kerry Acker, died by suicide exactly one month ago. She made the revelation in a speech on the House floor during a stretch of voting on a bill to direct emergency spending to the U.S. Southern Border. 

Trump on Mueller testifying before House committees: ‘It never ends’
President signals final deal on trade with China unlikely before he meets with Xi at G-20 summit

President Donald Trump speaks to reporters on Tuesday at the White House. On Wednesday he told Fox Business that the U.S. is “taking in a fortune” from tariffs he slapped on Chines goods. (Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

President Donald Trump on Wednesday described former Special Counsel Robert S. Mueller’s upcoming testimony before two Democratic-led House panels as merely part of a phony probe that “never ends.”

The House Judiciary and Intelligence committees announced Tuesday night that the former FBI director will testify during a joint July 17 hearing in what will be one of the biggest moments in Washington in some time.

Trump jets to Japan to wing it at G-20 summit as Iran tensions build
Official unable to lay out agenda for high-stakes meetings with Xi, Putin and MBS

Air Force One arrives with President Donald Trump for a rally in Montoursville, Pa., on May 20. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

After a week of brinksmanship and backing down, President Donald Trump  heads to a G-20 summit in Japan on Wednesday for talks with other world leaders amid a volatile confrontation with Iran and stalled trade talks with China.

Senior administration officials made clear this week that Trump, who admits his negotiating style is based on gut feelings and big bets, will largely wing it at the meeting. Officials declined to describe any set agenda for the president’s talks with world leaders, including Chinese President Xi Jinping, Russian President Vladimir Putin and South Korean President Moon Jae-in.