democrats

Attempts to Find Bipartisan Mood Challenged at Start
Despite hope among both parties, partisanship rears ugly head

President Donald J. Trump addresses the crowd after being sworn in as the 45th President of the United States on the West Front of the Capitol, January 20, 2017. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

President Donald Trump’s inauguration ushered in hopes from both sides of the aisle for some bipartisan comity. But shortly after Trump departed the Capitol Friday, those feelings ran headfirst into the partisan scars of the previous Congress.

Some Democrats see the GOP reaping the rewards of what they call a strategy of obstruction in the last Congress, and it might be difficult for them to heed calls for bipartisanship, even if it’s something they might believe needs to happen. 

The Final Dignity of Hillary Clinton
An example for the nation: Time to move forward

Hillary Clinton, seen here at inauguration, shows America again and again that it’s returning from failure that matters, Murphy writes. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

I can’t remember how many times in the last three months I have typed “the final indignity of Hillary Clinton.” Even for a woman who has been in the spotlight for decades, she seems to have had more than her fair share.

Had she not run for the Senate as first lady, it’s possible that Clinton’s final indignity would have been her husband’s betrayals, literally in the Oval Office, after she had supported him for years. But after a failed impeachment against him and a New York listening tour for her, “Mrs. Clinton” became “Sen. Clinton” and she was on her way to a political career of her own.

Inauguration Day in Photos: Trump Supporters Take to Mall, Protesters Light Up Streets
Jan. 20, 2017 as seen by Roll Call's photographers

People gather on the National Mall on Friday morning. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

As thousands gathered on the West Front of the Capitol to witness the swearing-in of Donald Trump as the 45th president of the United States, protesters attempted to block entrances to the mall and parade route and some caused damage to property in downtown D.C.

President Trump: ‘From This Day Forward ... Only America First’
45th president signals major policy shifts in inaugural address

Donald Trump greets President Barack Obama moments before Trump was sworn in as the 45th president of the United States, on the West Front of the Capitol. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

President Donald Trump, very much still in campaign mode, vowed in his inaugural address to use his new powers to turn the country inward and “rebuild” America, telling his countrymen and the world he will govern with a simple principle: “It’s going to be only America first.” 

In a striking scene, the bombastic businessman and former reality television star, spoke from the very spot where American political giants like Ronald Reagan and Barack Obama delivered their first remarks as commander in chief.

Highlights of Donald Trump’s Inauguration
Bushes arrive for 45th president’s swearing in

President Donald Trump is sworn in as the 45th president of the United States by Chief Justice John Roberts on the West Front of the Capitol on Friday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

The inauguration of President Donald Trump was full of both Trump bombast and the ceremonial pomp and circumstance that comes with the swearing in of a new commander in chief.

On one end, many worked to uphold the democratic traditions while Trump sought to drive home the points of his inauguration.

Trump’s Inauguration Day Arrives, With Many Questions
Top spokesman, amid concerns, vows ’we're ready to go’

Members of Marine Barracks Washington gather on the West Front of the Capitol on Inauguration Day before President-elect Donald Trump’s swearing in. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Updated at 9:51 a.m. | Washington is undergoing a major transformation, but Donald Trump’s inauguration brings more questions than answers.

To be sure, very little is known about what to expect from his much-anticipated inaugural address from the West Front of the Capitol. His top spokesman has promised a “personal” speech that is “unique” while laying out a vision for his presidency.

Ryan Still Doesn't Want to Run for President
Speaker says ‘the left’ is trying to delegitimize Trump’s presidency before it starts

Speaker Paul D. Ryan insists he still does not want to run for president. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Speaker Paul D. Ryan has been asked hundreds, if not thousands, of times if he wants to run for president one day. The answer has not changed. 

“No,” Ryan said in an interview with Charlie Rose scheduled to air on PBS late Thursday. “It’s just not an ambition that I’ve long harbored, or I’ve harbored.” 

Trump Administration’s First (Unofficial) Day in Washington
Spokesman clashes with Schumer; press credentials get you to nowhere

Several temporary toilets placed on Capitol grounds for the Inauguration have been labeled “Trump’s Tower” with a marker. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Inauguration Day is Friday but the Trump administration’s first official day in Washington was Thursday, as the incoming team clashed with Senate Democrats over its Cabinet nominations.

“There is no excuse,” White House Press Secretary-designee Sean Spicer said, for what he dubbed “delay tactics” by Senate Democrats on some of President-elect Donald Trump’s Cabinet selections. Spicer was in mid-administration form as he added that the Democrats’ tactics “call into question” whether they want a “government of continuity.”

Maine Gov. LePage Ups Ante About Lewis
Refuses to back down from earlier remarks about Lewis, says NAACP should apologize to white people

Rep. John Lewis, D-Ga., was criticized by Maine Gov. Paul LePage for not attending President Elect Donald Trump's inauguration. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Maine Gov. Paul LePage is not backing down from comments he made about Rep. John Lewis boycotting incoming President Donald Trump’s inauguration.

On a radio interview last weekend, LePage said Lewis should remember that Republicans were the advocates for civil rights, the Portland Press Herald reported.

Graphic: How Trump Cabinet Compares to Other Presidents' First Cabinets
Expect fewer lawyers, more military experience

Steven Mnuchin, President-elect Donald Trump's nominee for Treasury secretary, spent time at Goldman Sachs and several hedge funds before getting nominated for Trump's Cabinet. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

By SEAN MCMINN and RANDY LEONARD CQ Roll Call

Donald Trump’s picks for his Cabinet have less government experience and schooling than the first Cabinets of the past three presidents. Trump's skews older, much wealthier and has fewer minorities.