debt-ceiling

Grass Roots to Ryan: Show, Don't Tell, on Budget Deal

Boehner, left, and Ryan share a moment on the House floor. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Paul D. Ryan isn’t even House speaker yet, but conservative grass-roots activists say he can't hide while his predecessor moves a budget and debt-limit deal they despise. Their message: Ryan must lead — now.  

Outgoing Speaker John A. Boehner, in setting the stage for Ryan to take the gavel Thursday, is pushing through a major deal the nation’s business community widely cheers. But instead of leaving Ryan with the clean barn the retiring Ohio Republican promised, the move already is creating blowback from GOP hard-liners for the likely speaker. Ryan told NBC the deal’s process “stinks” Tuesday and pledged to run the House a different way, but conservative organizations aren’t buying it and they want to see actions from the incoming speaker, not words.  

5 Things to Watch in the House This Week

Boehner, left, will likely be handing the speaker's gavel over to Ryan at the end of the week. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Any other week, a rare, mid-session speaker election might be the only news of note in the House, but a confluence of legislative deadlines and a corresponding race for the Ways and Means gavel make for a hectic atmosphere in Speaker John A. Boehner's final week in Congress.  

Conservative Debt Limit Plan Shelved

Boehner wants to raise the debt limit before he resigns next week. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Speaker John A. Boehner said he hoped to raise the debt limit before he resigns from Congress, but he's running out of time to meet the Nov. 3 deadline in advance of his scheduled Oct. 30 departure.  

The Ohio Republican has five more legislative days to avoid a federal government default before the politically messy task falls to his successor. Earlier this week, Boehner and other GOP leaders were prepared to start the inevitable game of legislative volleyball with the Senate: They would put a bill on the floor as soon as Friday that would raise the debt ceiling through early 2017, plus make sweeping changes to the annual congressional budget process.  

As GOP Mulls Its Future, All Eyes Fixed on Paul Ryan

Ryan faces one of the most pivotal weeks of his career. (Al Drago/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Paul D. Ryan has a decision to make, and until the Wisconsin Republican makes up his mind, many of the other pressing questions that face House Republicans are on hold.  

Ryan and his House GOP colleagues return to the Capitol Tuesday. But with first votes held off until 6:30 p.m., as is customary on the fly-in day, Ryan probably has until Wednesday morning, during the weekly House Republican Conference meeting, to make an announcement on whether he's willing to run for speaker — and even then, Ryan's decision could be in flux. Sources close to Ryan suggest that while the Ways and Means chairman doesn't want the job, he may be open to the speakership  if the entire GOP conference is behind him. That seems like an unlikely scenario, a standard of unanimity that Ryan realizes is just about impossible in these days of faction. But those sources also told CQ Roll Call that, should Ryan decide to take the gavel, he'd probably understand there will be some conservatives who will oppose him.  

Lew to Boehner: U.S. Runs Out of Cash in 19 Days

Boehner (Bill Clark/Roll Call File Photo)

Team Boehner: Debt Ceiling Deal 'Certainly Possible'

Boehner wants to "clean the barn" before he resigns. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

John A. Boehner has said he wants to "clean the barn" of some unfinished legislative business before he steps down, and on Wednesday the speaker's team confirmed that could include a deal to avoid a financial default by the federal government.  

"The speaker has made it clear that he wants to solve some outstanding issues before he leaves," a Boehner aide told CQ Roll Call. "No decisions have been made, but a resolution on the debt ceiling is certainly possible." The comment came amid reports that Boehner, who had originally intended to step down at the end of the month, is working on a bill to raise the debt limit before the nation run out of cash next month.  

House GOP Regroups, Still With No Endgame in Sight

Ryan leaves a meeting of the House Republican Conference in the Capitol Thursday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

House Republicans described the mood as "good" inside the closed-door members' meeting Friday morning — despite the fact that less than 24 hours earlier, lawmakers were reportedly in tears over the news that Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy was withdrawing from the race for speaker.  

"Heh heh!" Rep. Mike Simpson, R-Idaho, trilled when asked whether he thought the uncertainty over the leadership vacuum in conference would be resolved by close of business Friday, when the House adjourns for a weeklong recess. After a day of chaos, there was reassurance that Speaker John A. Boehner had pledged to maintain his hold on the gavel for as long as it takes for members to select a successor.  

Boehner Warns Fellow Republicans: 'Beware False Prophets'

Boehner defended his record Sunday. (Bill Clark/Roll Call File Photo)

House Speaker John A. Boehner has a word of warning, straight out of the Bible, for fellow Republicans: "Beware false prophets."  

Boehner's advice, offered during an interview Sunday on CBS' "Face the Nation," came after the speaker was asked if some members of the GOP conference have unrealistic ideas about how to govern.  

Planned Parenthood Battle Puts Boehner in Bind

Boehner faces balancing act this month. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

With the end of the fiscal year, September is almost always a busy month on Capitol Hill. But this year, a funding fight over Planned Parenthood is shaping up to be emblematic of John A. Boehner's entire speakership: a subtle and chaotic effort to lead a divided Republican Conference while avoiding the most damaging public relations pitfalls.  

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has already said Republicans don't have the votes to defund Planned Parenthood. But House conservatives — mobilized by the release of a series of undercover videos featuring officials talking about abortion procedures — seem undeterred. "Personally, there's no way I'm going to vote for something that gives money to this organization in light of what we discovered," House Freedom Caucus Chairman Jim Jordan, R-Ohio, recently told CQ Roll Call.  

Abe Speech Checks All but 1 Conspicuous Box

The Washington Coalition for Comfort Women Issues, Inc. rallies Wednesday outside the Capitol during Abe's address to Congress. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

It was a perfectly acceptable address: reverent, touching, even a little funny. But Shinzō Abe's speech to Congress Wednesday will be remembered less for any applause line and more for what was left unsaid.  

The Japanese prime minister avoided the most contentious issue surrounding the speech, namely: demands for an overt apology for Japan's sexual enslavement of "comfort women" during World War II.