dccc

Steve Israel Finds New Platform
Former DCCC chairman, former Sen. Rick Santorum to join CNN as contributors

Former Rep. Steve Israel, D-N.Y., talks with reporters in the Capitol Visitor Center after a meeting with House Democrats in June 2016. (CQ Roll Call file photo)

Former New York Democratic Rep. Steve Israel, an eight-term veteran of the House, is joining CNN as a contributor to its political coverage.

CNN anchor and media correspondent Brian Stelter tweeted Tuesday morning that the former chairman of the House Democratic Policy and Communications Committee and former chairman of the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee will join the network.

Democratic Senate Incumbents Could Withstand Rust Belt Shift
An early look at the re-election prospects of 4 senators from Trump states

Democratic Sen. Sherrod Brown will be up for re-election in 2018 in Ohio, where Republicans Donald Trump and Sen. Rob Portman won handily last year. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

In the final stretch of the 2016 campaign, Paul Maslin could sense that former Sen. Russ Feingold was in trouble, as the Wisconsin Democrat tried to win back his Senate seat from Republican incumbent Sen. Ron Johnson.

“I could feel Johnson found a message groove and Russ was doing sort of a victory lap,” said Maslin, a Democratic consultant in the Badger State, who was doing work for the independent expenditure arm of the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee.

Nolan Mulling a Run for Minnesota Governor
Says he would ‘give it some thought’ after being asked to consider run

Rep. Rick Nolan, D-Minn., is considering a run for governor after pulling off a squeaker victory in 2016. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Rep. Rick Nolan, D-Minn., says he’s been asked to run for governor in 2018, and he’s considering it. But for now, he’s leaning toward staying in Congress.

“It was not an idea of mine,” Nolan told the Twin Cities Pioneer Press. “It’s one of those things that genuinely came from other sources, and out of respect for them, I said I would give it some thought.” 

Blum Mocks Democrats Over Russian Hacking
Democratic group says it takes one to know one

Rep. Rod Blum, R-Iowa, joked Democrats couldn’t “hack” the cold weather in Washington. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Rep. Rod Blum, R-Iowa, mocked Democrats over the Russian hacking scandal with a joke about the Democratic National Committee on his Facebook page.

Blum posted a photo on his Sunday saying, “Walked to work past DNC HQ this afternoon. Nobody there — I guess they couldn't ‘hack’ this cold weather!”

Is There Space for a Republican EMILY’s List?
Litmus tests might not work the same way on the right

Alabama’s Martha Roby is one of only 26 Republican women in Congress. Some party members wonder if they need their own version of EMILY’s List to increase that number. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

As recently as the second Reagan administration, Republicans had more women in Congress than Democrats. Then EMILY’s List took hold.

The political action committee, founded in 1984, dedicated itself to electing Democratic women who support abortion rights, becoming an influential force in primaries even when it clashed with the wishes of party leaders. Now, of the 104 women in the 115th Congress, 75 percent are Democrats.

Zinke Appointment Would Open Up Montana At-Large Seat
Democrat Denise Juneau hasn’t ruled out another run for public office

Democrat Denise Juneau, who lost to Republican Rep. Ryan Zinke last month, says she’d like to stay in Montana but hasn’t closed the door on another run for public office. (Thomas McKinless/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Montana Republican Rep. Ryan Zinke won re-election last month by 16 points, but now that President-elect Donald Trump has reportedly offered him the job of Interior secretary, there’ll likely be another race for the at-large seat. 

Trump won the state with 56 percent of the vote to Democrat Hillary Clinton’s 36 percent, according to the Montana secretary of state’s office. Mitt Romney carried the 87 percent white state by a smaller 13-point margin. 

Even as They Embrace Luján, Democrats Take Aim at DCCC Staff
Frustrated members look for answers for last four cycles

Ohio Rep. Tim Ryan, center, and Arizona Rep. Ruben Gallego, right, have been critical of DCCC staff. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

For a party that gained seats, the aftermath of November’s election has resulted in unusually loud griping from Democratic members about the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee, specifically its staff. 

Rep. Tim Ryan said last week that if he were in charge, he’d ask the DCCC staff to reapply for their jobs.

House Democrats Change Rules to Elect Leaders
Campaign, messaging arms to be chosen by full caucus

By Rema Rahman and Lindsey McPherson CQ Roll Call

The House Democratic Caucus decided Thursday that it will fully elect leaders to its campaign and communications arms as lawmakers eye taking back control of the chamber in 2018.

Frustrated Democrats See DCCC Overhaul As Step Toward Electoral Success
Minority leader now supports directly electing DCCC chairman

New York Rep. Kathleen Rice thinks the DCCC hasn't been transparent enough and wants the chairman to be directly elected by the caucus. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

After winning re-election as minority leader Wednesday morning, Nancy Pelosi came out late Wednesday night in support of one of the changes pushed most strongly by her opponents.

In a “Dear Colleague” letter, she embraced the idea of the full caucus directly electing the chairman of the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee. She also said she’d support the creation of five regional vice chairmen.

Challenger Pits Pelosi Against Rank-and-File Democrats
Drama surrounds veteran lawmaker’s bid to retain control of divided caucus

Nancy Pelosi, who has been the top House Democrat since 2003, is facing a challenge from Ohio Rep. Tim Ryan. (CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi puts her leadership position on the line Wednesday morning, facing criticism from rank-and-file Democrats and an opponent agitating for change after three consecutive unsuccessful attempts to retake control of the chamber.

The 76-year-old Californian is expected to prevail by capturing a simple majority in the secret balloting, but some Democrats predict the race could be close. As of Tuesday evening, at least 80 caucus members had publicly committed to Pelosi.