cq-on-congress-podcast

Did the Pentagon weaponize ticks?
CQ on Congress, Episode 162

The House has asked that the Pentagon's inspector general "conduct a review of whether the Department of Defense experimented with ticks and other insects regarding use as a biological weapon between the years 1950 and 1975." (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Immigrant raids could lead to more family separations
CQ on Congress, Episode 161

Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., is one of the lawmakers voicing concerns about the conditions in migrant detention centers. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

The Trump administration says it will round up undocumented immigrants who have missed a court date in an effort to deter others migrants from seeking refuge in the United States. But raids could exacerbate family separations, report CQ Roll Call’s Tanvi Misra and Jinitzail Hernandez, who just returned from visiting one of the largest migrant detention centers in Homestead, Fla., where the government is holding 2,000 teenage immigrants.

Assessing the trade talks with China
CQ on Congress podcast, Episode 160

President Donald Trump announced that no new tariffs will be imposed on Chinese imports during the U.S.-China trade talks. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)

In this episode of CQ on Congress, former U.S. trade negotiator Wendy Cutler explains what each side of the U.S.-China trade talks is looking to gain. Then trade economist Christine McDaniel walks us through how some U.S. companies are coping with the tariffs imposed by the Trump administration. And CQ Roll Call's trade reporter Mark Bocchetti discusses the process that allows U.S. companies to seek exclusions from the tariffs.

How the GOP won by losing on census citizenship question
CQ on Congress podcast, Episode 159

Protesters hold signs at a rally in front of the U.S. Supreme Court, which on June 27, 2019 blocked a citizenship question from being added to the 2020 census. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

GOP-held states with growing immigrant populations, Texas, Florida and Arizona, are more likely to gain House seats following the 2020 Census, as well as additional federal funding, if a citizenship question remains off, as the Supreme Court ordered on June 27. In this episode of the CQ on Congress podcast, CQ Roll Call reporter Michael Macagnone and Bryce Dietrich, a fellow at Harvard's Kennedy School, discuss why Republican lawmakers continue to back President Donald Trump's plan to add it.  

The Pentagon has a leadership vacuum at the top as tensions with Iran rise
CQ on Congress podcast, Episode 158

Acting Defense Secretary Patrick Shanahan, who is stepping aside, will be replaced Monday by Mark Esper, current secretary of the Army. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The departure of acting Defense Department Secretary Patrick Shanahan raises questions about who is advising President Donald Trump, who pulled back a planned military strike on Iran this week, says CQ defense reporter Andrew Clevenger in this episode of the CQ on Congress podcast. And Chris Lu, who served as Barack Obama's liaison to his Cabinet, says Trump's apparent preference for churn among his agency heads gives him more power to direct policy on his own.

Abortion threatens congressional impasse on funding
CQ on Congress podcast, Episode 157

Rep. Norma Torres, D-Calif., referred to some GOP colleagues as "sex starved males" on the House floor, setting off a brief spat. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Democrats' effort to rescind Trump administration anti-abortion policies threatens to hold up government spending bills. CQ Roll Call reporter Sandhya Raman details the debate and surveys how lawmakers are using abortion politics, both in Washington and the states, to rile their voters ahead of next year's election. 

 

Trump denies climate change as his Pentagon prepares for it
CQ on Congress podcast, Episode 156

Former Navy Secretary Raymond Mabus, Jr., urges Congress to address climate change. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

In this episode of CQ on Congress, former Navy Secretary Ray Mabus says President Trump's climate change denial risks an apocalyptic future that will stress the U.S. military. Ben Hulac, author of a forthcoming CQ magazine cover story on how climate change is affecting the Arctic, explains why that could create conflict between world powers.

Lawmakers on impeachment and F-35s to Turkey
CQ on Congress podcast, Episode 155

Special counsel Robert Mueller is seen on a monitor in Russell Building making a statement at the Department of Justice on his investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election on Wednesday, May 29, 2019. Kelly O’Donnell of NBC News listens in the background. CQ Roll Call reporter Todd Ruger discusses the special counsel’s first public statement in two years on the long-awaited Mueller report.. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

In his first public statement after his two-year probe, Robert S. Mueller III, the former special counsel, said this week that he had never considered charging President Donald Trump with a crime as he investigated Russian interference in the 2016 election. That’s emboldened those in Congress who say representatives must read Mueller’s report, which found evidence Trump may have obstructed the special council’s investigation as an impeachment referral. 

[As Turkish leader courts Russia, U.S. prepares to cut ties]

Here’s what House Democrats are saying about impeaching Trump
CQ on Congress podcast, Episode 154

Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., says that President Trump “is engaged in a coverup” and House committee investigations “may take us to place that is unavoidable in terms of impeachment or not but we're not at that place.” (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Democrat Jamie Raskin of Maryland, who sits on the House Judiciary Committee that would lead an impeachment inquiry, says he believes President Donald Trump has committed high crimes, both in obstructing Special Counsel Robert S. Mueller’s investigation and in refusing to cooperate with congressional investigators. CQ Roll Call senior politics reporter Simone Pathé talks about her interviews this week with Democrats from competitive House districts. They told her they are more open to beginning impeachment proceedings because of Trump’s refusal to cooperate with congressional investigators.

Show Notes:

Lawmakers seek solutions in Venezuela, Iran
CQ on Congress podcast, Episode 153

U.S. Vice President Mike Pence (L) shakes hands with Carlos Vecchio (3rd L), a representative of Venezuelan opposition leader Juan Guaido, outside the West Wing of the White House after a meeting January 29, 2019, in Washington, DC. The Trump Administration has imposed sanctions on Venezuelan state-owned oil company in order to put pressure on President Nicolas Maduro to give up his power and step down. (Alex Wong/Getty Images)