cq-on-congress-podcast

Lawmakers seek solutions in Venezuela, Iran
CQ on Congress podcast, Episode 153

U.S. Vice President Mike Pence (L) shakes hands with Carlos Vecchio (3rd L), a representative of Venezuelan opposition leader Juan Guaido, outside the West Wing of the White House after a meeting January 29, 2019, in Washington, DC. The Trump Administration has imposed sanctions on Venezuelan state-owned oil company in order to put pressure on President Nicolas Maduro to give up his power and step down. (Alex Wong/Getty Images)

Higher tariffs on Chinese goods spark call for Congress to intervene
CQ on Congress podcast, Episode 152

The U.S. hiked tariffs on Chinese imports and Beijing threatened to impose countermeasures. The two countries continue negotiations. (U.S. Army Photo by Sgt. Mikki L. Sprenkle/Released)

The continuing damage to businesses and farmers from the trade stand off between China and the U.S. is a sign that Congress needs to reinsert itself into the trade policy-making process again, argues Clark Packard, a trade policy counsel at the R Street Institute, a center-right think tank. He warns that boosting tariffs on Chinese imports "has the potential to spiral out of control.'' And CQ Roll Call's Ellyn Ferguson explains where legislation currently pending in Congress stands.

Why Democrats haven't passed a minimum wage bill
CQ on Congress podcast, Episode 151

Former Vice President Joe Biden is one of several Democratic presidential candidates that support increasing the federal minimum wage to $15 an hour. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Democratic presidential candidates and most House Democrats want to raise the federal minimum wage from $7.25 to $15 an hour by 2024, a proposal David Cooper of the Economic Policy Institute says makes sense. But CQ Roll Call’s Lindsey McPherson explains why some Democrats representing rural areas are holding up the bill.

The GOP's 2020 agenda, or lack thereof
CQ on Congress podcast, Episode 150

President Donald Trump and Vice President Mike Pence arrive to the Capitol to attend the Senate Republican policy luncheons on Jan. 9, 2019. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Jonathan Miller talks about his new CQ Magazine cover story on the Republicans' decision, thus far, to ignore policy proposals in their 2020 planning. Miller found this worries some lawmakers, like Wisconsin Rep. Mike Gallagher, who'd like to see the party offer new ideas.

 

Mueller report’s second act: congressional scrutiny
CQ on Congress podcast, Episode 149

Pages of special counsel Robert S. Mueller III’s report on Russian interference in the 2016 election, which was printed out by House Judiciary staffers on Thursday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

CQ legal affairs reporter Todd Ruger says House Democrats now have plenty of leads from special counsel Robert S. Mueller III’s report to investigate, especially as to whether President Donald Trump sought to obstruct justice.

Assessing the new tax law as April 15 arrives
CQ on Congress podcast, Episode 148

Internal Revenue Service building in Washington (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

 

How Congress helps companies hire foreign workers over Americans
CQ on Congress podcast, Episode 147

Setting sun hits the U.S. Capitol dome. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Why progressives are ready to ditch Obamacare
CQ on Congress podcast, Episode 146

The U.S. Capitol building is seen behind two ambulances last summer. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The 2010 health care law has left tens of millions uninsured, leading to a groundswell of support from the left for a single-payer system, or “Medicare for All.” Health care reporter Mary Ellen McIntire explains why progressives are ready to move on, what it would take politically to get there, and how they would transform American health care.

Big Tech's Breakup With Democrats
CQ on Congress podcast, Episode 145

Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., says it's time to break up tech giants like Google, Facebook and Amazon. (Photo by Sarah Silbiger/CQ Roll Call)

Lawmakers on both sides of the aisle, but especially Democrats, are saying that the government should intervene to rein in, or even break up, tech giants like Amazon, Google and Facebook. CQ technology reporter Dean DeChiaro says an antitrust action would require a novel legal approach focused less on pricing power and more on market dominance, while Patrick Pexton, CQ's tech editor, says the tech industry, long aligned with the Democratic Party, could shift its political loyalties

Show Notes:

Navy spends epically on shoddy ships
CQ on Congress podcast, Episode 144

E8MKBB Pacific Ocean, April 23, 2014 - The littoral combat ships USS Independence (LCS 2), left, and USS Coronado (LCS 4) are underway. (Photo: Alamy)