congressional-baseball

How Poisoned Water Brought Democrats and Republicans Together
Flint lawmaker talks cross-aisle friendships, maintaining sense of urgency after spotlight dims

Rep. Dan Kildee, D-Mich., shares a rare bi-partisan friendship with John Moolenaar, R-Mich., left, that involves an annual sandwich exchange. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Dan Kildee, a Democrat with leadership aspirations, was about to leave the House floor when a Republican colleague pulled him aside with an earnest question: How was the water in Flint?

It’s complicated. Despite miles of replaced pipes, people are still waiting in long lines for bottled water.

House Hopeful Danny O'Connor Talks Congressional Baseball
Ohio special election candidate takes on Republican Troy Balderson next month

If Democrat Danny O'Connor wins a special election in Ohio, he may get drafted for congressional baseball. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

A House hopeful made an appearance at votes Tuesday, shaking hands with a group of young Democratic lawmakers outside the House chamber. They weren’t talking campaign strategy; instead, the chatter focused instead on congressional baseball.

Danny O’Connor is the Democrat running in Ohio’s 12 district for a seat vacated when Rep. Pat Tiberi left Congress to take a job back in Ohio. He had a home state ambassador in Rep. Tim Ryan, who was scooting in and out of the chamber during the vote series to fetch a rotating cast of House Democrats to meet O’Connor. Rep. Joe Kennedy III was also searching for colleagues to meet the candidate, who connected with  Sean Patrick Maloney,  Linda T. Sánchez and others. 

Do You Have What It Takes to Be a Historian on the Hill?
Capitol Hill trivia questions ahead

Ted Williams, right, manager of the Washington Senators, and Rep. Silvio Conte, R-Mass., enjoy the Congressional Baseball Game. Reporters believe this photo is from the late 1960s. (CQ Roll Call file photo)

To be a true Capitol Hill historian, you have to have a Ph.D. in regular order. Or you can just read Roll Call regularly.

Take a stab — pun intended (see question four) — at this Capitol Hill trivia.

Another Big Boost for Hill Security Spending
A year after baseball shooting, Capitol Police keeps growing and cyber-attack worries intensify

A member of the security detail for Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer prepares to let him out of an SUV at the Exxon gas station at Massachusetts Avenue and Second Street Northeast last month. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

At a time when steady significant growth for the Capitol Police looks sure to continue, members of Congress are confessing heightened concern they’ll never be altogether shielded from threats both old-fashioned and high tech — no matter where they are.

The Senate on Monday, and the House three weeks ago, passed bills allocating more than $450 million for the congressional force in the coming year. It would be at least a 6 percent hike and produce a Capitol Police budget one-third bigger than just five years before. No other part of Congress, nor any of its support organizations, has seen anything approaching such generous and sustained increases in recent years.

Podcast: What the Congressional Softball Game Says About Lawmakers
Political Theater, Episode 24

Political Theater

Democrats Score Big in 21–5 Baseball Blowout Over GOP
Steve Scalise makes the game’s first out in feel-good moment of the night

Rep. Mike Bishop, R-Mich., is tagged out by Sen. Christopher S. Murphy, D-Conn., to end the 57th annual Congressional Baseball Game at Nationals Park on Thursday. The Democrats prevailed 21-5. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Democrats continued to show their dominance on the diamond Thursday night with a massive 21–5 win over the Republicans at the 57th annual Congressional Baseball Game. 

“More of a football game than a baseball game, but I think both sides gave it their all,” New York Democratic Rep. Joseph Crowley said of the score after the game. 

Cedric Richmond Isn’t Sure How Much Is Left in the Tank
Democrats’ star hoping another pitcher gets elected in midterms

Rep. Cedric L. Richmond, D-La., is cooled by Rep. Pete Aguilar, D-Calif., after running out a triple, then scoring on an error Thursday night at the Congressional Baseball Game. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Much of the Democrat’s 16-run win Thursday night at the 57th annual Congressional Baseball Game can be attributed to pitcher Cedric L. Richmond. But the game’s most dominant player for the last several years isn’t sure how much longer he can dominate.

When asked if he can keep up his streak year after year, the Louisiana Democrat said, “Absolutely not.”

Congressional Baseball Game Highlights
57th annual Democrats vs. Republicans game for charities at Nationals Park in Washington

Rep. Tim Ryan, D-Ohio, tags out Rep. Fred Upton, R-Mich., at third base during the 57th annual Congressional Baseball Game at Nationals Park on Thursday. The Democrats prevailed 21-5. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Democratic members of Congress beat their Republican counterparts, 21-5, Thursday in the annual Congressional Baseball Game for Charity at Nationals Park in Washington.

Rep. Cedric L. Richmond pitched a complete game for the Democrats, who won 11-2 last year. 

Special Guests Expected at the Congressional Baseball Game
More than 17,000 tickets already sold

Republican fans watch the Congressional Baseball Game at Nationals Park in 2017. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

More than 17,000 tickets have been sold for Thursday’s Congressional Baseball Game as of this morning. And some notable guests may attend.

While President Donald Trump is not expected to be at the game, according to the organizers, the administration will be represented. Mick Mulvaney, director of the Office of Management and Budget and acting director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, is expected to be the Republican’s first base coach.

Senate Appropriations Approves $5M to Pay Interns
New funding approved in the fiscal 2019 Legislative Branch markup

Sen. Chris Van Hollen, D-Md., has been tackling the issue of paying interns in the Senate. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The Senate Appropriations Committee approved $5 million Thursday to compensate the chamber’s interns.

Maryland Sen. Chris Van Hollen teamed up with fellow Democrats Christopher S. Murphy of Connecticut, Brian Schatz of Hawaii and Richard J. Durbin of Illinois, and Republican Sens. Lisa Murkowski of Alaska and Susan Collins of Maine.