congressional-baseball

Rep. Steve Scalise and Roommates Pitch Cooking Show on Twitter
Louisiana Republican will lose his sous chef come January

House Majority Whip Steve Scalise, R-La., speaks during the press conference following the House Republican Conference meeting on Wednesday, Feb. 14, 2018. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

A set of four Republican roommates channeled Julia Child over the weekend with a butter-slathered cooking video.

House Majority Whip Steve Scalise of Louisiana shares a house in Washington with lawmaking colleagues Kevin Brady, Erik Paulsen and John Shimkus. Together they cooked up a cajun feast of blackened redfish, jambalaya and gumbo, with mashed sweet potato casserole on the side.

Remembering Tim Johnson: Congressional Baseball Game Was the ‘Love of His Life’
Former Oxley staffer died at 59 years old

Rep. Joe Barton, R-Texas, center, sets the lineup during a scrimmage between Republican team members in 2016 with Rep. Mike Bishop, R-Mich., right, and coach Tim Johnson, left. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Former staffer and Congressional Baseball Game staple Tim Johnson died Sunday after a decade-long battle with multiple myeloma.

He died at his sister’s house in Leola, Pennsylvania, at 59 years old. He had just celebrated his birthday Oct. 3.

Rep. Scalise Falsely Accuses Eric Holder of Inciting Violence at Georgia Rally
Holder clarified that he urged supporters to be ‘be tough’ against GOP political attacks

Majority Whip Rep. Steve Scalise, R-La., speaks during a press conference with House Republican Leaders in the House Studio Thursday, Sept. 13, 2018. (Sarah Silbiger/CQ Roll Call)

Rep. Steve Scalise apparently took former Attorney General Eric Holder’s words at a campaign rally for Georgia Democratic candidates literally when Holder said, “When they go low, we kick ’em.”

The Louisiana Republican and third-in-line in House GOP leadership said Holder’s comment amounted to a “call for violence” in an op-ed for Fox News published Thursday.

How Joe Barton Struck Out
Retiring Texas Republican was thwarted by his own political instincts

Rep. Joe Barton, R-Texas, faces retirement after a sex scandal. His career in Washington had already reached its peak. (CQ Roll Call)

Leadership be damned, Rep. Joe L. Barton thought. He knew he was right, and as soon as he was convinced of that, hardly anything in the world could move him.

Just a few months into his first term, the Texas Republican was angling for something between protest and revolution. House Democrats had voted to declare themselves the winner of a contested Indiana House race — in Republicans’ eyes, a theft. While his own party’s leadership urged restraint, Barton fumed.

Democrats Demand Oversight on Cohen Plea, Presidential Pardons
Judiciary Committee Dems want more information about investigations into Michael Cohen, other Trump associates

House Judiciary ranking member Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y., and the 16 other Democrats on the committee asked Chairman Bob Goodlatte, R-Va., to conduct oversight over the Justice Department’s plea deal with Michael Cohen, former attorney for President Donald Trump. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Democrats on the House Judiciary Committee want to return to Washington from August recess a week early to address the new allegations that President Donald Trump violated campaign finance laws.

Trump’s former personal attorney, Michael Cohen, implicated the president for directing him to violate campaign finance laws while he pleaded guilty in court in a New York courtroom Tuesday to eight counts of campaign finance, bank fraud and tax fraud.

How Poisoned Water Brought Democrats and Republicans Together
Flint lawmaker talks cross-aisle friendships, maintaining sense of urgency after spotlight dims

Rep. Dan Kildee, D-Mich., shares a rare bi-partisan friendship with John Moolenaar, R-Mich., left, that involves an annual sandwich exchange. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Dan Kildee, a Democrat with leadership aspirations, was about to leave the House floor when a Republican colleague pulled him aside with an earnest question: How was the water in Flint?

It’s complicated. Despite miles of replaced pipes, people are still waiting in long lines for bottled water.

House Hopeful Danny O'Connor Talks Congressional Baseball
Ohio special election candidate takes on Republican Troy Balderson next month

If Democrat Danny O'Connor wins a special election in Ohio, he may get drafted for congressional baseball. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

A House hopeful made an appearance at votes Tuesday, shaking hands with a group of young Democratic lawmakers outside the House chamber. They weren’t talking campaign strategy; instead, the chatter focused instead on congressional baseball.

Danny O’Connor is the Democrat running in Ohio’s 12 district for a seat vacated when Rep. Pat Tiberi left Congress to take a job back in Ohio. He had a home state ambassador in Rep. Tim Ryan, who was scooting in and out of the chamber during the vote series to fetch a rotating cast of House Democrats to meet O’Connor. Rep. Joe Kennedy III was also searching for colleagues to meet the candidate, who connected with  Sean Patrick Maloney,  Linda T. Sánchez and others. 

Do You Have What It Takes to Be a Historian on the Hill?
Capitol Hill trivia questions ahead

Ted Williams, right, manager of the Washington Senators, and Rep. Silvio Conte, R-Mass., enjoy the Congressional Baseball Game. Reporters believe this photo is from the late 1960s. (CQ Roll Call file photo)

To be a true Capitol Hill historian, you have to have a Ph.D. in regular order. Or you can just read Roll Call regularly.

Take a stab — pun intended (see question four) — at this Capitol Hill trivia.

Another Big Boost for Hill Security Spending
A year after baseball shooting, Capitol Police keeps growing and cyber-attack worries intensify

A member of the security detail for Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer prepares to let him out of an SUV at the Exxon gas station at Massachusetts Avenue and Second Street Northeast last month. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

At a time when steady significant growth for the Capitol Police looks sure to continue, members of Congress are confessing heightened concern they’ll never be altogether shielded from threats both old-fashioned and high tech — no matter where they are.

The Senate on Monday, and the House three weeks ago, passed bills allocating more than $450 million for the congressional force in the coming year. It would be at least a 6 percent hike and produce a Capitol Police budget one-third bigger than just five years before. No other part of Congress, nor any of its support organizations, has seen anything approaching such generous and sustained increases in recent years.

Podcast: What the Congressional Softball Game Says About Lawmakers
Political Theater, Episode 24

Political Theater