climate

Cunningham, South Carolina fishermen see consensus on climate change
After talking to Charleston area fishermen Monday, Cunningham introduced a bill in Washington to require a GAO study

South Carolina Rep. Joe Cunningham, left, talks with constituent Taylor Tarvin, who owns a shrimp boat called Miss Paula that the congressman visited while discussing climate change on a tour with local fishermen in Mount Pleasant, S.C., on Monday. (Lindsey McPherson/CQ Roll Call)

MOUNT PLEASANT, S.C. — Nationally, climate change is still not a universally accepted science. But here in the South Carolina Lowcountry, Rep. Joe Cunningham claims there’s bipartisan acknowledgement of global warming as a real and urgent issue.

The freshman Democrat spent Monday with a group of fishermen from his coastline district who have seen the impacts of climate change firsthand.

If Perry leaves Energy, his deputy seems likely to sustain his policies
Rumors of Perry's impending departure put Deputy Secretary Dan Brouillette in spotlight

Energy Secretary Rick Perry is one of President Donald Trump's longest-serving Cabinet members. An Energy Department spokeswoman denied reports that he was planning to step down soon. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The No. 2 man at the Energy Department is primed to carry on the agency’s “energy dominance” agenda should his boss, Energy Secretary Rick Perry, step down.

Perry is preparing to step down before the end of November, Politico and other media outlets reported Thursday, a decision that would end the service of one of President Donald Trump’s longest-lasting Cabinet secretaries. Perry’s departure would likely place Dan Brouillette, the deputy secretary, in charge of the Energy Department.

Supreme Court term to be punctuated by presidential politics
Docket ‘almost guarantees’ court shifting further and faster to the right, expert says

Activists hold up signs at an abortion-rights rally at Supreme Court in Washington to protest new state bans on abortion services on Tuesday May 21, 2019. (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The Supreme Court will confront ideological issues such as immigration and LGBT rights that have sharply divided Congress and the nation in a new term starting Monday that will bring more scrutiny to the justices during a heated presidential campaign season.

In many ways, the nine justices are still settling into a new internal dynamic with two President Donald Trump appointees in as many years. The court had few high-profile cases last term, amid the drama of Justice Brett M. Kavanaugh’s confirmation that gripped the nation and solidified the court’s conservative ideological tilt.

How ‘resilience’ became a politically safe word for ‘climate change’
Both parties increasingly agree on investing in infrastructure upgrades to better withstand extreme weather

Water floods Highway 12 in Nags Head, N.C., as Hurricane Dorian hits the area on Sept. 6. (Mark Wilson/Getty Images file photo)

Climate change remains a deeply divisive term in some corners of Capitol Hill, but lawmakers from both parties are embracing the concept of “resilience” — building infrastructure engineered to better withstand devastating wind and floods associated with a warming planet.

The idea of building infrastructure better equipped to deal with natural disasters is appealing to fiscal conservatives who are loathe to keep spending taxpayer dollars rebuilding federal infrastructure just to see it destroyed again.

Photos of the Week: Impeachment is in the air, but first recess
The week of Sept. 27 as captured by Roll Call’s photojournalists

A coalition of progressive activist groups, including MoveOn.org, hold a rally at the Capitol on Thursday, calling on Congress to impeach President Donald Trump. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

US ambassador with coal ties arrives as UN begins climate talks
Craft could mold process by which the U.S. gets out of the Paris climate agreement

Kelly Craft attends her Senate Foreign Relations Committee confirmation hearing in June. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

As world leaders gathered at the United Nations in New York for a climate change summit Monday, America’s new ambassador to the global body was focused on other business.

“Our warming earth is issuing a chilling cry: stop,” U.N. Secretary General Antonio Guterres said in his opening remarks. Germany announced climate mitigation pledges. Pope Francis delivered a call to action in a video message. French President Emmanuel Macron praised young people for demanding political action to rein in emissions.

Photos: Climate change protesters #ShutDownDC intersections
Photos of the day as captured by Roll Call's photographers

Climate change protesters took to the streets of Washington on Monday. (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call)

A coalition of activists under the umbrella Shut Down DC blocked intersections throughout Washington on Monday morning, saying their aim is to draw attention to climate change.

Traffic was rerouted at intersections, including Massachusetts Avenue and North Capitol Street near Capitol Hill.

Battling inner conflict on Iran, Trump heads to UN session
President must first convince himself of a plan before rallying any coalition

President Donald Trump waves after addressing the media during his arrival at an United Nations General Assembly session last year in New York City. He is back at the annual gathering of world leaders this week. (Stephanie Keith/Getty Images file photo)

President Donald Trump heads to a U.N. General Assembly session in his hometown this week with a new national security adviser and an increasingly complicated situation with Iran. But don’t expect a resolution in New York.

Previous presidents have used the gathering of world leaders to forge coalitions in the face of geopolitical conflict. There is little evidence Trump has any plans to do so.

Capitol Ink | CO2 Congress

Youth climate activists on climate change: Listen to the scientists

Swedish youth climate activist Greta Thunberg, center right, sits with other youth climate activists at a press conference to discuss climate change in Washington on Tuesday September 17, 2019. (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call)

A panel of four youth climate activists appeared before a joint hearing on climate leadership Wednesday, urging members to take action on climate change.