civil-rights

Women’s March Will Go On, Shutdown or Not
National Park Service has a contingency plan if it comes to that

Protesters march down Independence Avenue in Washington during the Women's March on Washington the day after Inauguration Day last year. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The 2018 Women’s March in Washington will move forward as planned on Saturday despite a looming government shutdown.

An estimated 5,500 marchers will gather at the Lincoln Memorial Reflecting Pool at 11 a.m. for a series of speeches before winding their way east down Constitution Avenue and north to the White House gates to advocate for women’s inclusion in the political process.

Opinion: Forgetting What It Means to Be an American
Selective memory of president and supporters imperils the country

What President Donald Trump and his supporters choose to remember is selective and troubling, Curtis writes. (Win McNamee/Getty Images)

The 2004 romantic comedy “50 First Dates” offered a novel, though somewhat implausible, premise — and I don’t mean that Drew Barrymore would find Adam Sandler irresistible. The heroine of the tale, afflicted with short-term memory loss, woke up each morning with a clean slate, thinking it was the same day, with no recollection of anything that happened the day before.

Who knew the president of the United States, most members of a political party and White House staff would suffer from the same condition?

Poll: 44 Percent of Americans Think Trump is a Racist
Four in five Americans said they believe Trump talks without taking much time to consider his words

President Donald Trump speaks as he stops by a Conversations with the Women of America panel at the Eisenhower Executive Office Building on Tuesday. (Alex Wong/Getty Images)

Donald Trump’s rough rhetorical style was thrust under the microscope (again) last week after he called Haiti and parts of Africa “shithole countries” when complaining about their immigrants to the United States, multiple lawmakers who were at the meeting with the president confirmed.

Four in five Americans said they believe Trump talks without taking much time to consider his words, a new poll found.

More Democrats Say They’ll Skip Trump’s State of the Union
Lawmakers cite president’s ‘racist’ comments, say they’ll have ‘state of our union’ event

Rep. Frederica S. Wilson, D-Fla., will not attend President Donald Trump's State of the Union address later this month, joining four other Democrats in protest. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Add two more Democrats to the list of House members catting on President Donald Trump’s State of the Union address later this month.

Reps. Frederica S. Wilson and Pramila Jayapal announced over the weekend they will join three other lawmakers boycotting the event held in the House chamber of the U.S. Capitol.

Supreme Court Split on Ohio Voter Purge Law
Case could have consequences for this year’s midterms

Ohio Rep. Joyce Beatty, second from right, joined rallygoers outside the Supreme Court on Wednesday to protest the Buckeye State’s voter purge law. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

The Supreme Court appeared divided along familiar lines Wednesday as the justices considered how states such as Ohio can remove voters from registration rolls without violating federal laws to protect people who simply choose not to vote.

The case could affect this year’s elections and how states determine who remains on the lists of eligible voters. The justices will decide the case before their term concludes at the end of June, but did little Wednesday to foreshadow how they ultimately would rule.

Booker, Harris Add Historic Diversity to Senate Judiciary
2020 hopefuls are second and third black senators to serve on panel

New Jersey Sen. Cory Booker is the first black man to sit on the Senate Judiciary Committee. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The addition of Democrats Cory Booker of New Jersey and Kamala Harris of California to the Senate Judiciary Committee on Tuesday gave the two potential 2020 presidential hopefuls a big platform, but also a spot in the panel’s history.

Booker becomes the first black man to sit on the committee, which oversees civil rights, voting rights, housing discrimination and other Justice Department enforcement efforts that are seen as crucial to African-Americans. Harris, who is biracial, becomes the second black woman to serve on the panel, after Carol Moseley Braun of Illinois, who left the Senate in 1999.

Opinion: Will African-American Female Leadership Move Into the Spotlight in 2018?
More voices need to be heard

Angela Peoples holds up a sign reading “Don’t Forget: White Women Voted for Trump” at the Women’s March in January. (Courtesy Kevin Banatte/Twitter)

Recy Taylor died at the age of 97 on Dec. 28. Though she was always loved and admired by her family, friends and supporters, it was in the last years of her life that the wider world saw her, really saw this African-American woman from Alabama — her bravery, her strength and her role as a leader in a struggle that has found a loud voice.

Through a book and a film that amplified her story of being kidnapped and raped by white men, and then speaking out about that horrific crime in 1944, when doing so jeopardized her life, Taylor could more than legitimately claim a role as a mother of the movement that has come to be known as #MeToo, one that has stretched from the entertainment and media worlds to the halls of Congress.

Transgender Woman Said Lujan Grisham’s Office Discriminated Against Her
Says she was fired from her internship when it was learned she was transgender

A former intern said Rep. Michelle Lujan Grisham, D-N.M., fired her for being transgender. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

A former intern said she was fired from New Mexico Democratic Rep. Michelle Lujan Grisham’s office for being transgender.

Riley Del Rey told the Santa Fe New Mexican she was fired from the Democrat’s office almost three years ago and is speaking now because she has seen a number of stories about sexual harassment but transgender voices are missing.

Trump’s Tweets Again Spark Courtroom Questions on Travel Ban
“Do we just ignore reality?” one judge asked

President Donald Trump’s anti-Muslim tweets came up in court Friday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

President Donald Trump retweeted three anti-Muslim videos last week, just as two appeals courts prepared to hear arguments on challenges to the latest version of his travel ban. 

The tweets were bound to come up in court — and they did in a big way Friday, when the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 4th Circuit grilled a Justice Department attorney on whether the tweets taint the restrictions on immigration from eight countries, including six that are majority-Muslim. 

Conyers’ Downfall Was Richmond’s ‘Most Trying Moment’
‘You want to hold out hope that he did not do these awful things,’ Congressional Black Caucus chairman says

Rep. Cedric Richmond, D-La., walks down the House steps following a vote in the Capitol on Tuesday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Congressional Black Caucus Chairman Rep. Cedric Richmond called the downfall of Rep. John Conyers one of the most difficult moments in Richmond’s time leading the caucus.

Conyers announced his resignation effective immediately on Tuesday amid reports he sexually harassed multiple women. The Michigan Democrat also said he endorsed his son to run for his seat.