capitol-hill-police

Capitol Police officials say former officer deserved to be fired despite procedural mistakes
Sourgoutsis alleges she was discriminated against because of her gender

Former U.S. Capitol Police Chiefs Kim Dine and Matthew Verderosa, shown here in 2016, testified in the Sourgoutsis trial. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Current and former Capitol Police officials testified Wednesday that former officer Chrisavgi Sourgoutsis deserved to be fired, even though the department made procedural mistakes while she was on the force.

Sourgoutsis alleged the Capitol Police discriminated against her based on her gender in a lawsuit filed in 2016. Her civil trial in federal court continues this week. 

High-ranking Capitol Police official admits he circumvented protocol to fire female officer
Third day of sexual discrimination trial reveals Sourgoutsis’ direct supervisors were not included in firing process

A former Capitol Police officer has alleged she was fired from the force because of her gender. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The male Capitol Police official who recommended the firing of a female officer testified Thursday that he arrived at that decision without ever meeting with her or consulting her direct supervisor.

It was the only termination endorsement Eric C. Waldow made while he was in the role of inspector, he said in D.C. district court on the third day of  the sexual discrimination case brought by the female officer, Chrisavgi Sourgoutsis.

Capitol Police sexual discrimination trial unveils male officers sleeping on the job and a lack of protocol with new employees
Chrisavgi Sourgoutsis has alleged she was fired for infractions male officers got away with

A sexual discrimination trial has unveiled shortcomings in the department’s protocol. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The second day in the case of a female Capitol Police officer who alleges she was fired on the basis of her gender provided details indicating the department failed to follow its own policies regarding the supervision and termination of new employees and allowed male officers who were caught sleeping on duty to remain on the force.

Tuesday’s revelations included several examples of new male officers who were disciplined for violations before their probationary periods ended but not fired. One unnamed male Capitol Police officer was found asleep on duty, leaning back in his chair with a roll of toilet paper wedged between his neck and the back of the chair. Another male officer, cited for sleeping on the job and for a failure to screen at a checkpoint, remains employed by the Capitol Police.

Former Capitol Police chief acknowledges ‘systemic failure’ in supervising new officers
Matthew Verderosa testifies in sex discrimination lawsuit against department

Former Capitol Police Chief Matthew Verderosa acknowledged a “systemic failure” when he was an assistant chief at the agency. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Former Capitol Police Chief Matthew R. Verderosa acknowledged Tuesday there was a “systemic failure” at the department to properly supervise officers on probationary status before he took the top job in 2016. 

Speaking at the sex discrimination trial brought by former Capitol Police officer Chrisavgi Sourgoutsis, who alleges she was wrongfully terminated in 2015 because of her gender, Verderosa said he was concerned she “wasn’t properly evaluated from a performance standard.”

Campus Notebook: Capitol Police sexual discrimination trial set for Monday
Senate Indian Affairs Committee staffer paid to work Washington Redskins training camp

Capitol Police Chief Steven A. Sund. The agency he leads is fighting a sexual discrimination lawsuit. The trial is set to start Monday. (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Are you ready for some football? How about a sexual discrimination case? Whatever it is, Campus Notebook is here for you. 

A sexual discrimination case against the Capitol Police could provide a rare glimpse into the inner workings of the secretive agency and the way women are treated in the male-dominated police force.

Paying respects to Elijah Cummings at the Capitol? Here’s what you need to know
Crowds expected to honor the late Democratic congressman from Baltimore

A memorial for the late House Oversight and Reform Chairman Elijah E. Cummings. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

The public can pay its respects on Thursday, Oct. 24, as Maryland Rep. Elijah E. Cummings lies in state in the Capitol’s Statuary Hall between 1 p.m. and 7 p.m. Public viewing will follow a private ceremony at 11 a.m.

Visitors must enter through the Capitol Visitor Center on the East Front of the Capitol. Attendees can start lining up Thursday morning on First Street Northwest and Southwest, between Constitution and Independence avenues, or on Second Street Northeast and Southeast, between East Capitol Street and Independence Avenue Southeast.

Democratic Rep. Katie Hill denies relationship with congressional staffer
Conservative blog alleged California lawmaker had affair with man who is now her legislative director

California Rep. Katie Hill, a member of House Democratic leadership, has denied allegations she had an improper relationship with her legislative director. (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Rep. Katie Hill on Tuesday denied allegations she had an improper relationship with the man who is her legislative director. The California Democrat said in a statement that her estranged husband is attempting to humiliate her and suggested there is a “coordinated effort” to destroy her.

On Friday, conservative blog RedState published a story detailing Hill’s alleged relationships with 2018 campaign staffers. The first allegation involved a female campaign staffer who entered into a relationship with Hill and Hill’s husband. The second allegation is that Hill also had an extramarital affair with Graham Kelly, who worked for her campaign and is now her legislative director. A relationship with a current congressional staffer would be a violation of House rules.

'There was a lot of blood coming out,' witness says after stabbing near Capitol

A police officer talks on his cell phone at the scene of a stabbing Friday afternoon at the Capitol South Metro station. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Arkansas man arrested for death threats against Sen. Tom Cotton, Rep. Rick Crawford
James Powell, 43, was charged with first-degree terroristic threatening

Sen. Tom Cotton, R-Ark., was one of two Republican Arkansas lawmakers threatened by a man who was arrested earlier this week. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

An Arkansas man was arrested earlier this week for threatening to kill Sen. Tom Cotton and Rep. Rick Crawford, multiple local news outlets reported.

James Powell, 43, was charged with first-degree terroristic threatening, a felony that carries a maximum six-year prison sentence and $10,000 fine.

Photos of the Week: Impeachment is in the air, but first recess
The week of Sept. 27 as captured by Roll Call’s photojournalists

A coalition of progressive activist groups, including MoveOn.org, hold a rally at the Capitol on Thursday, calling on Congress to impeach President Donald Trump. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)