budget

Citing No Regrets About Retiring, Paul Ryan Bets Kevin McCarthy Will Replace Him
Outgoing speaker will not rule out a future presidential bid

Speaker Paul D. Ryan said Thursday he has no regrets about retiring. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Speaker Paul D. Ryan’s Thursday interview with David M. Rubenstein, president of the Economic Club of Washington, D.C., started with an admission that he has no regrets — “none whatsoever” — about retiring. It then diverted into a wide array of topics including his replacement, future plans and policy goals for his last few months in office.

The Wisconsin Republican reiterated his preference that House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy succeed him as speaker when asked about his replacement.

Marc Short Creates Another Void in the White House
Trump has ‘highest turnover of top-tier staff of any recent president,’ professor says

Marc Short, White House legislative affairs director, outside the Senate Republican policy lunches in the Capitol in January. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

White House legislative affairs director Marc Short will leave his post this summer after helping President Donald Trump secure tax cuts, a Supreme Court justice, eliminate part of the Obama-era health law, open the Arctic for energy extraction, and nix a slew of federal regulations.

Short — with his signature shaved head — was the most visible Trump administration official on Capitol Hill, often chatting with reporters as he traversed the hallways going from meetings with leadership and rank-and-file members about the president’s legislative whims and demands. Affable yet firm, Short seemed eager to joust with reporters on cable news, the Hill and even under the blistering summer sun in the White House’s north driveway.

Trump Opens NATO Summit by Pitching a Fit
Energy deal makes Germany ‘captive’ to Russia, U.S. president says

President Donald Trump, here at the Capitol last month, made sure a NATO summit got off to an awkward start. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

President Donald Trump took his war of words with America’s allies to a new level Wednesday, telling NATO’s top official Germany is “captive” to Russia due to a recent energy deal. And he called alliance members “delinquent” on their contributions to NATO’s budget.

Before he departed for the alliance summit in Belgium that starts a week-long trip that also features meetings with U.K. leaders and Russian President Vladimir Putin, Trump said the latter would likely be the “easiest.” He made good on that prediction at the start of the NATO summit, lecturing NATO Secretary-General Jens Stoltenberg in front of media members.

Podcast: How the Summer Spending Stretch Is Shaping Up
CQ Budget, Episode 68

Chairman Richard Shelby, R-Ala., left, and Sen. Roy Blunt, R-Mo., talk before a Senate Appropriations Committee markup June 7, 2018. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Senate Republicans Meet Lavrov in Moscow Ahead of Trump-Putin Summit
Delegation led by Appropriations chairman Shelby

Alabama GOP Sen. Richard Shelby told Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov, shown here at a news conference at the United Nations in January, that the U.S. and Russia might be competitors, “but we don’t necessarily have to be adversaries.” (Drew Angerer/Getty Images file photo)

Senate Appropriations Chairman Richard C. Shelby told Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov Tuesday that he hoped for an improvement in relations between the United States and the Russian Federation.

“We have a strained relationship, but we could have a better relationship between he U.S. and Russia, because there’s some common interests around the world that we hopefully can work together on,” Shelby said, according to video from the meeting in Moscow. “We can be competitors. We are competitors, but we don’t necessarily need to be adversaries.”

Analysis: Top Brow-Furrowing Moments From Trump’s Tax Bash
‘The economy is indeed doing well,’ president says before addressing newsroom murders

President Donald Trump on Friday asked invited guests if they were aware that the U.S. economy is the world’s largest. (Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

This might be remembered as the week President Donald Trump, back in campaign mode, got his sharp-tongued rhetorical groove back. And he kept it up Friday, even while making his first public remarks about a shooting at a Maryland newsroom that occurred roughly 30 miles from the White House and left five dead.

The president came to the White House’s East Room for a long-scheduled event on the six-month-anniversary of a GOP tax law he signed in late December with a prepared statement about the Annapolis shooting at the Capital Gazette office.

Retiring GPO Director Reflects on 38 Years of Public Service
Andrew Sherman helped usher agency into the digital age

Andrew Sherman, right, delivers copies of President George W. Bush’s budget request in February 2008 to House Budget Chairman John M. Spratt Jr., D-S.C., as GPO Chief of Staff Maria S. Lefevre looks on. (Scott J. Ferrell/CQ Roll Call file photo)

After decades of service in the U.S. Government Publishing Office, Andrew M. Sherman is retiring to a simpler life, one without talk of XML files and print-to-digital transformations.

“Well, the pool in my neighborhood closes Labor Day,” Sherman said. “My only plans are to put my feet up after 38 years of work.”

Podcast: Unexpected Spending Trips Appropriators
CQ Budget, Episode 66

Senate Appropriations Chairman Richard Shelby, R-Ala., hopes to pass the first three fiscal 2019 spending bills this week. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

The Senate hit some speed bumps in its push last week to pass a package of spending bills including how to pay for private health care for veterans, says CQ appropriations reporter Kellie Mejdrich.

 

Opinion: 3 Ways to Defeat Dysfunction on the Hill
Recent bipartisan moves offer hope for a return to traditional legislating

The Joint Select Committee on Budget and Appropriations Process Reform must advance some recommendations for change, even if they do not address every issue, Daschle and Lott write. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Four years ago this month, we joined with 27 other Americans to release recommendations to reform how our government works, improve the management of our elections, and promote more civic engagement.

At the time, the Commission on Political Reform, or CPR, was grappling with how to enable our institutions to better function in an era marked by hyperpartisanship. We did not think the tone and dysfunction in Washington could get worse — and yet it has.

From a Scream to a Whisper: Rescissions Push Goes Dark
Clock runs out on GOP effort to assuage Trump’s omnibus displeasure

Sen. Richard M. Burr, R-N.C., arrives in the Capitol on May 15. His decisive vote last week effectively drove a final dagger in a rescissions effort the president had sought. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

After much sound and fury, President Donald Trump’s push to cut nearly $15 billion in unspent funds sitting in federal coffers ended with a whimper last week.

The House-passed rescissions plan was unceremoniously scuttled in the Senate on Wednesday when Republican Sen. Richard M. Burr of North Carolina cast the decisive vote against a discharge petition to advance the measure. With a 45-day clock expiring Friday — and senators long gone for the weekend — Republicans could no longer take advantage of filibuster protections under the 1974 budget law to advance the measure with a simple majority in the Senate.