barack-obama

When Getting ‘Trumped’ Means Extra Dessert
Jim Warlick’s latest project is Presidential Scoops

Ice cream cones sit on the counter at Presidential Scoops as an employee scoops ice cream at the store in Washington. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

When John F. Kennedy ate ice cream, he was on a boat, in a polo shirt, with his mouth open wider than the cone.

It’s executive moments like those that inspire Jim Warlick. The political history buff and JFK fanatic has branched out into frozen treats with Presidential Scoops, just a block from the White House.

Obamas Announce First Round of Endorsements
Includes alumni of his administration

Former President Barack Obama, made his first round of endorsements in the 2018 election cycle. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Former President Barack Obama  waded into the 2018 elections and endorsed a slew of candidates across the country, including some who served in his administration.

Obama and former first lady Michelle made their announcement on Wednesday and said the former president would also focus on redistricting.

Senate Honors Trailblazing Women in Computer Science
Ada Lovelace, Grace Hopper recognized by chamber

Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore., joined with his colleague Deb Fischer, R-Neb., to honor the two computer science pioneers. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Tucked away amid the back and forth of appropriations debate last week, the Senate honored two female trailblazers in math and computer science, adopting resolutions recognizing Ada Lovelace and Grace Hopper.

Sponsored by Oregon Democrat Ron Wyden and Nebraska Republican Deb Fischer, the measures would designate Oct. 9, 2018, as “National Ada Lovelace Day” and honor the life and legacy of Hopper.

Obama’s Push for More Female Leaders Gets Help From Men Acting Out
“Men have been getting on my nerves lately,” ex-president says

Former U.S. President Barack Obama, shown here with former first lady Michelle Obama when their official portraits were unveiled earlier this year, wants more women to take leadership roles.  (Mark Wilson/Getty Images file photo)

OPINION — Former President Barack Obama has not been a headline fixture since he left office. In fact, with a few exceptions, the opposite has been true, maybe because he feels it’s better to keep his political distance in this partisan time or because he’s holding off in order to make a greater impact when he decides to speak up. But last week, Obama did make a bit of news when he encouraged more women to take leadership roles because “men have been getting on my nerves lately.”

Obama certainly could have been talking about certain men who were particularly vexing during his own time in the White House, and have continued to bedevil Democrats (Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, for starters).

Is Trump Building a Nixonian Enemies List?
A Republican chuckled at notion. A Democrat sees ‘authoritarian behavior’

Sens. Tim Kaine, D-Va., left, and James Lankford, R-Okla., right, have very different views of a White House proposal to strip several former Obama administration officials of their security clearances. All have criticized President Donald Trump. Also pictured, Sen. Chris Coons, D-Del. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

A Republican lawmaker chuckled. A Democratic senator nodded in emphatic agreement. And a possible 2020 GOP presidential candidate offered nuanced criticism.

How some lawmakers feel about President Donald Trump’s threat to punish political foes who have criticized him — and whether it reminds them of Richard Nixon — depends on how they feel about the president and his unconventional tactics. It makes the issue a microcosm of the Trump presidency.

Campus Conundrum: For Professors, Trump Requires ‘Constant Adaptation’
‘You teach differently,’ one prof says. ‘You just get creamed,’ notes another.

Protesters hold up illuminated letters spelling "treason" in front of the White House during a rally Wednesday following President Donald Trump’s much-maligned summit with Russian President Vladimir Putin. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

For Donald Trump, last week was perhaps the worst of his presidency. For some Republican lawmakers, his antics struck a nerve. And for political science professors, it will only make things tougher in the classroom.

The U.S. president started his rockiest week yet by referring to Vladimir Putin as a “good competitor,” appearing to agree with the Russian leader over his spy agencies on 2016 election meddling. Trump ended it by advising Putin to “make a deal” or else, warning he could quickly become the Russian strongman’s “worst enemy.”

Goodlatte’s Threat to Hold Strzok in Contempt Most Likely an Empty One
U.S. Attorney for the District of Columbia would decide whether to prosecute the charge

House Judiciary Committee Chairman Bob Goodlatte, R-Va., threatened FBI agent Peter Strzok with contempt of Congress in the opening minutes of Strzok’s first public testimony about his role in 2016 investigations into President Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Just minutes into FBI counterintelligence agent Peter Strzok’s first public testimony Thursday about his involvement in two 2016 FBI investigations involving presidential candidates Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump, Judiciary Committee Chairman Bob Goodlatte threatened Strzok with a contempt of Congress citation.

But if historical precedent is any indication, Goodlatte’s threat to the embattled witness would lead down a long and winding legal road — that would most likely dead-end at the U.S. Attorney for the District of Columbia’s desk.

Trump Signs Executive Action Ending Family Separation
ACLU warns president’s action merely replaces ‘one crisis for another’

Central American asylum seekers wait as U.S. Border Patrol agents take groups of them into custody on June 12, 2018, near McAllen, Texas. (John Moore/Getty Images)

Updated 6:57 p.m. | Bowing to public pressure, President Donald Trump on Thursday signed an executive action ending the practice of separating migrant children from their parents amid a firestorm that saw congressional Republicans break with him.

The president contends Congress must pass legislation addressing the matter for it to be permanently solved given existing laws and court rulings his administration says mandates a process under which migrant children are separated from their parents when caught trying to illegally enter the United States. And it appears families can only be held together for 20 days, unless a federal judge alters a previous ruling placing a limit on detaining migrant families together.

Amid Mounting Criticism, Administration Digs In Over Migrant Separation Policy
'Congress can fix this tomorrow,' DHS secretary says as GOP complaints pile up

Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen is defending the administration's policies at the southern border, despite an ever-widening swath of criticism. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Facing an ever-widening swath of criticism, including from senior Republicans, Trump administration officials dug in Monday on their decision to separate migrant parents and children at the U.S.-Mexico border, signaling they will only end the practice if lawmakers pass immigration legislation.

“Congress and the courts created this problem, and Congress alone can fix it,” Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen said during a contentious press briefing at the White House. “Until then, we will enforce every law we have on the books to defend the sovereignty and the security of the United States.”

Democrats Blast Nielsen’s Family Separation ‘Lie’ as Outrage Intensifies
DHS secretary says ‘we do not have a policy of separating families at the border’

U.S. Border Patrol agents take groups of Central American asylum-seekers into custody last week near McAllen, Texas. (John Moore/Getty Images)

Democrats in Congress accused Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen of lying amid intensifying outrage over a Trump administration policy requiring border agents to separate migrant children from their parents.

Several members of Congress called Nielsen out after she tweeted Sunday evening “we do not have a policy of separating families at the border.”