barack-obama

Trump, McConnell All Smiles, All the Time
President, majority leader say they are on the same page, despite tension

President Donald Trump, left, and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., say their relationship is A-OK. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

Speaker Paul D. Ryan is ready to cancel Christmas recess to get a tax bill done, but President Donald Trump and Majority Leader Mitch McConnell signaled the effort could slip into next year.

Trump on Monday called his relationship with McConnell “very good” amid reports of tension between the two leaders. During a remarkable and rowdy midday joint press conference in the Rose Garden, Trump declared he and McConnell “are probably now … closer than ever before.

Podcast: Trump Upends Obamacare
The Week Ahead, Episode 74

Supporters of the Affordable Care Act celebrate after Supreme Court upholds health care law June 25, 2015.  (Al Drago/ Roll Call File Photo)

Foiled in Congress, President Donald Trump made far-reaching changes to the 2010 health care law that could make insurance more affordable for some, while dramatically raising costs for others, says CQ Health Editor Rebecca Adams. She explains how Trump's moves could affect the insurance marketplace.

Show Notes:

Trump to Stop Paying Obamacare Cost-Sharing Subsidies
Schumer and Pelosi: ‘American families will suffer just because President Trump wants them to’

President Donald Trump speaks as Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.) left, Secretary of Labor Alexander Acosta, third from right, and Secretary of the Treasury Steven Mnuchin, second from right, look on after Trump signed the executive order to loosen restrictions on Affordable Care Act "to promote health care choice and competition." (Alex Wong/Getty Images)

The administration will stop reimbursing health insurers for the 2010 health care law’s controversial cost-sharing reduction payments, the White House said Thursday night.

“Based on guidance from the Department of Justice, the Department of Health and Human Services has concluded that there is no appropriation for cost-sharing reduction payments to insurance companies under Obamacare,” the White House Office of the Press Secretary said in a statement. “In light of this analysis, the Government cannot lawfully make the cost-sharing reduction payments.”

With Signature, Trump Tries to Chip Away at Obamacare
President’s bold promises not reflected in heavily bureaucratic order

President Donald Trump signed an executive order Thursday that could mean major changes for former President Barack Obama’s signature 2010 health care law. Also pictured, Vice President Mike Pence; Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul, sixth from left; North Carolina Rep. Virginia Foxx, third from left; Labor Secretary Alexander Acosta, left. (Alex Wong/Getty Images)

President Donald Trump continued chipping away at his predecessor’s legacy when he signed an executive order Thursday that spells major changes for President Barack Obama’s 2010 health care law. But the order merely directs agencies to craft new rules that one senior official would only say could “possibly” help millions of Americans despite Trump’s bold promises.

Trump called the order a “historic announcement” and promised it would come at zero cost to federal coffers. During a signing ceremony at the White House, he also promised it would bring more affordable coverage to “millions,” and said plans would be available “all across state lines” with competition among providers that he promised will be “staggering.”

Opinion: The Language of Diplomacy, Democracy — and Division
Trump’s last thought is bringing people together

President Donald Trump’s tweets, words and sneers reveal a new American character, one absent moral authority and dependent on division, Mary C. Curtis writes. (Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

“He was a war hero because he was captured. I like people who weren’t captured,” then long-shot candidate Donald Trump said in 2015 of Sen. John McCain’s service and time as a prisoner after his plane was shot down by North Vietnamese troops in 1967. It was a quote that many thought would end Trump’s White House dreams.

That it did not slow the Trump train was a clear sign that something fundamental was broken in America’s definition of what it means to be a patriot.

Opinion: The Terror Within — Those Who See Danger in Diversity
Focus should be on bringing America together

White nationalists and neo-Nazis exchange insults with counterprotesters on Aug. 12 in Charlottesville, Va. Americans are eager to fight foreign enemies but they often ignore signs of terror from within, Curtis writes. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images File Photo)

It was a stirring message of unity. On Monday, 16 years after the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks on American soil that saw planes flown into the Twin Towers and the Pentagon, and brave passengers divert one into a Pennsylvania field, President Donald Trump honored the memories of the dead and the heroics woven through the actions of so many.

At a 9/11 commemoration ceremony at the Pentagon, Trump recalled that moment: “On that day, not only did the world change, but we all changed. Our eyes were opened to the depths of the evil we face. But in that hour of darkness, we also came together with renewed purpose. Our differences never looked so small, our common bonds never felt so strong.”

White House Brushes Off Calls for Updated Authorization of Military Force
Despite bipartisan interest in new AUMF, administration says it’s not happening

House Speaker Paul D. Ryan on Thursday called for a new authorization for use of military force, before the White House said it did not support such a measure. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Despite calls from members of both parties, President Donald Trump will not propose an updated authorization for use of military force measure to cover ongoing U.S. operations against groups such as al-Qaida, the Islamic State and others, a White House National Security Council official said Thursday.

White House officials have concluded they have ample legal authorities to continue conducting such military missions.

Republicans Urge Trump to Let Congress Take Lead on DACA
Leaders and rank-and-file members want president to exercise caution

Immigration rights activists chant during their May Day march to the White House to voice opposition to President Donald Trump’s immigration policies on May 1. He is expected to announce his decision on an Obama-era immigration program on Tuesday. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Even as President Donald Trump readies his announcement on whether he will end Barack Obama’s program that shields from deportation undocumented individuals who came to the United States before their 16th birthday, many Republicans are urging him to let Congress handle it.

Some top White House aides for months have urged Trump to nix deportation relief and work permits for around 800,000 people enrolled in the 2012 Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, known as DACA. After months of internal West Wing debate, the president is poised to do so.

On Venezuela, White House Opts for Further Sanctions
Trump continues to follow pattern of his predecessor, Obama

President Donald Trump disembarks Air Force One on Aug. 18. On Friday, he sanctioned Venezuela’s Maduro regime. (SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)

Trump Shares Race-Baiting Image After Calling for Unity
Image shows him slowly covering country’s first African-American president

President Trump retweeted this image on Thursday morning, one day after calling for national unity. (Image created from screengrab)

Updated at 11:41 a.m. Less than 24 hours after calling for national unity after the racially tinged violence in Charlottesville, President Donald Trump shared an image with racial undertones with his 36.6 million Twitter followers.

The president, during an aggressive and defensive morning tweetstorm, retweeted an image playing off Monday’s eclipse showing himself and former President Barack Obama. In it, Trump’s head and torso slowly cover more and more of Obama’s until the country’s first African-American president is no longer visible.