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‘Amnesty Don’ returns? Trump curiously challenges his conservative base
GOP strategist: ’He runs the risk of the movement passing him by‘ if they feel betrayed

Supporters of the so-called DREAM Act march to the Capitol on March 5, 2018, to call on Congress to pass the legislation. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The timing, to say the least, was curious. Even by President Donald Trump’s unpredictable standards.

First, he angered his conservative base with a Saturday pitch to end a partial government shutdown that included temporary protections for the so-called Dreamer population. The next day, the president, once dubbed “Amnesty Don” by a popular far-right news site, made a surprising — even defiant — return.

Senate sets up Thursday test votes on ending shutdown, but no deal in sight
Senators will vote on amendments featuring Trump's immigration proposal as well as a continuing resolution

Senate leaders have a deal to hold test votes on legislation that could end the government shutdown. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer have announced an agreement for a pair of test votes Thursday afternoon on government funding legislation.

But it may not get lawmakers any closer to a deal to re-open the closed portions of the federal government.

Has the shutdown changed Trump’s political standing?
The president’s political base seems to be staying put, but the danger for him is outside that realm

Approval rating for President Donald Trump are not noticeably eroding because of the shutdown, but other perils remain for his political standing. (George LeVines/CQ Roll Call file photo)

ANALYSIS — Even Donald Trump knows he is in a disturbingly deep political hole.

That’s why he went on television Saturday to offer his version of a “compromise” to Democrats. He is trying to blame House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and her party for the partial government shutdown and to paint them as intransigent and extreme.

Shutdown could cost federal workers second paycheck
CQ Budget Podcast, Episode 95

Members of the Association of Flight Attendants participate in the National Air Traffic Controllers Association rally to “Stop the Shutdown” in front of the Capitol on Thursday, Jan. 10, 2019. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

The House and Senate are poised to consider legislation that could end the partial government shutdown — if the competing bills had any chance of passing both chambers, explains CQ budget and appropriations reporter Kellie Mejdrich. Listen for the latest details on how lawmakers are greeting President Donald Trump's immigration-related  offer.

Warner asks if Trump is following law regarding exceptions from shutdown
Virginia senator sends letters to handful of Cabinet departments

Sen. Mark Warner, D-Va., is asking whether the Trump administration is following the law in implementing the shutdown. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

A senior senator is now asking whether the Trump administration has been complying with federal law in implementing the partial government shutdown, now entering its fifth week.

Democratic Sen. Mark Warner, whose Virginia constituents include many federal employees in the national capital region, has sent a series of letters to key departments raising some doubts about whether President Donald Trump and his administration is in compliance with the Antideficiency Act.

White House, Dems can’t even agree on status of potential shutdown talks
On 32nd day, Trump spox says Pelosi ’refuses’ to chat. Her office says she has no WH invite

Garbage overflows a trash can on the National Mall across from the White House on Jan. 1. Weeks later, President Donald Trump and Speaker Nancy Pelosi aren’t even talking directly about ending the government shutdown. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

The White House and Speaker Nancy Pelosi began the 32nd day of the government shutdown bickering about invitations to talk as no new negotiations are planned amid a stalemate with no end in sight.

Democrats on Saturday rejected a proposal that would trade temporary protections for undocumented migrants under the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, or DACA, for Donald Trump’s desired $5.7 billion for a southern border wall before the president even began describing it in a late-afternoon address.

Trump raises possibility of amnesty, a move that could further infuriate his base
President also says he won’t insist on a reform bill that would include funds to deport millions here illegally

President Donald Trump, flanked from left by Sen. John Barrasso, R-Wyo., Sen. John Thune, R-S. Dak., Vice President Mike Pence, Sen. Roy Blunt, R-Mo., and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., stops to speak to the cameras following his lunch with Senate Republicans in the Capitol on Wed. Jan. 9, 2019. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

President Donald Trump Sunday raised the possibility of amnesty for  hundreds of thousands of undocumented migrants who came to United States as children, a move that could further rankle his conservative base.

The announcement, via Twitter, comes a day after far-right groups panned immigration policy changes he proposed as a way out of the partial government shutdown.

White House flashes urgency on shutdown — but actual goal is murky
Do Trump and Pence want to ‘resolve this’ or blame Dems for missed paychecks?

President Donald Trump and Vice President Mike Pence arrive for lunch with Senate Republicans in the Capitol on Jan. 9. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

ANALYSIS | Though faint, a crucial missing element to ending a partial government shutdown in its 29th day, was almost visible Saturday: Senior White House officials flashed a sense of urgency to end their standoff with Democrats.

But what was less clear on a cold and damp evening in Washington was whether White House officials bucked their own views about the stalled talks because they are eager to end the stalemate or eager to blame Democrats if nearly one million furloughed federal workers don’t get paid again next Friday.

Trump offers trade of Dreamers-for-wall that Democrats quickly reject
Shutdown likely to plod on with no end in sight as White House downplays economic impact

President Donald Trump floated a border security and immigration package Saturday he says would help “Dreamers” and allow him to build a U.S.-Mexico border barrier. But Democrats insantly panned it, and the partial government shutdown will drag on with no breakthrough. (NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images)

President Donald Trump on Saturday pitched what he described as a plan that could end a partial government shutdown — but Democrats made their opposition clear before he uttered a single word about it.

His new offer amounted to a somewhat surprising  and sudden reversal for Trump and senior White House officials. That is because earlier this week, a senior White House official indicated the president was opposed to making a new offer unless House and Senate Democrats made the next move. It also appeared insufficient for Democrats as furloughed federal workers begin lining up at food banks and came amid worries about the shutdown’s effect on an already slowing U.S. economy.

Trump expected to float DACA deal in order to reopen government
Move would follow talks with McConnell and work by Pence, Kushner

Vice President Mike Pence and White House senior adviser Jared Kushner, have been working on crafting the president’s proposed compromise. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

UPDATED 2:19 p.m. | President Donald Trump is expected to announce Saturday afternoon that he would sign legislation to extend protections to Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals recipients and individuals with Temporary Protected Status in exchange for the $5.7 billion for border security money that he has wanted for a southern border wall, a source involved in planning the announcement confirmed.

As always, however, nothing is official until the president himself actually makes the public commitment. Trump is now scheduled to make his border security-shutdown announcement at 4 p.m., Eastern time, Saturday.