2020

Legislative Agenda Takes Back Seat to Trump’s ‘Beautiful Apartment’
Former Jeb Bush aide: ‘One step forward, one step back’

President Donald Trump opted against selling his legislative agenda in an address to supporters in Phoenix on Tuesday. (Scott Olson/Getty Images)

President Donald Trump roared, blamed, boasted, omitted and obfuscated Tuesday night at a campaign rally in Phoenix, but there was one thing he decided against doing: selling his stalled legislative agenda.

A night after delivering a measured and somewhat-detailed prime-time address that laid out his new counterterrorism-focused Afghanistan strategy, Trump’s criticism of the news media, his increasingly visible insecurities and his fixation on his political base took over just minutes into his remarks in the Valley of the Sun.

Fact Check: What Trump Stretched, Omitted and Ignored in Phoenix
President used his own version of events to fire up a friendly crowd

On Tuesday night, President Donald Trump uttered a string of false and questionable statements during a campaign rally in Phoenix. (Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

President Donald Trump’s volatile Tuesday campaign rally in Phoenix was full of misleading statements, from his handling of the Charlottesville, Virginia, racial unrest and media coverage of his presidency to Revolutionary War- and Confederate-era statues and the Senate’s rules.

The omissions, exaggerations and stretching of the truth ranged from the trivial to outright misrepresentations. Some aspects of the speech might even complicate the pursuit of his own legislative agenda.

Trump Threatens Shutdown, Attacks GOP Senators During Angry Rally
President on Sen. Flake: ‘Nobody knows who the hell he is’

Protesters chant and wave signs across the street from the Phoenix Convention Center as President Donald Trump holds a rally inside on Tuesday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Updated at 9:40 a.m. An angry and defiant President Donald Trump used a Tuesday campaign rally to threaten a government shutdown, slam two Republican senators in their home state, and pour rhetorical gasoline on racial tensions he has twice stoked since the deadly Charlottesville, Virginia, white supremacist protests.

Trump stuck to his staff’s script at the start of a rally in Phoenix, reading prepared remarks from a teleprompter just as he did during a stoic speech the night before to announce his Afghanistan policy. But it didn’t last, with the president appearing to put even more distance between himself and mainstream Republicans and even some members of his own Cabinet.

Tim Ryan: ‘We’ll See’ About White House Run
Ohio congressman asked in New Hampshire about his long game

Rep. Tim Ryan, D-Ohio, said he is focused on helping “forgotten America” and workers displaced by globalization. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Ohio Rep. Tim Ryan did not rule out a White House run when asked over the weekend in New Hampshire if he would pursue the presidency in 2020.

Ryan was invited to speak at New Hampshire’s Young Democrats’ cookout last week, the latest in a round of speeches and campaigning across the country.

Trump Is Quickly Running Out of GOP Factions to Alienate
Republican strategist: ‘He’s basically crossing out all of his allies’

President Donald Trump’s ouster of White House chief strategist Steve Bannon is seen by some as his first major slight to his conservative base. (SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)

President Donald Trump is running out of Republican Party factions to offend and alienate after firing Steve Bannon, the White House chief strategist who was a bridge to the president’s conservative base.

Along with Friday’s blow to his base, a defensive and sometimes erratic Trump in the past few weeks alone has attacked once-supportive business leaders, GOP lawmakers and voters eager to distance themselves from far-right and white supremacist protesters in Charlottesville, Virginia. He’s also lashed out at Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, a key player in any effort to push forward his legislative agenda.

Opinion: Stuck on the Back Bench? Why Not Run for President
Last House member to win presidency was in 1880 — it was an accident

An engraving of President James A. Garfield’s assassination. Not since Garfield has a sitting House member so much as won an electoral vote in a presidential election. (Engraving from Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper)

No sitting House member has won an electoral vote for president since 1880, when Ohio’s James A. Garfield captured the White House — and he didn’t even mean to run for the job.

In fact, the Ohio legislature had just voted to appoint Garfield to a Senate term — for which he would have been seated in March 1881 — when the GOP met in Chicago to pick its nominee for the presidency in the summer of 1880.

John Delaney Running for President in 2020
Maryland Democrat won't seek re-election to House

The field to replace Maryland Rep. John Delaney in 2018 is already crowded. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Maryland Democratic Rep. John Delaney announced Friday afternoon he’s running for president in 2020. He won’t run for re-election or for governor in 2018.

Shortly after the House recessed for its August break, The Washington Post published an op-ed by the third-term congressman detailing why he’s running. He also released a nearly six-minute video that opens with him talking about President Donald Trump.

Trump Accuses Voting Officials of Hiding Something
At first vote commission meeting, accusations surround data claims

President Donald Trump speaks while flanked by Kansas Secretary of State, Kris Kobach, left and Vice President Mike Pence during the first meeting of the Presidential Advisory Commission on Election Integrity in the Eisenhower Executive Office Building. (Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

President Donald Trump kicked off the first meeting of a panel he has tasked with probing his own voter fraud claims by questioning why some states are refusing to turn over voting data to his administration.

“I’m pleased that more than 30 states have already agreed to share the information with the commission and the other states that information will be forthcoming,” Trump said. “If any state does not want to share this information, one has to wonder what they’re worried about.”

New Poll Shows Lots of Bad News for Trump
Americans express dislike for GOP health bill, would rather have Obama or Clinton as president

President Donald Trump delivers his address to a joint session of Congress on Tuesday, Feb. 28, 2017. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

A new Public Policy Polling (PPP) survey finds the bad news coming for President Donald Trump from several directions, with the only positive being his supporters holding steady behind him.   

As Trump advocates for a repeal of the Affordable Care Act, with replacement to come later, in the wake of the latest failure to pass a health bill in the Senate, Americans aren’t on board. Only 35 percent supported repealing the law and starting over, versus 58 percent in support of keeping what works and fixing what doesn’t.

Wait — Now Caitlyn Jenner Is Running For Senate?
Transgender Republican says she's considering running in California

Caitlyn Jenner attends the Moschino Spring/Summer 17 Menswear and Women's Resort Collection during MADE LA at L.A. Live Event Deck on June 10, 2016 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Kevin Winter/Getty Images)

Caitlyn Jenner, Olympic gold medalist and one of the highest-profile transgender Americans, is mulling a run for the Senate in California, she told a New York radio interviewer.

Jenner has made a name as virtually the only prominent transgender Republican. She has opposed some Republican initiatives against transgender rights, like President Donald Trump's rescinding of the right of transgender students to access the correct bathrooms at schools. She called that change “a disaster,” “from one Republican to another.”