2017

Opinion: Figure It Out, Mr. President
Congress isn’t built to just do what Donald Trump says

President Donald Trump must choose if he wants to be a hardcore anti-establishment president or a smart deal-maker, Allen writes. (Scott Olson/Getty Images) (Scott Olson/Getty Images)

If it were up to President Donald Trump — and a lot of Americans — Congress might not exist. After all, the legislative branch is the kind of inert obstacle that a disruptor business executive doesn’t have to contend with as he innovates and improvises in the private sector. 

Alas, for Trump, the Founding Fathers believed that wild swings in direction could tear a fragile nation asunder. They made it difficult for a president — any president — to rewrite public policy, push the nation to war or enter into treaties.

Analysis: 5 Ways Republicans Can Finish Health Care Overhaul
No path is a slam dunk, some options have a better chance than others

House Speaker Paul D. Ryan conducts a news conference with members of the GOP caucus on Capitol Hill on April 6 to announce a new amendment to the health care bill to repeal and replace the 2010 law. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Republicans have promised their effort to repeal and replace the 2010 health care law is alive and kicking. And they’re likely to keep going at it until they pass a bill or get elected out office. 

There are at least five different legislative paths for getting a health care overhaul passed before next year’s midterm elections — some more viable than others and none guaranteed to work without support from a majority of Republicans.

White House Plans Week of Activities as Trump’s 100th Day Approaches
President still lacks a big legislative victory amid record low approval ratings

President Donald Trump prepares to sign an executive order last week in Wisconsin aimed at bringing jobs back to American. His 100th day in office is fast approaching without a legislative win. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)

Updated at 8:41 a.m. | The White House has prepared an action-packed week for President Donald Trump ahead of his 100th day in office, including the unveiling of the “principles” behind his tax overhaul plan and more executive orders.

Trump and his senior staff are gearing up to make the case it will be the most productive 100 days for any president in 84 years. Democrats, meanwhile, will be pushing their position — that the 45th president has spent his first few months in office breaking his campaign promises.

Shutdown Under GOP Control Could Be Historic
Federal funding gaps rare under unified government

Not since President Jimmy Carter’s administration have funding gaps occurred when Congress and the executive branch were unified under one party. (CQ Roll Call File Photo)

If the Republican majorities in the House and Senate are unable to get legislation to President Donald Trump’s desk to keep the government running beyond an April 28 deadline, it could be a fairly historic political moment.

Not since President Jimmy Carter’s administration have a Congress and an executive branch unified under one party seen government funding gaps occur, according to the Congressional Research Service.

GOP Lawmakers Pushing for Nuclear Waste Facility in Nevada
Yucca Mountain repository project halted by Obama administration.

A “no trespassing” sign warns people to stay away from a proposed nuclear waste dump site at  Yucca Mountain in Nevada. (David McNew/Getty Images file photo)

Republicans on the House Energy and Commerce Committee have released a discussion draft for a bill that would create incentives to put the shuttered Yucca Mountain repository on track to become the nation’s main nuclear waste disposal site.

The draft text to amend the Nuclear Waste Policy Act is the first of many steps lawmakers must take to bring the project online again after the Trump administration expressed a willingness to re-engage on the issue following the project’s halt by the Obama administration in 2010.

Photos From the Science March, on Earth Day
Protesters came to D.C. on Saturday in support of science

Marchers — including Bill Nye the Science Guy, at center — lead the March for Science down Constitution Avenue in Washington on Earth Day, Saturday, April 22. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Thousands of pro-science and environmental activists rallied on the National Mall before marching toward the Capitol on Saturday, the 47th observation of Earth Day. The march in Washington was accompanied by other science marches across the U.S. and world. It was organized to show support for the scientific community at a time when its members, and supporters, say they feel threatened by the policies and potential policies of President Donald Trump.

Capitol Ink | 115th Congressional Highway

Trump Administration Plans to Roll Out Tax Plan Next Week
Unveiling would join government shutdown threat and health care re-try on week’s docket

President Donald Trump delivers his address to a joint session of Congress on Feb. 28. He plans to roll out his long-promised tax reform plan next week. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

By JOHN T. BENNETT and LINDSEY McPHERSON, CQ Roll Call

A government shutdown deadline, maybe a second try at pushing a health care overhaul bill through the House, an image-focused president approaching his 100th day. And, now, a White House tax reform plan.

Coffman Gets Second Democratic Challenger
Aurora attorney said incumbent’s support of health care repeal motivated him

Rep. Mike Coffman, R-Colo., received a second Democratic challenger. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Nancy Pelosi Misses George W. Bush
House minority leader says she’d work with Republicans on health care if repeal is off the table

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., said she and President George W. Bush did work work together despite disagreements (file photo CQ Roll Call).