2016

Nadler Wants to Hear From ‘Political Lackey’ Whitaker as First Order of Business
Acting AG’s only qualification seems to be ‘hatchet man to destroy the Mueller investigation,’ Nadler says

New York Democratic Rep. Jerrold Nadler, the likely incoming chairman of the House Judiciary Committee, said reports that President Donald Trump was involved in negotiations over hush money payments before the 2016 election to two women he allegedly had affairs with could constitute an impeachable offense. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The top Democrats who will be in charge of conducting oversight on the Trump administration have begun laying out a rigorous investigative plan, they said over the weekend.

Rep. Jerrold Nadler, the presumed next chairman of the House Judiciary Committee, said the first official his committee will want to hear from is new acting Attorney General Matt Whitaker, whom the New York Democrat called a “political lackey” bent on undermining the Russia investigation.

Donald Trump’s Trans-Atlantic Tweetstorm on Air Force One
President said he was focused on ‘the world.’ He spent hours attacking domestic foes

President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump step off Air Force One on Oct. 30 in Pittsburgh. On Friday, the president fired off a number of tweets from the plane while traveling with his wife to Paris. (Shealah Craighead/White House via Flickr)

President Donald Trump assured reporters as he left the White House Friday morning for Paris he was “thinking about the world.” Only, he wasn’t.

The president and first lady Melania Trump boarded Marine One just before 9:30 a.m. and lifted off to link up with Air Force One a few minutes later. By 10 a.m., the executive jet was wheels up for a diplomatic trip to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the end of World War I.

Three Things to Watch When Trump, Putin Land in Paris
Analysts: ‘Trump is operating from an assumption that he can bully our allies’

President Donald Trump and French President Emmanuel Macron attend a Bastille Day military parade on the Champs-Elysees on July 14, 2017 in Paris. Macron will host Trump and other world leaders this weekend to mark the 100th anniversary of World War I Armistice Day. (Thierry Chesnot/Getty Images)

Three days after Republicans lost control of the House, President Donald Trump departed Friday for a diplomatic weekend in Paris that will put him face-to-face with Russian President Vladimir Putin as Democrats with their newfound House majority prepare to explore that relationship more deeply.

Trump campaigned on warming relations with Moscow after things chilled under former President Barack Obama, and kept up that hope for much of his first year in office. But lately, even the 45th president has shown with Putin, expressing doubt that things will get better anytime soon. Trump’s administration has repeatedly implemented sanctions and other tough-on-Russia policies that have further chilled relations.

The ‘Open-Book’ President Lays Out His ‘War-Like Posture’ Plan
‘Them being in the majority, I’m just going to blame them,’ Trump says of Dems

President Donald Trump walks toward Marine One from the Oval Office on Oct. 12. He sent several clear signals about his re-election messaging the day after the midterm elections cost his part the House. (Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

ANALYSIS | “I think I am an open book,” President Donald Trump said Wednesday. He made good on that pledge during a roller coaster press conference when he made clear he is spoiling for a “war” with House Democrats and the media.

Trump fired a shot across the bow, warning Democrats if they launch investigations into him, he will immediately go into a “war-like posture” that will ensure “nothing is done” in Washington. He sparred with reporters, barking at several to sit down while calling a CNN journalist a disgrace. He talked over reporters trying to ask questions and called an African-American PBS reporter’s question “racist.”

The Replacements: Trump Has No Shortage of Candidates to Follow Sessions
A Mueller probe skeptic and several GOP senators all make the list

Then-Sen. Jeff Sessions, R-Ala., endorses Donald Trump to be the Republican nominee for president during a campaign rally at Madison City Schools Stadium in Madison, Ala., on Feb. 28. 2016. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

There is no shortage of candidates to replace Jeff Sessions as attorney general, and President Donald Trump could even again turn to the Senate.

Sessions and Trump clashed almost from the start, with the president even admitting he gave the former Alabama lawmaker the job out of a sense of loyalty. Sessions was the first GOP senator to endorse Trump’s 2016 White House candidacy. As Democrats warn of a constitutional crisis, the president will get to pick a nominee this time for other reasons.

Health Care, Anti-Trump Message ‘Won’t Suffice’ for 2020 Dems
Another race largely about the president ‘not good news for Democrats,’ expert says

Former Vice President Joe Biden speaks at the Nevada Democrats early voting rally at the Culinary Workers Union Local 226 in Las Vegas on Oct. 20. He is mulling a 2020 presidential bid. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Democrats used a message built on health care and criticizing Donald Trump’s brash approach to the presidency to take back the House, but experts say that won’t be enough to defeat the president in 2020.

“This election is about health care,” House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., who could be speaker come January, said Tuesday at a news conference alongside Democratic House Campaign Committee chairman Ben Ray Luján that amounted to her closing pitch to voters.

Voters Send Mixed Signals About Trump with Split Decision
Uncertain how president governs with Dem House, GOP Senate

President Donald Trump speaks during a campaign rally at the Las Vegas Convention Center on September 20, 2018 in Las Vegas, Nevada. (Ethan Miller/Getty Images)

Voters sent mixed messages Tuesday about Donald Trump’s chaotic and self-described “nationalist” presidency, handing Democrats control of the House while expanding Republicans’ Senate majority.

Democratic control of the House and Republican control of the Senate likely ends the latter’s push for additional tax cuts and opens a several months-long window for some kind of sweeping bipartisan deal on infrastructure or immigration somewhat possible.

Trump Made Midterms a Tribal Brawl by Fighting Back Over Kavanaugh
President acknowledges election is a referendum on his turbulent, tribal tenure

President Donald Trump nominated Brett Kavanaugh, above with his family, to replace then-Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy in the East Room of the White House on July 9. (Sarah Silbiger/CQ Roll Call file photo)

ANALYSIS | What ended Monday night inside an arena in southeast Missouri began in earnest on the White House’s South Lawn on Oct. 2. That’s when President Donald Trump decided to do what has defined his presidency and three years on the political stage: He fought back.

Trump used a six-day, eight-state, 11-rally barnstorming tour to close out the midterms campaign season by going not just partisan but tribal. His campaign-ending rally in Cape Girardeau was his third stop of the day — and everywhere the president went Monday, he couldn’t stop telling anyone who would listen that the final week of the 2018 campaign reminded him of the 2016 one when he shocked the world by defeating Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton.

Congressional Leaders Warn of Democratic Check on Trump Presidency
McConnell frets that unfettered pipeline of judges will be halted

Florida Gov. Rick Scott (R), left, who is running for the U.S. Senate, and Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., conduct a rally at Skyline Attractions in Orlando on November 2, 2018. Graham has been active in campaigning to preserve the GOP Senate majority, which GOP leaders warned Monday was at risk.  (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Republican leaders pitched their closing midterm argument Monday: that Democratic gains would mean a check on the agenda of President Donald Trump, including the unimpeded seating of conservative judges, and a halt to the president’s border wall.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said his and the president’s efforts to “remake the federal judiciary would come to a screeching halt if there was a Majority Leader [Charles E.] Schumer.”

Trump: Democrats Will ‘Blame Russia’ if They Lose Midterms
President in Big Sky Country: Dems would ‘invite caravan after caravan of illegal aliens’

President Donald Trump speaks during a campaign rally at the Las Vegas Convention Center on September 20, 2018 in Las Vegas, Nevada. He was in Belgrade, Montana Saturday for the first of two rallies as he barnstorms the country in a final midterms push. (Photo by Ethan Miller/Getty Images)

President Donald Trump ramped up his pre-midterm rhetoric at a rally Saturday in Big Sky Country, claiming that if Democrats do poorly in Tuesday’s elections, they will simply “blame Russia.”

His final-days campaign swing also has featured provocative comments about immigration, the economy and Democrats — and a litany of false statements. In October alone, the Washington Post's Fact Checker staff found he said over 1,000 false or misleading statements; CNN calculated he uttered 81 false statements at a rally this week alone. It’s all part of his strategy to rev up his conservative base to drive up Republican vote counts in key districts and states.