2016

An Immigrant’s Path to Congress: Ruben Kihuen’s First Year in Photos
Roll Call looks at the Nevada Democrat’s journey from the campaign trail to D.C.

OCT. 19, 2016: Ruben Kihuen, then a Democratic candidate for Nevada’s 4th District, shakes hands with demonstrators in front of the Trump International Hotel Las Vegas during the Culinary Union’s Wall of Taco Trucks protest — the day of the final presidential debate. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Every two years, a new crop of freshmen descends on Washington and every two years, Roll Call follows one such member through their first year. 

For the 2016 election, Nevada Rep. Ruben Kihuen was one of only several Democrats to unseat a House Republican. His story is similar to those of millions of Americans — his family came to the U.S. seeking a better life — but on Nov. 8, 2016, he became the first formerly undocumented person to be elected to Congress (along with New York Democratic Rep. Adriano Espaillat, who was elected the same day). Born in Guadalajara, Mexico, Kihuen’s dreams of playing professional soccer were dashed by an untimely injury. It was then that he turned his attention to politics. 

Report: Former Challenger to Admit He Took Payment From Brady Campaign
Former challenger will plead guilty to hiding $90,000 payment

An attorney for Rep. Robert Brady, D-Pa., disputed that Brady’s campaign paid off an opponent to drop out of their 2012 race. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Booker Tacks Toward Democratic Party’s Base
Liberals eye New Jersey senator warily over ties to Wall Street and drug companies

New Jersey Sen. Cory Booker speaks Wednesday during Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders’ event to introduce the so-called Medicare for All Act of 2017. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

New Jersey Sen. Cory Booker worked on burnishing his liberal credentials on economic and health care policy this week, which could appeal to his Democratic Party’s skeptical base. 

The first-term senator is considered among the many potential Democrats in the chamber who could run for president in 2020. But liberals are wary of him because of what they see as his ties to financial industries.

Second Meeting of Trump Election Commission Brings Fresh Criticism
New Hampshire officials do not roll out welcome mat

From left, former Ohio Secretary of State Ken Blackwell, Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach and New Hampshire Secretary of State Bill Gardner at a meeting of the Presidential Advisory Commission on Election Integrity on Tuesday in Manchester, N.H. (Holly Ramer/AP)

A host of fresh criticism rained down on President Donald Trump’s commission on voter fraud Tuesday as it held its second meeting since the panel’s creation in May.

Most of the harshness was directed at Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach, a Republican who led the meeting of the Presidential Advisory Commission on Election Integrity in his capacity as vice chairman. Vice President Mike Pence, the panel’s chairman, was not present.

Thanks to Bannon, White House Can't Shake Comey Firing
Former FBI boss, Hillary Clinton's book distract from taxes, hurricane response

Then-FBI Director JAmes Comey testifying in from of a Senate panel in 2015. The Trump White House cannot shake questions about his firing. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Updated 6:23 p.m. | Former White House chief strategist Steve Bannon’s explosive comments about the firing of former FBI Director James B. Comey is pulling administration officials away from their intended messaging about two federal hurricane responses and a quest for bipartisan tax legislation.

White House officials set up a week featuring a series of high-level meetings, including several involving President Donald Trump and key lawmakers, meant to portray him and his senior team as aggressively working with members of both parties on issues such as revisions to the tax code, racial tensions, and other matters.

No Easy Answer for Vulnerable Dems When Trump Sends Invite
Heitkamp took Air Force One to N.D. event, but McCaskill skipped one in Missouri

President Donald Trump is pushing Sen. Heidi Heitkamp, D-N.D., to support a coming tax-overhaul package. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

One by one, President Donald Trump asked state and local officials to join him onstage during his Wednesday tax overhaul roadshow stop in North Dakota. And he saved perhaps the most important one, at least when it comes to getting the votes for such a rewrite of the tax code, for last, Democratic Sen. Heidi Heitkamp.

“You are all in favor of tax cuts,” Trump said to the group, as the North Dakota officials joined the audience in applause. “They work hard. They are with you 100 percent,” the president told the audience.

Trump Tweets Comey’s Early Clearing of Clinton Reveals ‘Rigged’ System
After report of tension with Kelly, president tweets chief of staff ‘doing a great job’

A school group from Illinois touring the Newseum in Washington pauses to watch Comey during his testimony about the Russia-Trump probe. On Friday, President Donald Trump said Comey's actions on Hillary Clinton show a “rigged” system. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Updated at 8:53 a.m. By writing a statement exonerating Hillary Clinton over her use of a private server while secretary of state before concluding his investigation, then-FBI Director James Comey revealed a system “rigged” in her favor, President Donald Trump said Friday.

Senate Judiciary Chairman Charles E. Grassley, R-Iowa and Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., chairman of Judiciary’s Crime and Terrorism subcommittee, revealed Comey’s actions Thursday. They cited transcripts they reviewed of interviews federal investigators conducted last fall with two FBI officials who were close to Comey: James Rybicki, Comey’s chief of staff, and Trisha Anderson, the principal deputy general counsel of National Security and Cyberlaw.

Stivers says Both Parties’ Rhetoric Inciting Hate
NRCC chairman said culture hasn’t changed after Congressional Baseball practice shooting

Rep. Steve Stivers, R-Ohio, said both parties are to blame for hateful rhetoric and increased violence (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The Ohio Republican said neither side took initiative to say enough was enough, despite the fact Majority Whip Steve Scalise was shot in the hip and faces a long road for recovery.

“We all need to look ourselves in the mirror and figure out how we might be contributing to the problems with our society,” he said.

Patrick Murphy Talkin’ ’Bout His Generation
Former congressman to begin Georgetown fellowship this fall

Former Florida Rep. Patrick Murphy, shown here in 2016, was 29 when he was first elected to the House in 2012. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

One of the first millennials elected to Congress will head to Georgetown University this fall to help students understand political issues unique to their generation. 

As a fellow with the Institute of Politics and Public Service at Georgetown’s McCourt School of Public Policy, Former Rep. Patrick Murphy, 34, will lead discussions on how government must adjust to accommodate the so-called “gig” economy, how political careers have changed in the age of social media, and how an anticipated flood of millennial voters could upend norms in Washington, among other issues. 

Ryan Doesn't See Trump Debt Ceiling Tweet As Personal Attack
Speaker acknowledges leadership did consider attaching debt ceiling to veterans bill

President Donald Trump Speaker Paul Ryan, R-Wis., have largely avoided public tension since the campaign until Trump targeted Ryan in a Thursday tweet about the debt ceiling. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Speaker Paul D. Ryan on Thursday found himself the target of one of President Donald Trump’s tweets for the first time since the campaign, but he said he didn’t regard it as an attack.

Trump tweeted that he asked Ryan and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell to tie a debt ceiling increase to a recently passed veterans bill, but they didn’t.