staffers

Student charged for wiretapping Rep. Andy Harris’ office for Facebook Live stream
Student and marijuana activist charged with two felony counts for recording meeting without permission

A Maryland college student has been charged for wiretapping for Facebook Live streaming a meeting with a staffer for Maryland Republican Rep. Andy Harris. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

A student and marijuana advocate from Salisbury University in Maryland has been charged for wiretapping Rep. Andy Harris’ office after he allegedly streamed a meeting on Facebook Live with one of Harris’ staffers without permission.

Jake Burdett, 20, was charged last week in state court and faces two felony counts for making and distributing a video of a Maryland Marijuana Justice rally at Harris’ district office in October, The Baltimore Sun reported.

Not OkCupid: Staffers urged to tell sweethearts to skip the Capitol Hill deliveries
Otherwise, Capitol Police will be peeking at notes from your sweetie ... and they will probably be late

Security procedures might squash Valentine’s Day treats for staffers. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

It’s a well-known fact of life on Capitol Hill: It’s nearly impossible to get packages delivered in a timely manner. That includes Valentine’s Day.

Senate staffers are being urged to tell their sweethearts to skip romantic gestures that include deliveries to congressional office buildings this week.

House offices on timeline to implement anti-harassment policies
The House took steps to further codify protections following last year’s dispute over how Congress should prevent harassment and discrimination

House offices have 60 days to implement an anti-harassment and anti-discrimination policy. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

The House took steps Thursday to further codify a more appropriate culture on Capitol Hill, following last year’s prolonged dispute over how Congress should protect its own staff from harassment and discrimination.

The House Administration Committee voted to approve regulations for mandatory anti-harassment and anti-discrimination policies for House offices. 

Democrats are tweaking Trump with their State of the Union guests
Federal contractors, mothers separated from their children at the border are on the list

Rep. Bonnie Watson Coleman, D-New Jersey, will be accompanied to the State of the Union by Victorina Morales, an undocumented immigrant who worked as a housekeeper at the Trump National Golf Club in Bedminster, New Jersey. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The floor belongs to Donald Trump for around an hour, maybe more, but the crowd can still speak volumes.

The lawmakers squeezed into the House chamber on Tuesday night probably won’t be yelling back as the president tells them that the state of the union is strong. (Joe Wilson, of “You lie” fame, already tried that with Barack Obama.)

Rayburn’s &pizza set for a grand opening Feb. 6
The fast-casual pizzeria’s Capitol location will be the 33rd shop for the chain, which calls itself a ‘homegrown D.C. craft pie purveyor’

A new &pizza will open Feb. 6 in the Rayburn House Office Building. (Courtesy &pizza)

A new &pizza is set to open on the Capitol campus Feb. 6, with a grand opening in the Rayburn House Office Building.

The Rayburn &pizza location will be the 33rd shop for the chain, which calls itself a “homegrown D.C. craft pie purveyor.”

Sen. Tim Scott picks ‘Movin’ On Up’ as his moving-day soundtrack
The South Carolina Republican has an almost brand-new office, plus a giant roll of bubble wrap

Sen. Tim Scott is moving into an office this week that just one other lawmaker has ever occupied. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Sen. Tim Scott is moving into an office this week that just one other lawmaker has ever occupied. That’s as close to brand-new as you can get in the Senate.

Former Sen. Orrin Hatch moved into Hart 104 when the building first opened in 1982 and vacated the space upon his retirement in December. After 36 years, the suite was packed with personal treasures, including his Book of Mormon, a rifle given to him by the NRA and a recent gift from Majority Leader Mitch McConnell.

Republicans want answers on ‘excessive show of force’ in Roger Stone arrest
GOP lawmakers also ask in letter to FBI Director Christopher Wray whether bureau tipped off media

Republican Sen. Lindsey Graham sent a letter to FBI Director Christopher Wray asking why the bureau executed an armed, pre-dawn raid to arrest Roger Stone. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call/POOL file photo)

Republican lawmakers demanded answers on Wednesday from FBI Director Christopher Wray on the arrest of former Donald Trump campaign adviser Roger Stone last week.

In separate letters to FBI Director Christopher Wray, House Judiciary ranking member Doug Collins and Senate Judiciary Chairman Lindsey Graham expressed concern that the FBI agents who made the arrest, armed with M4 rifles, used an “excessive show of force” to arrest an “elderly man” with no history of violent crimes and who had made known that he would voluntarily surrender.

House members are more diverse, but does the same go for staff?
Roughly 40 percent of new House members have hired a top staffer of color

Staffers for Rep. Deb Haaland, D-N.M., pose in her office. Haaland pledged during her campaign that she would hire a diverse group. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

More women and people of color are serving in the House than ever before. And at least one office has fueled hopes of that diversity extending to congressional staffers.

New Mexico Rep. Deb Haaland announced earlier this month that she had assembled a majority-minority team, fulfilling a campaign promise to hire a diverse staff.

This is what the Senate looks like through the eyes of a puppy
Power doesn’t scare Pippa, and the pupparazzi are taking note

Samantha Heyrich holds Pippa, a corgi puppy, in the Russell Building on Wednesday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

When they hear Pippa’s bells, staffers scurry out of their offices and into the hallway like kids hearing the song of an ice cream truck.

Pippa Heyrich is a tiny corgi puppy who’s been brightening spirits in the Senate in recent weeks, despite the government shutdown and the challenges of a divided legislature. The bells on her collar alert everyone that there’s a cute distraction coming their way.

Former lawmakers, staff quickly set up on K Street
But many are finding a competitive job market downtown

Former Sen. Jon Kyl, R-Ariz., has returned to his previous job at lobbying and law firm Covington. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The revolving door between Capitol Hill and K Street kicked into hyper-spin this week, just days into the new Congress, as recently departed lawmakers and aides announced new gigs.

In an unusually fast repeat move, former Sen. Jon Kyl, the Arizona Republican who rejoined the Senate last year to temporarily fill the late Sen. John McCain’s seat, returned to his previous job at the lobbying and law firm Covington. He reported earning $1.9 million from the firm during part of 2017 and 2018, according to a recently filed 2018 financial disclosure form, and he will be subject to a two-year ban on lobbying Congress, as are all senators in the first two years after leaving office.