From the CQ Newsroom

What day of the Trump trial is it? It turns out there’s no wrong answer
(But we say it started Wednesday)

Capitol workers wind the Ohio Clock in the Ohio Clock Corridor in the Capitol on Tuesday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

When did the Senate impeachment trial of President Donald Trump begin?

This publication says Wednesday, but depending on which news outlet you watch or read, Thursday could be the second, third or fourth day of the trial.

How Ed Henry covered impeachment the first time
Roll Call alum is starting a new role at Fox News just as impeachment articles hit the Senate. That brought back some memories

Heard on the Hill alum Ed Henry gets ready for a new role at Fox News. (Courtesy Fox News)

Ed Henry had an interview scheduled with Bill Clinton. It was a relatively sleepy week in Washington, the State of the Union was approaching, and the young reporter planned to ask the president about his relationship with Congress.

Things changed. News of the Monica Lewinsky scandal broke, and what was supposed to be a routine sit-down turned into a 15-minute phone call brimming with executive denials: “not sexual,” “not improper,” “not true.”

Relive impeachment week from behind the scenes on Capitol Hill

Rep. Greg Steube, R-Fla., does a TV news interview in Statuary Hall as the House takes up articles of impeachment against President Donald Trump on Wednesday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

The House voted to impeach President Donald Trump this week. 

The chamber's inquiry that was launched Sept. 24 came to a close Wednesday on a largely party-line vote in the House. CQ Roll Call has covered it from the start. 

Bipartisan thumbs-down to facial recognition technology
Surveillance sparks comparisons to Orwellian dystopia

A Customs and Border Protection officer scans a traveler entering the United States in February 2018 at Miami International Airport. The use of facial recognition technology by the government violates the First and Fourth amendments, some lawmakers believe. (Joe Raedle/Getty Images file photo)

In 2016, police officers in Baltimore used new technology to scan the faces of protesters who filled the city’s streets following the death in custody of Freddie Gray, a 25-year-old black man. Among those whose most recognizable features may have been documented was Rep. Elijah E. Cummings, the Democratic chairman of the House Oversight and Reform Committee.

Three years later, Cummings is still angry such surveillance was conducted without a warrant or reason to believe that he — or any other protester, for that matter — had done anything illegal. Now he’s putting the full weight of his committee’s jurisdiction behind a push to ban facial recognition technology until Congress can pass comprehensive legislation to govern its use.

Schumer wants to know how many journalists will be fired if hedge fund takes over USA TODAY
Senate minority leader has written to president of Alden Global Capital about bidding for Gannett

Senate Minority Leader Chharles E. Schumer is concerned about a hedge fund's attempt to take control of USA TODAY's parent company. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer wants to know how many journalists a hedge fund intends to lay off if it manages to take control of the publisher of USA TODAY.

The attempt by the hedge fund Alden Global Capital to take control of the newspaper publisher Gannett has the attention of the New York senator, who is expressing concern about the ability of the public to have access to local news.

Suspicious Package Cases Grow, Potential Explosive Devices Sent to Prominent Democrats
Secret Service identifies other packages as potential explosives

Suspicious packages containing potential explosive devices have been sent to prominent Democrats, including Debbie Wasserman Schultz and Barack Obama. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Updated 2:30 p.m. | Capitol Police are investigating a suspicious package at a House of Representatives mail processing facility in Maryland, following a string of suspected explosive devices sent to prominent Democrats. An explosive ordnance team was dispatched to the Capitol Heights, Maryland facility. 

Earlier Wednesday, suspicious packages were sent to the homes of the Clintons and Obamas and CNN’s headquarters. Democratic donor George Soros had a similar package sent to him this week. The packages sent to former President Barack Obama and the Clintons were intercepted by the Secret Service during routine mail screening procedures. The packages were identified to be potential explosive devices, according to a Secret Service statement.

Flags Lowered to Honor Murdered Annapolis Journalists
White House gives order after public pressure mounted following initial denial

The American flag over the White House was quickly lowered after President Trump ordered flags lowered to honor the Capital Gazette staffers shot dead last week. (John T. Bennett/CQ Roll Call)

Amid mounting social pressure, President Donald Trump ordered flags around the Capitol and the country were lowered Tuesday to honor the five journalists murdered last Thursday in a Maryland newsroom.

The GOP president had denied a request made last week by Annapolis Mayor Gavin Buckley, a Democrat, via the state’s lawmakers for Trump to order flags across the country to be lowered to honor the Capital Gazette staff members who were shot dead in their Annapolis office.

Analysis: Top Brow-Furrowing Moments From Trump’s Tax Bash
‘The economy is indeed doing well,’ president says before addressing newsroom murders

President Donald Trump on Friday asked invited guests if they were aware that the U.S. economy is the world’s largest. (Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

This might be remembered as the week President Donald Trump, back in campaign mode, got his sharp-tongued rhetorical groove back. And he kept it up Friday, even while making his first public remarks about a shooting at a Maryland newsroom that occurred roughly 30 miles from the White House and left five dead.

The president came to the White House’s East Room for a long-scheduled event on the six-month-anniversary of a GOP tax law he signed in late December with a prepared statement about the Annapolis shooting at the Capital Gazette office.

An Intense Reporter Turned Patient Editor: Steve Komarow Remembered
Few Capitol reporters and war correspondents make no enemies; CQ Roll Call’s top editor an exception

Steve Komarow, CQ Roll Call’s senior vice president and executive editor. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Steve Komarow, CQ Roll Call’s executive editor and senior vice president, accomplished something very rare in the often cutthroat worlds of Washington bureaus and foreign correspondence: Across a varied and accomplished career of four decades, his calmly confident news judgment and patiently clear-eyed managerial style produced nearly universal respect and virtually no lasting enmity.

At the Capitol and across several war zones, Komarow, who died Sunday at 61, stood out for his unruffled approach to the most dramatic developments, an equanimity in supervising high-maintenance reporters, an easy affect amid intense journalistic competition — and a cockeyed grin when confronted with the constant but mostly ephemeral melodramas of all four high-pressure newsrooms where he played pivotal roles.