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Whip List: Obamacare Rollback Vote Nears Breaking Point
A handful of more GOP opponents would doom measure

House Appropriations Chairman Rodney Frelinghuysen, left, said he is opposed to the current bill. Majority Whip Steve Scalise and Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy will need to whip more votes. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Enough Republicans appeared on the verge of breaching the dam of support for the House health care overhaul to require frantic lobbying as floor debate got underway Friday.

At least 17 House Republicans had already signaled opposition since the end of a Thursday evening huddle with top Trump administration officials in which Office of Management and Budget Director Mick Mulvaney delivered an ultimatum, saying President Donald Trump was done negotiating on repealing and replacing the 2010 health care law.

Jimmy Panetta Takes a Hard Line on Military Spending
Son of Defense secretary represents Monterey County

Rep. Jimmy Panetta, left, was sworn in to Congress alongside his father, former Defense Secretary Leon Panetta, also a former member of the House. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

When the House approved the $577.9 billion fiscal 2017 defense spending bill on March 8, only 48 members — including four freshmen — voted against it. It’s politically difficult to vote against a measure that pays for the weapons U.S. forces need and supplies the funds for a 2.1 percent pay increase for Americans in uniform.

One of the freshmen was Jimmy Panetta, the youngest of former Defense Secretary Leon Panetta’s three children. He explained that he opposed the bill because it did not spend enough. “It could have done more to help my area on the central coast of California,” Panetta says.

Rep. LoBiondo: Stop Calling My Office Over Health Care Bill
N.J. Republican says his mind is made up, constituents can’t get through for services

Rep. Frank LoBiondo, R-N.J., is asking people to stop calling his office hourly about health care legislation. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Rep. Frank LoBiondo is asking people to stop calling his office hourly to convince him to vote for the Republican plan to replace the 2010 health care law.

Lawmakers have reported huge increases of calls to their offices — many from outside their districts — both in D.C. and in their districts over the health carebill. And number of Republican members have seen protests in front of their district offices.

Announcing Keystone, Trump Declares ‘New Era of American Energy Policy’
Brash POTUS tells TransCanada boss his lobbyists did not do ‘a damn thing’ to get his OK

Pipes like these will be used to build the Keystone Pipeline in the United States, which President Trump formally approved on Friday. (Photo via WikiCommons)

President Donald Trump announced Friday he has formally approved a Canadian firm’s application to construct the Keystone Pipeline, a project long block by his predecessor and demanded by GOP lawmakers.

“It’s a great day for American jobs, a historic day for North America and energy independence,” Trump said at his desk in the Oval Office. “This announcement is part of a new era of American energy policy that will lower costs for American families, and very significantly reduce our dependence on foreign oil.”

House GOP Passes Closed Rule for Health Care Bill

UNITED STATES — MARCH 23: Speaker of the House Paul Ryan, R-Wisc., returns to his office from the House floor in the Capitol on Thursday, March 23, 2017. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Continuing a weeks-long process of decisions regarding legislation to partially repeal the 2010 health care law that fly in the face of their repeated calls for “regular order,” House Republicans passed a same-day, closed rule to govern debate on the legislation. 

The 230-194 passage of the rule vote in no way indicates that the legislation itself will pass when the House votes on the bill later Friday. It simply means that opponents of the bill aren’t frustrated enough with the process to vote down the rule.

The Latest on Republican Health Care Bill Vote
Vote-counting goes down to the wire as Friday afternoon vote expected

Rep. Rod Blum, R-Iowa,a member of the House Freedom Caucus, is interviewed after a meeting at the White House Thursday over the Republican health care bill. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

All eyes are on the House of Representatives on Friday as Republican leaders try to push through their plan to partially repeal and replace the 2010 health care law, the first major test of one of Donald Trump's biggest campaign promises.

After scuttling plans for a vote Thursday — the seventh anniversary of the passage of 2010 Affordable Care Act — House leaders negotiated deep into the night and emerged with a promise of a Friday vote. It’s unclear whether enough conservative hardliners and moderates who have so far stood in opposition to the bill will come around in time.

Former Rep. Owens Recalls Pressure Over Obamacare Vote
Obama tried making the final sell, left strong-arming to others

Former Rep. Bill Owens, D-N.Y., recalled the pressure he faced on his 2010 health care vote. (Bill Clark/Roll Call file photo)

Trump Cites Planned Parenthood to Exert Late Pressure on Conservatives
In need of perhaps 40 votes, president turns to his Twitter bully pulpit

President Donald Trump invoked one of the scourges of conservatives — Planned Parenthood — to try to sway holdouts to vote for the Republican health care bill. (Alex Wong/Getty Images)

President Donald Trump, hours from perhaps his first legislative defeat, used his favorite bully pulpit — Twitter — to pressure a conservative House group into supporting a GOP-crafted health overhaul bill.

Trump huddled at the White House on Thursday with more than 30 members of the House Freedom Caucus, trying to convince them to back the American Health Care Act. He failed to win over the entire group — and later moderates in the Tuesday Group — and eventually dispatched top aides to the Capitol with a message: It’s time to vote.

Trump Loss on Health Care Could Roil Markets
Investors dialing back expectations president’s agenda will be enacted swiftly

Investors are worried a failure on health care repeal and replace for President Donald Trump could weaken markets. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

A potential failure to pass the proposed Republican replacement to the 2010 health care law could result in investors wanting to sell, analysts say.

Before the vote on the bill was postponed, investors were reducing hopes President Donald Trump could swiftly enact the rest of his agenda, Reuters reported.

House GOP Heads Into Health Care Vote ‘Between a Rock and a Hard Place’
Regardless of outcome, Republicans will walk away with losses

House Majority Whip Steve Scalise, R-La., has been trying to woo undecided Republicans to support the health care bill as a do-or-die vote approaches on Friday. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

The outcome of Friday’s House vote to partially repeal and replace the 2010 health care law is not certain, but one thing is: All parties to the Republican negotiations will walk away with some losses.

After a marathon few weeks of debate over the health care measure, President Donald Trump decided he was done dealing and urged the House to vote on the measure and let the chips fall where they may.