March 28, 2015 SIGN IN | REGISTER

Opinion Archive

LNG Exports Can Power America?s Economic Recovery | Commentary

During the darkest days of the Great Recession, one of the lone bright spots was America’s energy industry. Increased oil and natural gas production powered the manufacturing renaissance that pulled our economy back from the brink.

Rand Paul, Hillary Clinton Face Foreign Policy Challenges in 2016

While the economy is a decisive topic in many presidential elections, national security looks increasingly likely to become a top issue in next year’s contest. And if that happens, it could dramatically affect both the direction of the race for the Republican nomination and the party’s prospects in November.

Working Together: The Only Approach to Prescription Abuse | Commentary

Prescription drug abuse is a pervasive public health problem that transcends age and ZIP code. No one sets out to be an addict and every person has a unique story — a grandmother with chronic pain who slowly and unwittingly becomes dependent on her medication, the teenager who steals from a parent’s medicine cabinet and misuses or even sells their medicines, or the war veteran who simply seeks to overcome incomprehensible pain that never stops.

Congress Can't Dodge Social Security Disability Insurance Trust Fund's Approaching Insolvency | Commentary

As if stirring, like Rip Van Winkle, from a 20-year snooze, Congress is finally awakened to the teetering finances of the Social Security’s disability program. Better late than never, but policymakers have known for years that this day would arrive — and it has.

Past and Precedent: What Makes This Mississippi Special Election Interesting

You might think the best way to understand Mississippi’s upcoming 1st District special election to fill the late Rep. Alan Nunnelee’s seat is to examine the 2008 special election in the same district. After all, that previous special election to fill the seat left open by Roger Wicker’s appointment to the Senate happened less than seven years ago.

Valentine's Is Not so Sweet for Florists | Commentary

Florists count on Valentine’s Day revenues much like other retailers count on Christmas — a good holiday can make or break a shop’s financial year. To capitalize on an expected increase in business every February, many florists will rent vans or moving trucks to supplement their fleets, move extra stock and make deliveries. Unfortunately, when they do so, florists are forced to pay discriminatory taxes on the trucks they rent.

Protecting Medical Identity Is a Must-Win Battle in the War for Cybersecurity | Commentary

The cyberattack carried out recently against Anthem, one of the nation’s leading health insurers, is yet another stark reminder of the persistent threats American businesses and consumers face in the digital age.

Consent of the Governed: A Principled Path to a Free and Open Internet | Commentary

Early last year, the White House announced its plans to go forward with ending any United States government oversight over Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers and the World Wide Web.

Trade Policy Is Low-Hanging Fruit for a Bipartisan Win | Commentary

The president’s State of the Union address laid out the White House’s priorities for the coming year and gave policy wonks an indication of what is likely to happen, or not, in the year ahead. While several items in President Barack Obama’s remarks, including tax and energy policy initiatives, are unlikely to move ahead in the Republican-controlled Congress, there was one bright spot which may elicit bipartisan cooperation: trade policy.

A Message to Congress, Regulators: Installment Loans Work | Commentary

Traditional installment loans are the safest and most affordable way for American families to borrow small dollar amounts.

Congress Should Correct Distortions in the Coal Market and Invest in Struggling Coal Communities | Commentary

Many of the hardest-working communities in America are in the Appalachian coal region that stretches from Ohio and Pennsylvania, to Kentucky, West Virginia and Virginia. For decades, workers have given all of their daylight hours in the darkness of mines so their families and others across the country can keep their lights on. But for decades these communities have suffered economic decline, as widespread job losses have decimated cities and towns and left families with little support. Generations of coal miners have seen their jobs disappear, from 122,000 in 1985 to just 58,000 in 2012, a reality driven largely by market forces and inequities embedded in the coal market.

Congress Needs to Follow the People on Clean Energy | Commentary

Harvesting power from the wind is about investing in long-term energy solutions that can benefit our families, communities and economy for generations to come.

You Shouldn't Have to Be Lucky to Get Paid Sick Days | Commentary

Everyone gets sick, from the common cold to a more serious illness. Recently, my 15-year-old daughter called me after school to tell me she had a bad headache and sore throat. Because my employer provides paid sick days, I was able to leave in the middle of the afternoon and take my daughter for a strep and flu test — no questions asked and no pay docked. Every parent should be able to be there for his or her sick child and have the same level of trust and economic stability that I do.

Congress: Fight for Medicare Home-Health Reforms

The entry of a new Congress last month signals a renewed opportunity for strengthening America’s Medicare program to ensure we are prepared to meet the health needs of an increasingly larger patient population with increasingly complicated and chronic care needs.

Is Ben Carson Really a Viable Presidential Candidate?

Just because something has not happened before doesn’t mean it can’t happen in the future.

Patent Trolls Come in All Shapes and Sizes | Commentary

Mythological trolls — described as old and ugly creatures living under bridges or in caves — are known for one central feature: generally troublesome and injurious to human enterprise. Much of the same can be said for today’s patent troll — the dubious business entity again drawing the ire of Congress that exists solely to acquire patents and make claims of infringement in court.

The President Should Thank Congress for Sanctions Bill | Commentary

President Barack Obama’s argument against the Iran sanctions bill is that it will collapse negotiations, making war increasingly likely as the only available option to stop a nuclear-armed Iran. On the contrary, the bill should be endorsed as the best chance to avoid war.

The Government Can Save Lives, Right Now | Commentary

Right now, British and American scientists have developed techniques to prevent life threatening and incurable diseases that affect tens of thousands of people around the world. And this week, the Parliament of the United Kingdom voted to pass regulations that will bring clinics one step closer to performing this technique, mitochondrial replacement therapy. Yet, for the more than 12,000 women with mitochondrial diseases in the United States at risk of having children with mitochondrial diseases, they face a ban on this lifeline to have healthy children. This issue, so critical to public health, is being half ignored, half slighted by Congress, the president and the relevant agencies. This is Washington gridlock at its worst, and it has to stop.

TSCA Reform Should Embrace the Best Application of Toxicological Science -- a Perspective From its Practitioners | Commentary

The federal law governing chemicals used in commerce in the United States affects every person and business, but few are aware of its importance to their lives or that it is outdated and in serious need of modernization.

The Elementary and Secondary Education Act: Reauthorize an Early Start and a Great Finish | Commentary

As Congress debates the reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act —commonly known as No Child Left Behind—it’s a great time to consider better policies for all children. No Child Left Behind wasted a great deal of effort and money and produced too few benefits because it addressed problems in our educational system too late in the lives of children and removed incentives for schools to develop the full range of intellectual, emotional and social skills necessary for individuals to flourish in the 21st century economy. ESEA should be revised to start with quality early learning and continue with K-12 education that develops the whole child.

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