Politics

Senate Intelligence Probe of Trump and Russia Grinds Forward
No one ever said it would be fast, but Democrats are frustrated about pace

Sens. Mark Warner and Richard M. Burr are slowly plodding ahead. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Democrats may be frustrated about the pace of the Senate Intelligence Committee’s probe of Russian meddling in the 2016 election, but recent reports of trouble could be overblown.

A congressional source familiar with the committee’s work noted in particular the reported concerns about the Intelligence panel not having a full time staff for the investigation. The individuals detailed to work on the probe are spending roughly 95 percent of their time working on Russia’s activities in the United States, the source said.

Ossoff Campaign Steps Up Field Efforts for June Runoff
The Democrat’s campaign spent $2 million in field for primary

Volunteers for Jon Ossoff arrive at a campaign office to canvass the district the day before the April 18 primary. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Ahead of the June runoff in Georgia's 6th District, Jon Ossoff’s big-spending campaign is ramping up its “field-first” strategy for the next two months.  

Ossoff’s team spent nearly $2 million on its field efforts for last week's primary, including paying for a Lyft code in the district so that voters without a ride could get to the polls on Election Day.

Polis Mulling Gubernatorial Run in Colorado
The 2nd District congressman says he'll decide in 'next month or two'

Rep. Jared Polis, D-Colo., said he is considering a run for governor. (Al Drago/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Democratic Colorado Rep. Jared Polis said he is considering a run for governor, in an interview with Coloradopolitics.com 

“I’m going to be deciding in the next month or two whether or not to launch a statewide race for governor,” Polis said in an interview with the site that ran Monday morning. 

Top Dems Blast Trump’s First 100 Days, Border Wall Demands
Schumer: Best if president 'stepped out' of government shutdown-avoidance talks

Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer, D-N.Y., and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif. — pictured here in March — on Monday had critical words for President Donald Trump. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Updated at 11:35 a.m. Democratic leaders slammed President Donald Trump on Monday for a “parade of broken promises to working people” during his first 100 days, and said his demands for border wall funding in a must-pass spending bill have stalled talks to avert a government shutdown.

Congressional Democrats are planning a week-long barrage to counter a White House public relations campaign to paint Trump’s first three-plus months as successful. They offered a preview of their messages on a conference call with reporters, with Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer of New York dubbing many of Trump’s campaign promises “broken” or “unfulfilled.”

Two Freedom Caucus Members Feeling Strong After Trump's Threat Last Month
Sanford and Labrador still comfortable with their votes against health care bill

Rep. Mark Sanford, R-S.C., said President Donald Trump threatened a primary challenge against him. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

South Carolina Republican Rep. Mark Sanford talked with CNN on Sunday about the threat he says President Donald Trump’s team made on his seat during the health care debate last month — a primary challenge against him.

“It all, I guess, fits in love, war and politics but I don’t think it’s particularly productive to his own legislative agenda and we’ll see what develops,” he said.

Syria, Trump and Congress’ Ever-Eroding War Powers
Lawmakers lukewarm to a force-authorization measure for U.S. missile strike

President Donald Trump and his national security team receive a briefing on April 6 about an air strike he ordered on a Syrian air base. (White House photo)

President Donald Trump has gone to great lengths to break from the policies and approaches of his predecessor. Yet, when it came to justifying a round of U.S. military missile strikes in Syria, the new commander in chief dusted off a legal rationale crafted by Barack Obama’s administration.

Like the 44th president, Trump contended that the Constitution vests in the office of the presidency enough war powers to carry out some isolated military operations without lawmakers’ approval.

Analysis: 5 Ways Republicans Can Finish Health Care Overhaul
No path is a slam dunk, some options have a better chance than others

House Speaker Paul D. Ryan conducts a news conference with members of the GOP caucus on Capitol Hill on April 6 to announce a new amendment to the health care bill to repeal and replace the 2010 law. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Republicans have promised their effort to repeal and replace the 2010 health care law is alive and kicking. And they’re likely to keep going at it until they pass a bill or get elected out office. 

There are at least five different legislative paths for getting a health care overhaul passed before next year’s midterm elections — some more viable than others and none guaranteed to work without support from a majority of Republicans.

White House Plans Week of Activities as Trump’s 100th Day Approaches
President still lacks a big legislative victory amid record low approval ratings

President Donald Trump prepares to sign an executive order last week in Wisconsin aimed at bringing jobs back to American. His 100th day in office is fast approaching without a legislative win. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)

Updated at 8:41 a.m. | The White House has prepared an action-packed week for President Donald Trump ahead of his 100th day in office, including the unveiling of the “principles” behind his tax overhaul plan and more executive orders.

Trump and his senior staff are gearing up to make the case it will be the most productive 100 days for any president in 84 years. Democrats, meanwhile, will be pushing their position — that the 45th president has spent his first few months in office breaking his campaign promises.

Shutdown Under GOP Control Could Be Historic
Federal funding gaps rare under unified government

Not since President Jimmy Carter’s administration have funding gaps occurred when Congress and the executive branch were unified under one party. (CQ Roll Call File Photo)

If the Republican majorities in the House and Senate are unable to get legislation to President Donald Trump’s desk to keep the government running beyond an April 28 deadline, it could be a fairly historic political moment.

Not since President Jimmy Carter’s administration have a Congress and an executive branch unified under one party seen government funding gaps occur, according to the Congressional Research Service.

GOP Lawmakers Pushing for Nuclear Waste Facility in Nevada
Yucca Mountain repository project halted by Obama administration.

A “no trespassing” sign warns people to stay away from a proposed nuclear waste dump site at  Yucca Mountain in Nevada. (David McNew/Getty Images file photo)

Republicans on the House Energy and Commerce Committee have released a discussion draft for a bill that would create incentives to put the shuttered Yucca Mountain repository on track to become the nation’s main nuclear waste disposal site.

The draft text to amend the Nuclear Waste Policy Act is the first of many steps lawmakers must take to bring the project online again after the Trump administration expressed a willingness to re-engage on the issue following the project’s halt by the Obama administration in 2010.

Photos From the Science March, on Earth Day
Protesters came to D.C. on Saturday in support of science

Marchers — including Bill Nye the Science Guy, at center — lead the March for Science down Constitution Avenue in Washington on Earth Day, Saturday, April 22. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Thousands of pro-science and environmental activists rallied on the National Mall before marching toward the Capitol on Saturday, the 47th observation of Earth Day. The march in Washington was accompanied by other science marches across the U.S. and world. It was organized to show support for the scientific community at a time when its members, and supporters, say they feel threatened by the policies and potential policies of President Donald Trump.

Trump Administration Plans to Roll Out Tax Plan Next Week
Unveiling would join government shutdown threat and health care re-try on week’s docket

President Donald Trump delivers his address to a joint session of Congress on Feb. 28. He plans to roll out his long-promised tax reform plan next week. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

By JOHN T. BENNETT and LINDSEY McPHERSON, CQ Roll Call

A government shutdown deadline, maybe a second try at pushing a health care overhaul bill through the House, an image-focused president approaching his 100th day. And, now, a White House tax reform plan.

7 Major Battles Ahead on the Environment
The environmental state of play on Trump's first Earth Day
Coffman Gets Second Democratic Challenger
Aurora attorney said incumbent’s support of health care repeal motivated him

Rep. Mike Coffman, R-Colo., received a second Democratic challenger. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Nancy Pelosi Misses George W. Bush
House minority leader says she’d work with Republicans on health care if repeal is off the table

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., said she and President George W. Bush did work work together despite disagreements (file photo CQ Roll Call).