April 18, 2014 SIGN IN | REGISTER

Things to Do Archive

Ballets Russes Comes to National Gallery in Multimedia Form

A century ago this month, an avant-garde ballet troop scandalized Paris with a primeval portrayal of human sacrifice set to dissonant music that seemed designed to provoke audiences and repudiate entrenched artistic conventions.

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Nonpolitical D.C.: 13 Movies to Check Out

Politics is such a part of the lifeblood of Washington, D.C., that sometimes people forget there is a city beyond the Capitol Dome and White House.

'Coriolanus' Provides a Modern Political Morality Tale

A staccato drum beat. A stone, gray set. The nobles stand a body-length above the people. The people are hungry and shouting for corn. The nobility looks on in disdain.

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Mumbo Sauce Show Highlights District Subculture

Mumbo Sauce. It’s not just a condiment anymore. It’s an art show.

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Take a Bang-Up White House Tour, Courtesy of Hollywood

“You can always fail up in politics — and in Hollywood,” said Aaron Eckhart, who has played his share of political figures in movies, including a lobbyist, a district attorney and now, president of the United States in Antoine Fuqua’s latest film, “Olympus Has Fallen.”

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National Gallery of Art Assembles Durer Works

It would be practically impossible to assemble a museum exhibit containing all of the essential works of a Renaissance master such as Michelangelo or da Vinci. But after a decade of planning, the National Gallery of Art is taking a stab at another giant of the era — German painter and printmaker Albrecht Durer.

Cyrus Cylinder Makes First Appearance in D.C.

At a time when Iran’s identity in the West is being defined by portrayals of revolution in the movie “Argo” and by the nation’s nuclear program, an exhibit opening this week at the Arthur M. Sackler Gallery recalls a time when the ancient kingdom of Persia was a test bed for tolerance and human rights.

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Spring Weekend Guide: Don't Let the Sequester Put a Damper on the Season

Spring is just around the corner, though the customary season of rebirth and rejuvenation is marred a bit this year by the sequester, a battle over continued funding of the government and a generally cloudy economic outlook.

'A Place at the Table' Aims for a Place in the Public's Eye

“I don’t think any member of Congress wants to be labeled ‘pro-hunger,’” said Chef Tom Colicchio, the founder of Craft Restaurants and lead judge on Bravo TV’s mega-hit “Top Chef.” “I think that’s something they’ll try to duck. I think that’s where this needs to head.”

Sláinte, Ireland!

They say there is a first time for everything and whether the nation realizes it, it’s experiencing a series of firsts in Washington, D.C.

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Schiff's New Role Connects Him to the District

Richard Schiff looks happy. At least, for him.

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A Love Story: 'Metamorphoses' Makes Valentine's Debut

Just in time for Valentine’s Day, Mary Zimmerman’s “Metamorphoses,” a lush, sensual adaptation of classic myths by Ovid, opens Thursday night at Arena Stage.

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'Our Town' Settles In Snugly to Modern D.C.

Few, if any, American plays have been read and performed in more high school auditoriums and college theaters than “Our Town.” Many productions through the years have treated the fictional Grover’s Corners a bit too literally, making the play more idyllic than its reality.

Hollywood's American Dream Factory

The American dream. Politicians have been talking about it a lot this week as they unveiled their plans to overhaul the nation’s immigration system.

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The Yoga of Rules: Mysore Yoga Expands in D.C.

Walk into a Mysore class and you may have no idea where to start.

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Ginning Up Good Cheers

The next time you raise a tangy, refreshing gin Rickey to your lips, be sure to toast Michael Lowe and John Uselton for bringing the most D.C. of beverages full circle.

Emancipation Proclamation Going Back on Display

The Civil War exhibit that opened last month at the Library of Congress will gain a special addition on Jan. 3, when curators for the first time in almost four years will display President Abraham Lincoln’s handwritten first draft of the Emancipation Proclamation.

Eat, Drink and Be Merry

No one knows quite what to expect on Dec. 21, when a 5,125-year cycle of the Mayan calendar draws to a close. But as the supposed apocalyptic deadline draws near, the question looms: How would you spend your final night on Earth?

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The Warmth of Other Sons

“Pullman Porter Blues” may not be destined to make musical theater history, but it does celebrate America’s history through a good, solid night of drama and the unerring power of the blues.

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Motor City Appeals to Lawmakers Via the Screen

“Burn,” a harrowing documentary about Detroit firefighters, opens Friday in Washington, D.C., the latest nonfiction film to bring the Motor City’s woes to the screens of national policymakers.

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