Politics

Women’s March on Washington in Photos

Citizens flock to nation’s capital to voice everything from outrage to empathy

(George LeVines/CQ Roll Call)

Under an ominous sky that never made good on its threat, turnout estimates for the Women’s March on Washington more than doubled expectations. Organizers of the protest — held to object to the inauguration of President Donald Trump — could no longer organize, but maybe they didn’t need to. Of the hundreds of thousands that descended on Washington, D.C., law enforcement reported no arrests. The crowd on Jan. 21 seemed to organize itself. The newly minted Trump addressed the intelligence community to mixed reviews that same day, but knit pink “pussy hats” around the globe dominated the news.

[Democratic Lawmakers Feel Boost from Women’s March]

As the march’s official 1 p.m. start time drew near, a sea of people continued to grow outward from the rendezvous point at Independence Avenue and Third Street SW. Down Independence the crowd swelled west, all the way to 14th Street. Volunteers tried to clear the planned march route, but the masses overwhelmed. They spread to Pennsylvania Avenue and looped down Constitution Avenue, around the Lincoln Memorial and back down Independence, filling the north-south streets that crosscut the National Mall.

Nobody knows the exact moment it happened, but at some point the Women’s March on Washington turned into more.

Here's a look at the day in photos:

(George LeVines/CQ Roll Call)
(George LeVines/CQ Roll Call)
(George LeVines/CQ Roll Call)
(George LeVines/CQ Roll Call)
(George LeVines/CQ Roll Call)
(George LeVines/CQ Roll Call)
(George LeVines/CQ Roll Call)
(George LeVines/CQ Roll Call)
(George LeVines/CQ Roll Call)
(George LeVines/CQ Roll Call)
(George LeVines/CQ Roll Call)
(George LeVines/CQ Roll Call)
(George LeVines/CQ Roll Call)
(George LeVines/CQ Roll Call)
(George LeVines/CQ Roll Call)
(George LeVines/CQ Roll Call)

Get breaking news alerts and more from Roll Call on your iPhone or your Android.