Politics

On Race Relations, Obama Sees 'Grind' Toward Any Progress

President predicts more 'problems' between police, black communities

President Obama late Tuesday, for the second consecutive day, delivered downtrodden remarks on race relations. (Photo by Getty Images)

President Barack Obama said police and black community representatives found no solutions Wednesday to ease tensions after a spate of shootings, saying the country should prepare to "grind" toward change amid increased unrest.  

"Not only are there very real problems but there are still deep divisions about how to solve these problems," Obama said following a summit on race relations and policing with members from both camps.   

[ Can U.S. Heal After Shootings? 'I Don't Know,' Obama Says ] "There is no doubt that police departments still feel embattled and unjustly accused. And there is no doubt that minority communities, communities of color, still feel like it just takes too long to do what's right."  

The White House session came one day after Obama spoke at a Dallas memorial service for five officers killed Thursday night by a black Army veteran who wanted to kill white cops following a Black Lives Matter protest of white officers shooting dead black men in Minnesota and Louisiana.  

[ Let's Not Call Dallas Shootings 'Terrorism' ]  "The pace of change is going to feel too fast for some and too slow for others," Obama said Wednesday evening, after the meeting ran hours longer than anticipated.  

 "And sadly, because this is a huge country that is very diverse, and we have a lot of police departments, I think it is fair to say that we will see more tension between police and communities this month, next month, next year, for quite some time," the president said.  

"We have to as a country sit down and just grind it out. Solve these problems," he added.  

The Untied States is again grappling with racial tensions as predominantly white police departments feel unjustly criticized, and African-American communities and activities see evidence of bias and mistreatment.   

For the second consecutive day, Obama delivered a dismal assessment about the state of race relations and tensions between mostly white police departments and black communities.  

[ Congressional Black Caucus Chair: Dallas Shooter 'Terrorist by Any Definition' ] "Can we find the character as America to open our hearts to each other? Can we see in each other a common humanity and a common dignity and see how our experiences have shaped us?” Obama asked a day before during a memorial service for Dallas cops killed by an African-American Army veteran . “I don’t know.”  

That mass killing came after a Black Lives Matter Protest in the city's downtown district. That peaceful protest was held in reaction to the shootings in Louisiana and Minnesota . The Louisiana killing was caught on video and shared widely on social media.  

Contact Bennett at johnbennett@cqrollcall.com. Follow him on Twitter @BennettJohnT.

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