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Kim Dine Will Stay On as Capitol Police Chief

The Capitol Police Board signaled it will continue to work with Chief Kim C. Dine, despite his resignation. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

It appears Capitol Police Chief Kim C. Dine is staying in place as the head of the department, with a new No. 2 to help iron out some of the discord within the ranks. The Capitol Police Board, in a Monday evening message to the congressional community, said it will continue to work with Dine and incoming Assistant Chief Matt Verderosa "to improve our service to the Capitol Community and to provide the officers with the necessary support they need to maintain the safety, openness and security of the Capitol." The message, obtained by CQ Roll Call, signals continuity in Capitol Police leadership after an April 10 report that Dine had submitted a resignation letter, and the news — four days later — that  Assistant Chief Daniel B. Malloy  would retire at the end of the month. It marks the first public comment from Senate Sergeant-at-Arms Frank J. Larkin and House Sergeant-at-Arms Paul D. Irving since the chief stated his intent to leave the department.  

In the wake of high-profile security incidents  that have provoked concern from lawmakers , the message also reiterated support for the 1,775 sworn officers protecting the Capitol:

"The Capitol Police Board is appreciative of the men and women of the United States Capitol Police (USCP) who are on the front lines protecting the Capitol each and every day and for those officers who most recently responded to the two recent incidents on the West Front – the tragic suicide on Saturday, April 11 and the arrest of Doug Hughes on Wednesday, April 15. In both instances, the police responded quickly and bravely to these unexpected events. We are fortunate to have such dedicated law enforcement professionals protecting the Capitol, Members, staff and visitors each and every day.

The Capitol Police Board will continue to work with Chief Dine and Assistant Chief Verderosa to improve our service to the Capitol Community and to provide the officers with the necessary support they need to maintain the safety, openness and security of the Capitol.

We also take this opportunity to remind all of those who work on Capitol Hill to continue to remain vigilant. If you notice any suspicious activity on Capitol grounds or elsewhere, immediately report it to the Capitol Police, Sergeant at Arms, or the appropriate authorities where you may be.

Thank you from the Board to our Capitol Police Officers and to the Congressional community for your continued support."

Law enforcement leaders stayed silent on previously acknowledged concerns about department leadership Monday night. Larkin, who serves as chairman of the police board, declined to comment on the situation.

Verderosa assumes his position as assistant chief of police and chief of operations effective May 1, marking a high point of his nearly 30 years in federal law enforcement. According to an internal department memo, obtained by CQ Roll Call, Verderosa began his career in 1985 with Supreme Court police, quickly departing the small agency for Capitol Police. He worked as a beat cop in the uniformed and patrol divisions, and detective within the department's Protective Services Bureau, before being promoted to sergeant in 1992.

In 1998, after four years conducting criminal and administrative investigations in the Internal Affairs Division, Verderosa was promoted to lieutenant in the Capitol Division. He drafted and implemented several major security plans, including for the impeachment trial of President Bill Clinton. Over the next decade, he ascended the ranks to become a deputy chief, overseeing the Training Services Bureau.  

Serving in a series of high-level administrative roles, Verderosa has overseen the offices of Human Resources and Administration, and represented Capitol Police to congressional oversight entities. He holds a bachelor's degree from the University of Delaware and a master's degree in management from the Johns Hopkins University. Since July 2013, Verderosa has commanded the department's Disciplinary Review Task Force on behalf of the Capitol Police's Executive Team.  

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