Facing Immigration Revolt, Republicans Plan Vote to Ban 'Administrative Amnesty' (Updated)

Cruz, who has proposed legislation prohibiting Obama from expanding deportation relief for illegal immigrants, met with House conservatives late Wednesday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Updated 11:07 p.m. | In a bid to shore up votes for their border supplemental, Republican leaders plan to give conservatives a vote Thursday prohibiting President Barack Obama from granting deportation relief to more illegal immigrants.  

One vote will be on the $659 million appropriations bill aimed at curbing the flow of child migrants at the U.S.-Mexico border, which includes policy riders that have alienated nearly all Democrats.  

On the condition of that bill passing, members would then be allowed to a vote on standalone language prohibiting the expansion of Obama's Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program granting deportation relief and work permits to children brought here illegally by their parents. Republicans charge that DACA has acted as a magnet for unaccompanied children to come to the United States, although recent immigrants are not eligible.  

Obama has promised to do all he can on his own on immigration by the end of the summer — and recent news reports that he may expand DACA's deportation relief to as many as 5 million additional illegal immigrants have roiled the GOP.  

Language targeting DACA would be similar to legislation pushed in the Senate by Texas Republican Ted Cruz, who, as negotiations were ongoing, was hosting conservative House members in his Capitol Hill office to discuss strategy on the matter. Cruz's bill has a companion in the House, sponsored by Rep. Marsha Blackburn, R-Tenn. The legislation would prohibit the administration from granting deportation and other relief to any more illegal immigrants. It does not target people who have already enrolled in DACA.  

The Rules Committee finalized the plan late Wednesday on a party line vote.  

Ranking member Louise M. Slaughter, D-N.Y., offered an amendment to strike the language that would bar Obama from continuing or expanding DACA. It was defeated along party lines, 3-8.  

Rules Democrat Jim McGovern of Massachusetts took issue with the timing of the proposal's introduction, which coincided with Cruz's dinner.  

"Mr. Cruz has considerably more sway than some of the leaders in the House," he quipped.  

Rules Chairman Pete Sessions, R-Texas, took issue with the criticism, saying there has been "a continuing dialogue within our conference about what would and would not be in [the bill], and yesterday we became aware of what was in, and that created a set of circumstances where there were certain discussions."  

The plan would force conservatives — many of whom have a history of voting for amendments and then voting against the underlying bill — to back the supplemental first if they want a chance to constrain what some conservatives, like Sen. Jeff Sessions, R-Alabama, have blasted as "administrative amnesty."  

The plan also came after Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., roiled conservatives by suggesting the House's bill could be used to conference a comprehensive immigration bill. That prompted Speaker John A. Boehner, R-Ohio, to blast Reid and vow no "immigration reform" of any kind would be added to the bill. It's not clear what will happen if the House border makes it to the Senate. Although the rule doesn't combine the border bill with the DACA language — as leadership at one point considered — the White House earlier Wednesday threatened a veto of the border bill on its own.  

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