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Vitter Amendment Rears Its Head in Wee Hours of Vote-a-Rama (Updated)

Vitter knows he has better leverage on must-pass legislation. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Updated 3:47 a.m. | Sen. David Vitter won a small victory in the wee hours Friday, resurrecting his amendment to end employer-provided health benefits for members of Congress.  

Fourteen hours into the vote-a-rama, 52 senators voted to approve the Louisiana Republican's proposal. It came first in a series of seven votes wrapping up the marathon session. The nonbinding vote marked Vitter's latest salvo in an ongoing crusade  against congressional enrollment in Obamacare.  

"This amendment would say no, we're going to live by that statute. We're going to go to the exchange for our health care. No special subsidy, no special deal, and it would also apply to the president, the vice president and their political appointees," Vitter said, making clear it wouldn't pertain to congressional aides.  

Sen. Barbara Boxer, D-Calif., refuted the idea of there being anything special about getting a health care subsidy.  

"Today every single senator is treated like every single person in the country who works for a large employer. Those large employers all make a contribution to their employees' health care," Boxer said. "Now colleagues, you do not have to take that employer contribution. If you don't want it, give it back."  

Boxer added she assumes Vitter pays his subsidy back to the Treasury Department.  

One Democrat, Michael Bennet of Colorado, who faces the voters in 2016, joined Vitter, while three Republicans — Susan Collins of Maine, Lisa Murkowski of Alaska and Dan Coats of Indiana — voted no.  

Coats announced this week he won't seek reelection.  

As part of his crusade, Vitter has tried to attach the amendment to all kinds of legislation, including a low profile energy efficiency measure. But the senator, who wants to become governor of Louisiana, has learned he has the best leverage with must-pass measures like the budget.  

Vitter also tried taking on the House of Representatives, asking Speaker John A. Boehner to help him get information on Congress' small-business exchange applications. So far, House officials have shrugged off his request, writing it off as an attempt to score political points.  

Niels Lesniewski and Steven T. Dennis contributed to this report. Related:

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