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Obama Backs Cromnibus

President Barack Obama would sign the $1.1 trillion "cromnibus," with the White House urging Democrats to help put the bill over the top with passage of the bill in doubt later this afternoon. The rule for the bill passed narrowly 214-212 earlier Thursday. White House Press Secretary Josh Earnest announced the president's support Thursday afternoon, saying the 1,600-page bill represented a compromise and included items the president did not support on campaign finance and regulating banks involvement in derivatives. But he noted that it does not undo Obamacare, does not stop the president's executive action on immigration, or curtail his sweeping climate change agenda, among other items. The move could help sway Democratic votes in the House, where a number of Democrats have announced plans to vote know over the campaign finance and banking hitchhikers. Here's the full Statement of Administrative Policy:  The Administration supports House passage of H.R. 83, making appropriations for fiscal year (FY) 2015, and for other purposes.  The Administration appreciates the bipartisan effort to include full-year appropriations legislation for most Government functions that allows for planning and provides certainty, while making progress toward appropriately investing in economic growth and opportunity, and adequately funding national security requirements.  The Administration also appreciates the authorities and funding provided to enhance the U.S. Government's response to the Ebola epidemic, and to implement the Administration's strategy to counter the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant, as well as investments for the President's early education agenda, Pell Grants, the bipartisan, Manufacturing Institutes initiative, and extension of the Trade Adjustment Assistance program. However, the Administration objects to the inclusion of ideological and special interest riders in the House bill. In particular, the Administration is opposed to the inclusion of a rider that would amend the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act and weaken a critical component of financial system reform aimed at reducing taxpayer risk.  Additionally, the Administration is opposed to inclusion of a rider that would amend the Federal Election Campaign Act to allow individual donors to contribute to national political party committee accounts for conventions, buildings and recounts in amounts that are dramatically higher than what the law currently permits. Furthermore, the Administration is disappointed that the bill would fund the Department of Homeland Security through February 27, 2015, at last year's levels.  Short-term continuing resolution funding measures are disruptive, create uncertainty, and impede efficient resource planning and execution. The Administration urges the Congress to enact comprehensive full-year appropriations legislation for all Government functions free of provisions that have no place in annual appropriations bills.  The 114th: CQ Roll Call's Guide to the New Congress Get breaking news alerts and more from Roll Call in your inbox or on your iPhone.