Dec. 22, 2014 SIGN IN | REGISTER
Download CQ Roll Call's Definitive Guide to the 114th Congress | Sign Up for Roll Call Newsletters | Get the Latest on the Roll Call App

Conservatives Seek More Spending Cuts in Debt Limit Strategy

Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call
Fleming said that, for him and many members of the conservative Republican Study Committee, any deal to raise the debt ceiling would have to be tied to a budget that would balance in 10 years “at a minimum.”

Looking to up the ante on debt limit negotiations, House conservatives will push to enact spending changes included in the House-passed budget in exchange for an increase in the nation’s debt ceiling.

The House Republican Conference will meet Wednesday afternoon to discuss the way forward on debt limit negotiations, and a conservative aide said that instead of making cuts to discretionary spending, members are seeking a structural overhaul.

“We do expect many conservatives to make the point that the debt ceiling needs to be tied to reforms from our House-passed budget that get us on a path to balance in 10 years, especially via mandatory spending that drives our debt,” the aide said.

Rep. John Fleming, R-La., said that, for him and many members of the conservative Republican Study Committee, any deal to raise the debt ceiling would have to be tied to a budget that would balance in 10 years “at a minimum.” The RSC will meet around noon Wednesday before heading to the conference meeting.

The primary overhaul in Budget Chairman Paul D. Ryan’s fiscal 2014 blueprint was the institution of a “premium support” model for Medicare that would be unlikely to gain traction with many Democrats in the Senate and White House.

Still, it is possible that the plan could be brought up as one of many during the two-hour meeting scheduled to begin at 3 p.m. in the Capitol.

Ryan’s budget also included steps to revamp the tax code, and a plan has already been floated to tie the debt limit to an agreement that a tax overhaul be taken up. House leaders are taking a hands-off approach leading up to the meeting, although many members have been cool toward a plan that does not include spending cuts.

“Certainly tax reform could be a part of the conversation, entitlement reform could be a part of the conversation, other spending cuts could be a part of this,” a House GOP leadership aide said.

While Speaker John A. Boehner of Ohio and his leadership team are expected to address the group, it is not likely they will present any ideas. Instead, leadership is expecting to hear a wide array of opinions from the members, reserving the bulk of the time for the rank and file to step forward to address their colleagues.

comments powered by Disqus

SIGN IN




OR

SUBSCRIBE

Want Roll Call on your doorstep?