July 25, 2014 SIGN IN | REGISTER

Bringing Civic Engagement Into the 21st Century | Commentary

The 21st century has afforded us new technology that allows us tools to be connected in ways we never have been before. Social media and the mobile Web are bringing voices together every day, but, surprisingly, government is still clinging to outdated methods when it comes to driving civic engagement.

The number of Americans using mobile technology is staggering ó nearly 60 percent of Americans now own a smartphone, up from just 46 percent in February 2012. And by 2015, itís predicted that 65 percent of Americans will own a smartphone, tablet or both.

Citizens arenít just playing Angry Birds ó theyíre using devices to keep up with current events and engage with other community members in new ways. A recent Pew Internet poll found that, when using their smartphones, 64 percent of Americans read the news, 68 percent access a social-networking site, and 31 percent visit a local, state or federal government website. Why, then, have government officials not latched on to this medium to drive engagement?

At the federal level, there has been some attempt to hear citizen concerns, but the barriers to entry are high. The White Houseís We the People site allows citizens to sign online petitions on issues that matter to them, but a petition needs 100,000 signatures to receive a response from the White House.

According to a recent report from the Congressional Research Service, 83.4 percent of congressional representatives and senators are registered on Twitter, and 90 percent are registered on Facebook. Still, the level of engagement with citizens on these platforms is relatively low ó registered members send an average of ď1.24 Tweets and .63 Facebook posts per day.Ē In fact, the top 20 percent of congressional members using Twitter and Facebook accounted for a whopping 50 percent of all tweets and posts during the study. Itís promising that so many congressional leaders have recognized the need to have a presence on these platforms, but posting one tweet per day doesnít do much to engage citizens or earn feedback on key issues.

On the state level, government leaders rarely use mobile technology to fuel civic engagement. Legislators still largely pool citizen ideas by holding in-person meetings, such as planning public events, but these arenít efficient for collecting large pools of data on key issues.

But there is some hope. Federal and state government leaders may be ignoring mobile technology trends, but on the local level some cities have chosen to implement technology like my companyís to get citizen feedback. iLegislate is a mobile app that allows government leaders to connect and seek feedback from community members. They can use social platforms such as Facebook and Twitter to gain feedback, and citizens can share ideas, vote in polls and comment on agenda items. iLegislate then crunches the data and brings it directly to a legislatorís mobile device, making it easily accessible when itís needed most ó right before making decisions or voting on key agenda items.

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