Dec. 26, 2014 SIGN IN | REGISTER
Download CQ Roll Call's Definitive Guide to the 114th Congress | Sign Up for Roll Call Newsletters | Get the Latest on the Roll Call App

A Dispatch From Dave Brat's College: Teaching Politics at the Center of a Political Storm | Commentary

Thanks to Eric Cantor, at least one part of my job should be much easier this year: getting my students to pay attention to local political races.

I teach politics at Randolph-Macon College, a small liberal arts institution just north of Richmond, Va. Our school has a sterling local reputation, but not much of a national profile.

Of course, all of that changed when one of my colleagues, economics professor Dave Brat, toppled the House majority leader in his Republican primary. Blindsided by Dave’s win, the national media were even more flabbergasted when they found out his Democratic opponent in the general election would be another colleague, Jack Trammell.

The resulting media firestorm briefly turned our sleepy college town of Ashland upside down. We’re not country rubes; we recruit students from across the country and internationally, and our faculty is engaged in public life and prominent scholarship. But we have never had a member of our community run for Congress, let alone against a colleague. Seeing these men featured in top stories on CNN and Fox News has lent a surreal air to the campus.

A few of my summer students are taking a study skills course with Jack Trammell. They could not believe it when I told them he could be their next congressman. “Wait, that guy? He’s running for Congress? You’d never know it!”

Current students are more aware. But rather than take sides in the race, they’re just happy to have attention focused on the college. Summer’s student diaspora has dampened excitement on campus; instead the clamor is online. Facebook blew up in the week after the primary, with students excitedly forwarding links and criticizing any perceived slight in media coverage. (A frequent complaint: “It’s Randolph-Macon COLLEGE, not University, bro.”) More than a few used the #Brammell hashtag, suggesting that the outcome is unimportant.

Yet each candidate has his supporters. Our active Young Democrats group is mostly a Facebook presence right now, but Jack will be able to mobilize them for volunteer work in the fall if he chooses. Still, they are a dozen students against a more grown-up “Brat Pack,” as Dave is calling his tea party-ish followers. Dave is well-respected on campus as well, with a cadre of fiercely loyal students. A neighbor of mine, an alum, took Dave’s classes more than 15 years ago. In the days before the primary, she was desperately trying to find out if she was in his district so she could cast a vote for him.

Faculty also have been chattering online and off, but most of those who live in the Congressional district are not exactly excited. Our student body runs conservative, but my colleagues reflect the political makeup of a typical liberal arts faculty. Dave has always run against the grain in that way, with some minor tensions surfacing in previous years over the grant money he received from a conservative foundation.

comments powered by Disqus

SIGN IN




OR

SUBSCRIBE

Want Roll Call on your doorstep?