Nov. 27, 2014 SIGN IN | REGISTER
Roll Call Casualty List: See Which Incumbents Lost | Check Results Here With Our Interactive Elections Map | Sign Up for Roll Call Newsletters

Voting Amid the Devastation From Sandy

Douglas Graham/CQ Roll Call File Photo
Rep. Christopher Murphy is running for Senate in Connecticut, a state that was hit hard by Hurricane Sandy. The close contest could be affected by the storm damage.

In some parts of New York, election returns may not be available until during the day on Wednesday.

William Biamonte, the Democratic commissioner of elections in Nassau County on Long Island said there's no chance some parts of the region will have power back by Tuesday. He said the commission would work to "get as much normalcy as possible" by having as many voters as possible go to their normal polling sites, either on generator power or without power.

In precincts without generators, voters would fill out optical scan ballots on paper which would then be transported to another location with electricity to be run through the optical scan machines, significantly delaying the tabulation process.

One of the communities that may have polls open without power is Long Beach, which will be in the redrawn 4th Congressional district that is likely to be represented by Democratic Rep. Carolyn McCarthy.

On Thursday evening, the Nassau County police department was working to reach all the polling places that have not been accessed since Sandy tore through the area to assess the situation. Biamonte said coordination with state officials has worked well so far.

"I have no complaints with Albany as of yet," he said.

The size and scope of the historic storm could be seen as far away as the presidential battleground of Ohio, where almost a quarter of a million customers lost power in the northeastern part of the state, but Ohio Secretary of State Jon Husted (R) does not foresee trouble there.

“We’ve not had any instances of disruption in Postal Service delivery as it relates to our ballots in Ohio,” Husted said on CNBC. “Early voting is going well, people are turning out early — which means that that lessens the likelihood that there could be lines at the polls on Election Day.”

Joshua Miller and Abby Livingston contributed to this report.

comments powered by Disqus

SIGN IN




OR

SUBSCRIBE

Want Roll Call on your doorstep?