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House Schedule Is Tight, Political

Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo
House Majority Whip Kevin McCarthy said the chamber will push energy bills.

House Republican Policy Committee Chairman Tom Price said he thinks Senate Democrats are the ones holding up the process, and he indicated that he thinks the president, seeking re-election, is to blame.

“We see a Senate that refuses to act. My sense is we see a president who is not encouraging [Senate Majority Leader Harry] Reid [D-Nev.] to actually be productive, that they’re just waiting for the election to occur,” the Georgia Republican said in an interview taped for C-SPAN’s “Newsmakers.”

A slew of other issues are sure to compete for attention this week as well.

Obama’s executive action to curb deportations of some undocumented immigrants who came to the country as children has already sparked passionate statements from Democrats and Republicans, and a House GOP aide said outcry from Members could lead to some leadership action on the topic.

This week the House will also get its crack at JPMorgan Chase & Co. CEO Jamie Dimon when the banker testifies Tuesday before the Financial Services Committee.

According to Republicans, he might get a much more difficult reception than he did from the Senate Banking Committee last week, when he testified about a
$2 billion trading loss and was treated with politeness and even some flattery.

Despite the banking giant’s troubles and continued public anger at the industry in general, Senators were remarkably cordial to Dimon, and the hearing was widely derided as a lost opportunity to hold him publicly accountable for his company’s contributions to the troubled economy.

Of course, the whole schedule could be upended if the Supreme Court issues its long-awaited decision on Obama’s health care reform law.

The court typically issues decisions on Mondays, and some Congressional staffers said they are anticipating a decision June 25, rather than today.

If that is the case, it buys House Republicans one more week to discuss their options. They have promised a full repeal measure if the court doesn’t strike down the entire law itself. But the next step is unclear.

John Stanton contributed to this report.

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