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Race Ratings: Handful of Seats for Grabs After Fla. Reshuffle

22nd district
New Seat
Rating: Leans Democratic

This seat got a whole lot more Democratic in redistricting — so much so, that West decided to run somewhere else.

Subsequently, former state House Majority Leader Adam Hasner (R) dropped his Senate bid and decided to run here. He is almost certain to be the GOP nominee. There are points that will work to his advantage in the general: He represented a chunk of the district during his time in the state Legislature, so some voters will be familiar with him; Hasner is Jewish, like many voters in the new district; and he had $667,000 in his federal account at the end of 2012.

But the voters here are Democratic and would have voted 57 percent for President Barack Obama in 2008. And Hasner spent almost a year tacking hard to right in an attempt to win the GOP nomination for Senate.

"Republicans don't need to be less partisan," Hasner often said on the campaign trail. "Republicans need to be more principled." That's not an argument that will play well overall in this district.

He's picked up endorsements from Florida Republican superstars such as Sen. Marco Rubio and former Gov. Jeb Bush, but it's unclear if that will help him in the general election.

There's a contentious primary on the Democratic side between Broward County Commissioner Kristin Jacobs and former West Palm Beach Mayor Lois Frankel. Frankel, who has been in the race for months and had a few boffo fundraising quarters, has the edge in the primary and is expected by Democratic strategists to win. That leaves Democrats feeling pretty good about the race.

"Two Jewish candidates from Palm Beach: We win that," said the influential Tallahassee Democratic operative.

The numbers in the district do make it a rough slog for Hasner. "It's such a good district that a Republican has to work pretty hard to overcome it," said one Democratic consultant in the state.

23rd district
Incumbent: Debbie Wasserman Schultz (D)
4th term (60 percent)
Rating: Safe Democratic

Late last year, walking down the steps of the Capitol one evening after votes, Wasserman Schultz was asked whether she would be a target of Republican map-drawers, given her position as the chairwoman of the Democratic National Committee.

"I'm sure they are going to do their best to make my life difficult but that's OK," she said with a laugh. "It comes with the territory."

Wasserman Schultz was given a slightly less Democratic district in the redraw, but it's still incredibly comfortable turf for her. In a presidential year, without any serious opposition, she should easily best her margin of victory from 2010.

24th district
Incumbent: Frederica Wilson (D)
1st term (86 percent)
Rating: Safe Democratic

The hats will return to the 113th Congress. Wilson, a former school principal known for her collection of ornate headwear, has the safest Democratic seat in the state. She doesn't face a serious primary challenge and should continue to represent the majority-minority district for another term.

25th district
Incumbent: Mario Diaz-Balart (R)
5th term (Unopposed)
Rating: Safe Republican

Diaz-Balart keeps about half of his current district under the new map, but he retains an easy route to another term. The 25th is the most Republican of the three South Florida Hispanic-majority Republican districts, and the Congressman faces no real challenges to re-election.

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