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Hill Life Archive

What To Do in D.C.'s In-Between Times

Well, we all know what we’ll be doing in two weeks: sweating out election returns. And next week is Halloween. But what about this week — particularly if you’re not on the trail or otherwise — should you find yourself in Washington, D.C.?

Late-Night Terrorism Drills Test D.C. Officials

Police in the District of Columbia responded to a staged suicide bombing shortly after 9 p.m. Sunday, on the former Walter Reed Army Medical Center site in Northwest Washington.

National Christmas Tree Lighting Lottery Starts

Decorations might stay off the shelves until after Halloween, but if you want to see the Dec. 4 National Christmas Tree lighting on the White House Ellipse this year, you better get your head wrapped around the holidays at least for this week.

Could Nov. 4 Results Render D.C.'s Budget Autonomy Case Moot?

More than 40 years after President Richard M. Nixon signed the Home Rule Act, legal experts in the District of Columbia are fighting about what the feds intended.

Grazing Wars: Grass March Cowboys Ride to Capitol Hill

A Prius driver pulled up next to the horse trailer parked on Maryland Avenue midday Thursday, a block southwest of the Capitol, and asked Nevada ranch hand George Martin what issue brought him to Washington.

Official Confirms 12 Ebola Investigations in D.C.

At least a dozen Ebola cases have been investigated in the District of Columbia, the director of the city’s Department of Health disclosed Thursday, but no one has tested positive for the disease.

Harvard Welcomes New Members With 4-Day Orientation

It isn’t easy for new members of Congress to sit down and talk openly with lawmakers from the other side of the aisle — cameras are ever-present, reporters are never far away and there isn’t exactly a lot of love between the two major parties.

Recent Grad Seeks Press Secretary Spot

Hill press secretary: great job OR greatest job? Hill Navigator personally understands the grandeur and appeal of the communications world. So how to get there? Some suggestions below.

Oops: Upside-Down Flag Mars D.C. Voter Guide

District of Columbia residents might be confused to see an upside-down D.C. flag on the cover of the official voter guide being shipped out in advance of the Nov. 4 elections.

Watchdogs Want Stronger Congressional Ethics Office

Despite its small staff of nine and a slim operating budget of about $1.5 million, the Office of Congressional Ethics has managed to achieve tangible victories in the House, according to sources once skeptical the agency could accomplish its mission.

Obamacare Lawsuit Challenges Congress' 'Small Business' Status

The conservative group Judicial Watch filed a lawsuit Wednesday alleging that members of Congress and congressional staffers who enrolled in health care via the D.C. small business exchange did so illegally.

Are You an Expert? Ways to Tell

Among all the hard-working, necktie-to-the-grindstone staffers out there, you’ll notice common themes: All are smart; all are well-connected, and all claim to be “experts.” Sure, the expertise might be in constituent mail merges or flag requests, but such mundane knowledge is valuable. So how can you tell if you’re truly an “expert” in Capitol Hill parlance? Hill Navigator discusses.

With Malice Toward Some: 'Lincoln and the Power of the Press' Elucidates Symbiotic Relationship Between Politicians and Journalists

The haze of nostalgia often blinds people to the problems of the past. This is especially true in politics and journalism, where current practitioners love to wax rhapsodic about how great things were in the good old days, when everybody got along and drank whiskey with each other and were regular old pals.

Capitol Police Replenish Their Ranks After Hiring Freeze

CHELTENHAM, Md. — Forearms pressed into the black asphalt, the Capitol Police’s 179th class of recruits shook and dripped with sweat in their third minute of planks. It was near 10 a.m. on an 80-degree morning in mid-September, and since 7 a.m. they had been performing squats, crunches and a particularly grueling training drill requiring them to drag a 165 pound dummy 40 feet.

'Special Treatment' for Congress Inspires Another Obamacare Lawsuit

This time it’s not a lawmaker, but an outside conservative group that plans to file suit over alleged “special treatment” for members of Congress enrolled in gold-level coverage plans through DC Health Link.

Benghazi Attack Suspect Indicted With 17 New Charges

The Libyan national being prosecuted for his alleged participation in the September 2012 terrorist attacks in Benghazi faces charges that could be punishable by death, following an indictment by a federal grand jury in the District of Columbia on Tuesday.

Zimbabwe Lobbying Case Yields Another Conviction

A Chicago man who bragged to Zimbabwe President Robert Mugabe in 2008 about his close ties to then President-Elect Barack Obama was convicted Friday of violating federal law as he lobbied for relief of sanctions against the African nation.

Tom Colicchio Helps Mark World Food Day in D.C.

Perhaps no other city in the United States provides the platform to address food issues better than Washington, D.C., a culinary hot-spot that also provides a public policy forum in the seat of government.

Gray Signs D.C. Handgun Law to 'Cure Alleged Constitutional Flaws'

With little fanfare, Mayor Vincent Gray signed legislation Thursday evening legalizing the concealed carry of handguns in the District of Columbia in response to a lawsuit brought against the city by Second Amendment advocates.

Will Bowser Push Democrats on D.C. Statehood?

National Democrats parachuted into local District of Columbia politics this week to bolster D.C. Councilmember Muriel Bowser’s campaign to succeed Mayor Vincent Gray, but neither President Barack Obama nor Democratic National Committee Chairwoman Debbie Wasserman Schultz made any promises to use their political capital on behalf of residents’ longtime goal.

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