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Congress' Top Travelers Say Globetrotting on Private Dime Essential

Congress' Top Travelers Say Globetrotting on Private Dime Essential
Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo

As one of the top travelers in Congress, Colorado Democrat Diana DeGette likes to give this advice to incoming House freshmen: “Pick one or two countries and really get deeply involved in the politics and culture.”

Kojo, Will and Roll Call on the Hill

If the voice of Kojo Nnamdi sounds different starting on Monday, it could be he’s channeling the Bard.

Jim Moran Doesn't Miss Congress

For the record, ex-Rep. James P. Moran doesn’t miss Congress. At least, “not yet.”

5 Potential Scenarios for D.C.'s Marijuana Initiative

The ongoing battle over the District of Columbia’s marijuana policy is currently at a standstill, but several scenarios over the coming weeks could alter its fate.

Answers on Paid Leave Hard for Staffers to Find

If a member of Congress has a generous parental leave policy but the staff doesn’t know about it, what’s it worth?

Heritage Action Urges Congress to Reject D.C. Bills

Heritage Action for America, a conservative advocacy group, is calling on Congress to reject two District of Columbia Council bills, which, the group argues, infringe upon religious liberty. It is the first time the group has weighed in on a District initiative.


A Mild Journey to the Heart of Pentagon City (Video)

“You can’t be subtle in this town.”

Bowser Talks Marijuana, Statehood With Boehner

Bowser Talks Marijuana, Statehood With Boehner

D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser headed to Capitol Hill Tuesday to discuss local issues with lawmakers, including Speaker John A. Boehner.

Conviction of Reid Bundler Upheld, Next Stop: SCOTUS?

A prominent Nevada lobbyist convicted of making illegal contributions to Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid’s 2010 re-election campaign is preparing to ask the Supreme Court to revisit campaign finance limits, following a Monday federal appeals court decision.

Cannon Parking Garage Now for Members Only (Updated)

New parking rules adopted Tuesday dictate that only members of Congress will be allowed to park in the Cannon House Office Building parking garage.

Late Congressman's Wife on Quest for Missing Cash, Memorabilia

Late Congressman's Wife on Quest for Missing Cash, Memorabilia

SEMINOLE, Fla. — What happens when a member of Congress dies in office? There is no standard set procedure and the internecine melee that followed the death of Rep. C.W. Bill Young, perhaps best illustrated by the exhaustive search for a handful of pictures and one Pentagon-approved memento, has ruined decades-old friendships and frayed family bonds seemingly beyond repair.

Driver Arrested in SOTU Car Chase

Police in Maryland’s Prince George’s County have arrested the driver who skirted Capitol Hill on State of the Union night in a high-speed chase.

Even Among Supporters, Paid Parental Leave for Capitol Hill Staff Varies

Even for Congress’ most ardent supporters of paid maternity and paternity leave, there is wide variance in their own office policies.

White House Drone Raises Questions About D.C., Capitol Policy

A small drone found on the White House lawn caused some lawmakers to question the Federal Aviation Administration’s drone policy in the District of Columbia Monday.

Getting Beyond Budget Scorekeeper's Perennial 'Pissing Contest'

Can the new director of the Congressional Budget Office get “beyond the basic pissing contest” of how to score legislation? The former heads of the official scorekeeping agency hope so.

Periodical Press Committee Takes Shape for 114th Congress

As the 114th Congress goes into full swing, the congressional press corps is also getting situated, electing new representatives to ensure they have access to lawmakers throughout Capitol Hill.

The Two-Second Shot

The Two-Second Shot

Many times on the Hill, a photographer has to guess which direction someone will go, how many photographers will be there already, what the light situation will be and numerous other scenarios.

Driver in SOTU Police Chase Had No License, Police Say

An officer on the scene of the State of the Union night car chase through Capitol Police jurisdiction says the man briefly handcuffed by police, then allowed to drive away did not have a driver’s license.

U.S. Conference of Mayors Moving Past Congressional Gridlock

Mayors from across the nation have a message for Congress: Gridlock means mayors have had to pick up the slack.

Standing Committee of Correspondents Election Decided by Coin Toss

The late-night Senate votes weren’t the only drama on Capitol Hill Thursday. Up in the Senate Daily Press Gallery, an election to fill a spot on the Standing Committee of Correspondents for the Daily Press came down to a coin toss.

Lawmakers Define Oversight Role in L'Enfant Metro Incident

Members of Congress are looking to flex their oversight muscles, after summoning national and local transportation officials to Capitol Hill on Wednesday evening to brief them on the recent deadly incident at the L’Enfant Plaza Metro Station.

Chilling Out Is What It’s All About at the Dolcezza Factory

The little, local gelato maker that could has come a long way from solely dishing scoops of handmade refreshment to college kids and thrusting samples in the faces of those perusing different stalls at the farmers market. The decade-long trek to the top of the frozen dessert heap in D.C. has culminated in the development of the bright, welcoming Dolcezza Factory at 550 Penn St. NE that took up residence in the shadow of next-gen shopping hub Union Market last winter.

McConnell's Sergeant-at-Arms Team's Time Together Goes Way Back (Audio)

The two men at the helm of the Senate Sergeant-at-Arms office first crossed paths nearly two decades ago as staffers on the chamber’s Appropriations Committee.

Norton: Union Bill Is 'First Attack' on D.C. Autonomy in 114th Congress

Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton, D-D.C., said Tuesday that Republicans have launched their “first attack” on District of Columbia autonomy in the 114th Congress in a bill that would make violence from labor union organizing a federal crime.

Former Staffer, Cancer Advocate Chip Kennett Dies at 34

Former Staffer, Cancer Advocate Chip Kennett Dies at 34

Updated Jan. 19 | Bayard Winslow “Chip” Kennett II, a former Capitol Hill staffer whose personal battle with lung cancer helped push Congress to take action, died Saturday. He was 34.

Chaffetz Allowed to Move Oversight Chairmen Portraits

The walls of the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee room were bare Thursday afternoon, with a handful of tiny holes where portraits of past committee chairmen once hung.

House Sergeant-at-Arms: Congress Is a Top Terrorist Target

As the Capitol Hill community digests news of a foiled ISIS-inspired plot to bomb and shoot the complex, law enforcement officials are reminding congressional offices the Capitol is a top target for terrorists.

Norton Introduces D.C. Statehood Bill Despite New Hurdles

In the face of likely opposition from the Republican-led 114th Congress, Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton, D-D.C., reintroduced the “New Columbia Admission Act” Tuesday, which would make the District of Columbia the 51st state.

How to Ace the Business Lunch

Forget the sunrise diner special, or candlelit, white tablecloth dinners. If you’re going to eat one meal properly in Washington, D.C., it should be the power lunch. The power lunch is the ideal midday break, a mini-vacation to the day, a chance to hear the lobby pitches while nibbling on veal tagliatelle or steak frites, perhaps eyeing the room to see nearby diners who would warrant a quick tip to Heard on the Hill.

D.C. Marijuana Initiative Transmitted to Congress

Day one of the standoff between the District of Columbia and Congress over marijuana legalization in D.C. kicked off Tuesday, as the initiative legalizing possession and cultivation of small amounts of marijuana was transmitted to Congress for review.

Je Suis Charlie

Je Suis Charlie

Capitol Quip takes a moment of silence this week to mourn the victims of the massacre at the offices of Charlie Hebdo; to celebrate the French people for their love of liberty, their passion for intellectual debate, and their venerable tradition of satire and to honor the spirit of the cartoonists who died defending the inalienable right to make irreverent images.

Police Supporters Planning 'Sea of Blue' March on Capitol

Hundreds of police officers are expected to converge on the Capitol later this month, in a rally planned to show support for law enforcement and counter what organizers view as an anti-police climate.

Democrat Adam Smith Likely Out of Congressional Baseball Game

Rep. Adam Smith likely won’t be playing in the upcoming Roll Call Congressional Baseball Game, due to hip problems.

DC Government: OPM Trumps Local Law on Congressional Health Care

In an ongoing lawsuit challenging congressional health care enrollment, the D.C. government acknowledged that local law does not recognize Congress as a small business — which is seemingly necessary for it to have employees enroll in the small-business exchange. But, officials argued that federal regulations trump the local law, allowing enrollment to continue.

'The Great War' Memorial's Great Journey

Achieving approval to establish a national World War I memorial in the District of Columbia took longer than the war itself.

Ceremonies, Reflection and Chaos Define the First Day of Congress

For new members of the 114th Congress, their first day was a blur — and not just because the view of the Capitol was obscured by falling snow.

The Best News Sources for Staffers to Read

Are you reading this while at your desk? On your smartphone on the Metro? Maybe you get Hill Navigator delivered directly to your inbox. But how do you know if you’re reading the best news sources to do your job effectively? Hill Navigator discusses.

GOP Moves to Shore Up Rules for Congressional Caucus Employees

After revelations that may have hurt the Republican brand, House Majority Whip Steve Scalise is pushing through a rule change that could strengthen the largest member organizations, such as the Republican Study Committee, in the 114th Congress.

From 'Printing' to 'Publishing': The GPO Has a New Name

The U.S. Government Printing Office has officially become the Government Publishing Office, after President Barack Obama signed the year-end “cromnibus” spending package late Tuesday night.

The House Day Care Waitlist Isn't Getting Any Shorter

Good news for early childhood education.

House Ethics: An Isolating Gavel to Hold

Come January, Rep. K. Michael Conaway won’t have to worry about scaring away his friends on Capitol Hill.

Report Outlines Constituent Meeting Do's and Don'ts

Constituent participation is the key to scheduling meetings on Capitol Hill, according to a new report from the Congressional Management Foundation.

Eisenhower Memorial Plan Still Faces Skepticism, Despite Approvals

Capitol Hill’s representatives on the Dwight D. Eisenhower Memorial Commission remain skeptical the monument to the 34th president will break ground next year, despite rosy projections from commission staff.

How to Negotiate Anything: Lessons Learned From the Capitol Leaders Program

Forty House and Senate foreign affairs and national security staffers came together recently at George Washington University’s Elliott School of International Affairs to learn the necessary skills to overcome gridlock in Congress. The program was organized by the Partnership for a Secure America and Harvard Law School’s Program on Negotiation. The bridge to bipartisanship, it seems, will be built by cooperative staffers.

DCanter Uncorks Concierge Service

DCanter Uncorks Concierge Service

DCanter wine shop wants to make enjoying a relaxing bottle (or 12) so easy, staff will do everything — short of strolling into your kitchen and topping off a balloon goblet — to speed the process along via a new custom-ordering program.

Hiking Arizona's Gabe Zimmerman Trail

DAVIDSON CANYON, Ariz. — The bike rack at the Gabe Zimmerman Trailhead here is a twisted oxidized metal coil molded to look like a rattlesnake. It’s a small bit of whimsy amid a majestic part of the 800-plus-mile Arizona Trail dedicated to the victims of a dark chapter in the Grand Canyon State’s history.

Capitol Dome Braces for Next Phase of Restoration

With frigid winds whipping around the 288 foot-tall Capitol Dome, Architect of the Capitol Stephen T. Ayers said the next phase of the nearly $60 million restoration project has begun.

Collections Pool Art Resources for El Greco

The 400th anniversary of El Greco’s death this year put the National Gallery of Art in an unusual bind. As keepers of one of the largest collections of the painter’s work outside of Spain, curators made a priority of loaning four of their prized pieces to exhibits abroad. That complicated efforts to mount their own commemoration of an artist whose startlingly modernist style, with its vivid colors and elongated figures, has spawned centuries of praise and criticism.

Cheese Making Its Way Into D.C. Culture

“You don’t want to disturb the milk,” Genevieve O’Sullivan said as she slowly poured the white liquid into a plastic container. “That would break the fat molecules. Pour it like you pour champagne.”

How to Land a Job Working for a New Member of Congress

The congressional job search goes into overdrive every two years, as each election brings new members of Congress looking to hire staff. Working for a new member can be so much fun — you get all the optimism, good will and eagerness of Congress without the jaded, pessimistic edge (at least not yet). But how do you land one of those coveted spots? Hill Navigator discusses.

Party Like It's 1844

An ambitious Kentucky lawmaker. A president mistrusted by his own party. Texas taking on an outsize role in Congress. Is this 2014, with Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell waiting gleefully to seize the majority, President Barack Obama under withering criticism from Democrats marooned in the minority and Lone Star Sens. John Cornyn and Ted Cruz ready to take up spheres of influence in the Senate?

The Have-Nots: 132 Members Show Negative Net Worth

While the wealth of Congress surged $150 million last year and at least a third of federal lawmakers are millionaires, there’s a sizable group of have-nots in Congress too.

With Malice Toward Some: 'Lincoln and the Power of the Press' Elucidates Symbiotic Relationship Between Politicians and Journalists

The haze of nostalgia often blinds people to the problems of the past. This is especially true in politics and journalism, where current practitioners love to wax rhapsodic about how great things were in the good old days, when everybody got along and drank whiskey with each other and were regular old pals.

Capitol Police Replenish Their Ranks After Hiring Freeze

CHELTENHAM, Md. — Forearms pressed into the black asphalt, the Capitol Police’s 179th class of recruits shook and dripped with sweat in their third minute of planks. It was near 10 a.m. on an 80-degree morning in mid-September, and since 7 a.m. they had been performing squats, crunches and a particularly grueling training drill requiring them to drag a 165 pound dummy 40 feet.

Secrets From Capitol Hill's Back Rooms: How to Get Hired on the Hill

Want that Capitol Hill job? Doesn’t “congressional staffer” have such a nice ring to it?

The Maine Attraction: Getting a Taste of the Chellie Pingree Experience

ROCKLAND, Maine — Once aboard the boat that will speed us to North Haven, a Connecticut man opens up about his affinity for the Pine Tree State.

A Hard Rock Day's Night

If there is an epicenter of the Washington Tourist-Industrial Complex, it may very well be the Hard Rock Cafe in Penn Quarter.

Portraits of Committee Chairmen: They're Up the Wall

A House chairman usually ends up hanging around the committee room years after he or she retires.

Dads on Capitol Hill: House Paternity Leave Varies Widely

Matt Dennis wasn’t used to making reporters wait for a response. But when he was on paternity leave, his newborn son Jonah took priority over his boss, Democratic Rep. Nita M. Lowey of New York, so he put the BlackBerry aside.

Segs in the City: They're Just Not That Into You

In a city such as D.C., with its infinite possibilities, had Segway tours become too much to endure? The answer is no, thanks to Segs in the City and their friends forever at the Institute of Justice, who sued to get rid of that D.C. rite of passage.

The Quick Guide to 'Best Intern Ever: How to Ace Your Capitol Hill Internship'

Interns are busy. Most everyone in D.C. is busy. But as longtime Hill Navigator readers may have noticed, this week we launched the first Roll Call e-book: Best Intern Ever: How to Ace Your Capitol Hill Internship.

Adventures in Babysitting: Getting Into the House Day Care

Adventures in Babysitting: Getting Into the House Day Care

Thinking about starting a family? Interested in having kids, but not sure when?

Beginner’s Guide to Political Reporting Jobs

So you want to be a reporter? You want to join the profession listed as among the worst jobs of 2014, at a time when publishing industry is going through a “period of turmoil”?

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