July 9, 2014 SIGN IN | REGISTER

Man Bites Dogs -- A Case for D.C.'s Meats

Man Bites Dogs -- A Case for D.C.'s Meats
Warren Rojas
Qs Seoul dog at DC3 packs a punch with kimchi and bulgogi adorning an all-beef frank.

The sea of flag-waving tourists flooding the National Mall has (thankfully) receded. And the cacophony of thunderous pyrotechnics that traumatized skittish pets for miles around is fast becoming a distant memory.

Embezzlement Charges Against Capitol Police Officer Stir Up Criticism of Department Hiring

A guilty plea to embezzlement charges from the head of the Capitol Police’s Office of Diversity provoked U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia Judge Richard J. Leon to exclaim, “I’ve never seen anything like this in my 12 years here.”

Activists Ready to Fight Rand Paul's D.C. Gun Amendment in Senate (Updated)

Updated 3:12 p.m. | Activists on the national and local level are gearing up for the ensuing gun fight surrounding amendments to the Senate’s bipartisan hunting and fishing legislation, especially a proposal related to firearm control in the District of Columbia.

An Appreciation of Alan Dixon

It was December 1988, and I was three weeks into my new job working for Sen. Alan J. Dixon, D-Ill., when I picked up the phone and heard from the mayor of a small town 125 miles from Chicago.

Health Insurance for Congress and Staff: It's Complicated

As members of Congress and their staffs head into their second year of enrollment in D.C.’s health exchange, they’ll decide among plans that range from a double-digit increase to a double-digit percent decrease in premiums, even as providers go in different directions that will result in fewer overall plans to choose from.

Washington's Biggest Repertory Cinema: The Great Outdoors

The outdoor summer movie circuit is in full swing, with plenty of al fresco viewing to go around in Washington, including the grande dame herself, the upcoming Screen on the Green on the National Mall.

What You Missed: An Independence Day Parade in 69 Seconds (Video)

When Independence Day rolls around in an election year, the Roll Call photojournalists head out to small towns in contested districts across the country to catch candidates and beauty queens marching in their local parades. This year I found myself at the Ripley, W.Va., Fourth of July parade billed as “The USA’s Largest Small Town Independence Day Celebration.”

Waiting for the 'SuperJob'

Like your job? But what if there is something out there even better for you — fancier title, higher tax bracket, maybe even a MacBook Air? How do you decide when to leave a good job for something that could be better? Hill Navigator discusses.

Bloopers: Roll Call Congressional Baseball Game

The Roll Call Congressional Baseball Game can be a real challenge for a political photographer like me. Although I used to be a really good sports photographer — having covered every level of competition from tee ball to the Olympics in my days working for daily newspapers — one gets a bit rusty shooting slow-moving lawmakers around the Capitol full time.

Luke's Butters Up Union Station Diners

Summering in New England has never been easier.

Beginner’s Guide to Political Reporting Jobs

So you want to be a reporter? You want to join the profession listed as among the worst jobs of 2014, at a time when publishing industry is going through a “period of turmoil”?

Madame Tussauds' Terrifying D.C. Presence

The most terrifying thing about the Madame Tussauds D.C. wax museum outpost is the fact that designers grouped ex-Washington Wizard Gilbert Arenas with Babe Ruth and Jesse Owens. Of all the indignities to endure, the Sultan of Swat and the man who showed up Adolf Hitler at the 1936 Olympic Games have to share a platform with a guy whose claim to fame is bringing a gun to the Wizards’ locker room.

Capitol Police Pull Internal Magazine for Slur

A racist slur printed in the June 2014 issue of the Capitol Police’s internal journal caused the department to pull the publication from circulation.

Self-Proclaimed 'Senate Comedian' Shows His 'Caucasian Skills' (Audio)

Scanning the crowd in the back room of a downtown D.C. sports bar, Senate doorkeeper Scott Muschett, the self-proclaimed “Senate Comedian,” decided the script for his five minutes at the mic was all wrong.

Norton Challenger Thinks a Transformed District Deserves a New Delegate

While Washington’s streetscape, city government and demographics have changed dramatically over the past quarter-century, its representation in Congress has stayed constant over roughly the same period of time.

Memo to Capitol Hill Staff: Work Fewer Hours

Brigid Schulte is late.

John Quincy Adams: A Renaissance Politician and a Miserable Old Sod

The subtitle of Fred Kaplan’s latest book, “John Quincy Adams: American Visionary” is working overtime to celebrate the diplomat, senator, secretary of State, president and member of the House whose long career yielded little that we remember today. What’s a biographer to do but emphasize the farsightedness?

For Breast-Feeding Moms Returning to Work: Speak Up

For new moms returning to work after maternity leave, having an up-front conversation with the boss can be difficult. Especially when it’s about breast-feeding.

Over Lincoln's Shoulder

When Abraham Lincoln took up residence in the White House in March 1861, he had five former occupants looking over his shoulder. No president ever had more. And what a motley crew they were.

Street Separating Capitol From Supreme Court Could Become 'D.C. No Taxation Without Representation Way'

The D.C. Council answered Congress’ request to christen a city street on behalf of a pro-democracy cause with a request of its own: Let’s give streets surrounding Congress a new, pro-D.C. rights label.

Play, Y'all! Best Food And Drink Bets for Baseball Fans

No need to check your WeatherBug app: Summer is in full swing.

Degas/Cassatt Exhibit Leaves Quite an Impression

Sometimes, the story behind a great painting is literally found behind the painting. Consider Mary Cassatt’s 1878 impressionist gem “Little Girl in a Blue Armchair.”

Georgetown Cupcake; or, the Wait

Call me cupcake skeptical. Some days ago — never mind how long precisely — having little or nothing to do on a Saturday, and nothing particular to interest me otherwise, I thought I would stand in line at the original Georgetown Cupcake.

Adventures in Babysitting: Getting Into the House Day Care

Thinking about starting a family? Interested in having kids, but not sure when?

Sid Yudain, Roll Call Founder, Laid to Rest

Sid Yudain, Roll Call Founder, Laid to Rest

ARLINGTON NATIONAL CEMETERY, Va. — Before he was Sid Yudain, founder and publisher of Roll Call newspaper, he was TEC 5 Sidney Lawrence Yudain, Detached Enlisted Men’s List, United States Army. The World War II veteran who died on Oct. 20, 2013, was laid to rest at the military’s hallowed ground here on Friday, interred at Columbarium 9, Section N26, Row 3, Niche 2.

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