July 31, 2014 SIGN IN | REGISTER

Seersucker Thursday: Ladies' Fashion Do's and Don'ts

Seersucker Thursday: Ladies' Fashion Do's and Don'ts
Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo

After two years, Seersucker Thursday finally returns to the Senate. Back in June, when the House side hosted its own seersucker celebration, HOH ran an item Seersucker Day: Trent Lott’s Fashion Do’s and Don’ts.

Harassment Complaints Up at the U.S. Capitol

U.S. Capitol employees are reporting more claims of discrimination and harassment — a 20 percent increase from the previous year, according to a report released Thursday by the Office of Compliance.

Digging In to the Kentucky Hot Brown

Digging In to the Kentucky Hot Brown

Thank you, Chris Pogue (wherever you may now be), for dispatching this food sleuth on one of the most delectable assignments to date.

D.C. Officials Plotting New Course to Keep Gun Control Intact (Updated)

Updated 7:30 p.m. | Though they won’t yet say how far they are willing to take their fight, District of Columbia officials plan to do everything in their power to limit the carrying of handguns in the nation’s capital, arguing that despite a court’s ruling that paves the way for more permissive laws, Washington is a unique place with heightened security concerns.

Maryland Delegation Muscling for FBI Headquarters

A District of Columbia site didn’t make the shortlist for the FBI’s new headquarters released Tuesday by the General Services Administration. But to the thrill of Maryland’s congressional delegation, possible locations included the Greenbelt Metro Station and Landover Mall, both located in Prince George’s County.

Roll Call After Dark Book of the Week: 'The Final Days' by Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein

If “All The President’s Men” is about the chase, the follow-up by Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein, “The Final Days” is about the long, slow, bleeding out and death of the hunted. A denser, complicated, multi-layered, sad descent into resignation, both literal and figurative, the recounting of the last few months of President Richard M. Nixon’s presidency is a master telling of the slog of a White House staff who knows that time is running out.

Hani Garabyare's Journey From Somalia to the Senate

Hani Garabyare's Journey From Somalia to the Senate

When Hani Garabyare was a little girl, she prayed that she would be an American.

How to Write — and Receive — Mean Emails

Before the age of emails, people would leave nasty voice mails. It was a quick and efficient way to get your message across without having the face-to-face encounter that so many people want to avoid. But now there is email. Don’t like the tone someone takes with a constituent? Put it in email. Saw some errors on that last press release? Fire off an email. Did something go through without your approval? Write that in an email and send it right off.

Protest Raises Questions About Contract Workers of Legislative Branch

Labor issues came to Capitol Hill Tuesday, as federal contractors protested wages at Union Station and members of Congress used the opportunity to discuss workers’ rights among contractors and employees in the legislative branch.

Judge Stays D.C. Handgun Ruling for 90 Days

A federal judge on Tuesday put a hold on the ruling that overturned the District’s ban on carrying handguns in public, effectively giving D.C. police and law enforcement some space to figure out how to respond.

A Bloc of One

In his own time, Thomas Hart Benton was always a force to be reckoned with. But the Missouri Democrat who served 30 years in the Senate has not received the love or attention from historians that some of his more celebrated contemporaries enjoy.

Ryan Shucard Case Highlights Gun Law Discrepancies

Staff in Rep. Tom Marino’s office are convinced that Ryan Shucard, the press secretary that arrived at the Cannon House Office building toting a 9 mm handgun on Friday morning, was not planning to harm anyone with the gun.

D.C. Activists Enlist Andy Harris for Help With Porta-Potty

Activists from the District of Columbia crowded the hallway outside Rep. Andy Harris’ office on Thursday to lobby the Maryland Republican for help with local issues.

Dads on Capitol Hill: House Paternity Leave Varies Widely

Dads on Capitol Hill: House Paternity Leave Varies Widely

Matt Dennis wasn’t used to making reporters wait for a response. But when he was on paternity leave, his newborn son Jonah took priority over his boss, Democratic Rep. Nita M. Lowey of New York, so he put the BlackBerry aside.

For Statehood Activists, Obama's Actions Leave 'a Lot to Be Desired'

When voters elected Barack Obama in 2008, District of Columbia residents were thrilled to see a senator who backed a bill to give them voting rights in Congress head to the White House.

D.C. Residents Keep Facing Questions About Identification

A District of Columbia driver’s license should be enough identification to allow citizens to board a plane or enter a federal building, according to federal and local officials. So how come there’s so much confusion on the topic?

Art and Soul Toques Revere Shared Past, Anticipate Promising Futures

Art and Soul Toques Revere Shared Past, Anticipate Promising Futures

There’ll be a changing of the culinary guard in the Art and Soul kitchen at the end of this month, as Wes Morton hands control of the thriving Hillside dining operation to incoming Executive Chef Doug Alexander.

Segs in the City: They're Just Not That Into You

In a city such as D.C., with its infinite possibilities, had Segway tours become too much to endure? The answer is no, thanks to Segs in the City and their friends forever at the Institute of Justice, who sued to get rid of that D.C. rite of passage.

D.C. Pot Decriminalization Takes Effect, but Don't Bring Bud to Capitol Hill

Despite House Republican attempts to derail decriminalization, marijuana possession becomes a civil offense in the District of Columbia on Thursday, punishable by a $25 fine.

Man Bites Dogs -- A Case for D.C.'s Meats

Man Bites Dogs -- A Case for D.C.'s Meats

The sea of flag-waving tourists flooding the National Mall has (thankfully) receded. And the cacophony of thunderous pyrotechnics that traumatized skittish pets for miles around is fast becoming a distant memory.

The Quick Guide to 'Best Intern Ever: How to Ace Your Capitol Hill Internship'

Interns are busy. Most everyone in D.C. is busy. But as longtime Hill Navigator readers may have noticed, this week we launched the first Roll Call e-book: Best Intern Ever: How to Ace Your Capitol Hill Internship.

Don Young Said to Have Barged Through Barriers Blocking Asbestos Spill

Asbestos abatement continues following the July 10 outbreak that briefly closed the House side of the Capitol, and one congressman might be in hot water for his conduct that morning.

Priorities, Priorities: In D.C., Yoga More Expensive, Beer More Available

How’s this for a city motto: Washington, D.C., where the yoga’s expensive and the beer is easy!

Health Insurance for Congress and Staff: It's Complicated

As members of Congress and their staffs head into their second year of enrollment in D.C.’s health exchange, they’ll decide among plans that range from a double-digit increase to a double-digit percent decrease in premiums, even as providers go in different directions that will result in fewer overall plans to choose from.

Waiting for the 'SuperJob'

Like your job? But what if there is something out there even better for you — fancier title, higher tax bracket, maybe even a MacBook Air? How do you decide when to leave a good job for something that could be better? Hill Navigator discusses.

Adventures in Babysitting: Getting Into the House Day Care

Adventures in Babysitting: Getting Into the House Day Care

Thinking about starting a family? Interested in having kids, but not sure when?

Bloopers: Roll Call Congressional Baseball Game

The Roll Call Congressional Baseball Game can be a real challenge for a political photographer like me. Although I used to be a really good sports photographer — having covered every level of competition from tee ball to the Olympics in my days working for daily newspapers — one gets a bit rusty shooting slow-moving lawmakers around the Capitol full time.

Beginner’s Guide to Political Reporting Jobs

So you want to be a reporter? You want to join the profession listed as among the worst jobs of 2014, at a time when publishing industry is going through a “period of turmoil”?

Sid Yudain, Roll Call Founder, Laid to Rest

Sid Yudain, Roll Call Founder, Laid to Rest

ARLINGTON NATIONAL CEMETERY, Va. — Before he was Sid Yudain, founder and publisher of Roll Call newspaper, he was TEC 5 Sidney Lawrence Yudain, Detached Enlisted Men’s List, United States Army. The World War II veteran who died on Oct. 20, 2013, was laid to rest at the military’s hallowed ground here on Friday, interred at Columbarium 9, Section N26, Row 3, Niche 2.

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