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Vote Now: Where Should Roll Call Travel for the Midterm Elections?

The Maine Attraction: Getting a Taste of the Chellie Pingree Experience

The Maine Attraction: Getting a Taste of the Chellie Pingree Experience
Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call

ROCKLAND, Maine — Once aboard the boat that will speed us to North Haven, a Connecticut man opens up about his affinity for the Pine Tree State.

Critics of Washington Team Name Target NFL Nonprofit Status

The NFL, facing multiple public relations fiascos regarding domestic violence issues, can expect some more heat coming its way from Congress as Native American groups and members from both chambers are promising a multipronged attack to pressure Washington Redskins owner Dan Snyder to change his team’s name.

Bigger and Better Things: Staffers Who Run for Office

Think being a congressional staffer can lead to bigger and better things? What about public office? You’re in good company: 75 of the current House and Senate members previously served as congressional staff, according to CQ Roll Call Member Information and Research. Hill Navigator discusses what aspects of the job may serve you well.

Critics Reject Gehry's Eisenhower Memorial Compromise, Optimistic About Change

After 15 years of planning a memorial to President Dwight D. Eisenhower, the design might move forward without architect Frank Gehry’s name attached to it.

Navy Yard Memorial Event Marks Anniversary of Tragedy

On the one-year anniversary of the tragic Navy Yard shooting in Southeast Washington, House Minority Whip Steny H. Hoyer, is inviting the Capitol Hill community and others to an evening ceremony honoring victims and survivors.

All in a 'Last Days' Work for Rory Kennedy

“My brother Chris says I make two kinds of films: depressing and really depressing. So, that may be my range,” Rory Kennedy says, laughing a little bit. “I don’t really see it that way. . . . A lot of my films, and I would throw this one there, are about people overcoming great odds.”

D.C. Statehood Hearing Explores Other Options

Washington, D.C. residents crowded into a hearing room in the Dirksen Senate Office Building Monday to witness the first hearing on D.C. statehood in two decades, though enacting statehood in the 113th Congress is not likely anytime soon.

Ken Burns Gets Personal With 'The Roosevelts'

“No other family has touched as many Americans as the Roosevelts,” documentary filmmaker Ken Burns said at a Monday National Press Club lunch about his new film, “The Roosevelts.” The three share a “complicated, Russian-novel of a story,” that has never been shared as one multifaceted narrative.

Capitol Hill Employees Concerned About July 10 Asbestos Exposure

The asbestos emergency that temporarily closed the House side of the Capitol was a scary ordeal for Architect of the Capitol and Capitol Police employees working the overnight shift.

A Hard Rock Day's Night

If there is an epicenter of the Washington Tourist-Industrial Complex, it may very well be the Hard Rock Cafe in Penn Quarter.

Beth Plemmons, the Capitol Visitor Center's Guide to Southern Hospitality

North Carolina native Beth Plemmons, CEO of visitor services at the Capitol Visitor Center, is a pro at Southern hospitality.

Capitol Tour Guides Say They've Lost the Right to Drink Water

Capitol Tour Guides Say They've Lost the Right to Drink Water

“No food, no drinks,” instructed Capitol Police officers posted outside the doors of the Capitol Visitor Center as tourists approached the complex on a recent muggy day.

D.C. Throws Its Hat in 2024 Summer Olympics Ring

Why should Washington, D.C., host the 2024 Summer Olympics?

Former Hill Aide, Assistant U.S. Attorney to Lead MLB Investigations Unit

Bryan Seeley, a former assistant U.S. attorney in D.C., joined a different team Thursday. Seeley will now lead Major League Baseball’s Department of Investigations as MLB’s vice president of investigations and deputy general counsel.

Getting a D.C. Job: Being Here Makes a Difference

Looking to make a switch from law firm life? Maybe you’d like to be more of an Erin Brockovich and less of an Ally McBeal. But how does time at a law firm — especially one outside of D.C. — affect your Capitol Hill job search? Hill Navigator discusses.

Fattah Aide's Corruption Case Shakes Up Bowser Campaign

The federal investigation into the finances of Rep. Chaka Fattah, D-Pa., has hit close to home in District politics, costing a consultant for Muriel Bowser’s mayoral campaign his job.

Iowa: The Fair of Entourages

Iowa: The Fair of Entourages

I attended the Iowa State Fair last week with Roll Call Politics Reporter Alexis Levinson to cover the Senate race to replace retiring Sen. Tom Harkin, D-Iowa. The candidates running for the seat are Democratic Rep. Bruce Braley and Republican state Senator Joni Ernst. I’ve have enjoyed taking photos of politicians at the fair in the past, but it proved tricky this time with the volume of people following them.

Portraits of Committee Chairmen: They're Up the Wall

A House chairman usually ends up hanging around the committee room years after he or she retires.

Arms and the Man: Shakespeare Edition

William Shakespeare was celebrated during his lifetime as a leading poet and dramatist. But by 1596, the Bard sought something more to cement his standing among the Elizabethan upper crust: A family coat of arms.

Capitol Hill Gets First Openly Transgender Staffer of 113th Congress

Capitol Hill is getting its sole transgender staff member, the Gay & Lesbian Victory Institute announced Thursday.

How to Write — and Receive — Mean Emails

Before the age of emails, people would leave nasty voice mails. It was a quick and efficient way to get your message across without having the face-to-face encounter that so many people want to avoid. But now there is email. Don’t like the tone someone takes with a constituent? Put it in email. Saw some errors on that last press release? Fire off an email. Did something go through without your approval? Write that in an email and send it right off.

Protest Raises Questions About Contract Workers of Legislative Branch

Labor issues came to Capitol Hill Tuesday, as federal contractors protested wages at Union Station and members of Congress used the opportunity to discuss workers’ rights among contractors and employees in the legislative branch.

Ryan Shucard Case Highlights Gun Law Discrepancies

Staff in Rep. Tom Marino’s office are convinced that Ryan Shucard, the press secretary that arrived at the Cannon House Office building toting a 9 mm handgun on Friday morning, was not planning to harm anyone with the gun.

Dads on Capitol Hill: House Paternity Leave Varies Widely

Dads on Capitol Hill: House Paternity Leave Varies Widely

Matt Dennis wasn’t used to making reporters wait for a response. But when he was on paternity leave, his newborn son Jonah took priority over his boss, Democratic Rep. Nita M. Lowey of New York, so he put the BlackBerry aside.

D.C. Residents Keep Facing Questions About Identification

A District of Columbia driver’s license should be enough identification to allow citizens to board a plane or enter a federal building, according to federal and local officials. So how come there’s so much confusion on the topic?

Segs in the City: They're Just Not That Into You

In a city such as D.C., with its infinite possibilities, had Segway tours become too much to endure? The answer is no, thanks to Segs in the City and their friends forever at the Institute of Justice, who sued to get rid of that D.C. rite of passage.

D.C. Pot Decriminalization Takes Effect, but Don't Bring Bud to Capitol Hill

Despite House Republican attempts to derail decriminalization, marijuana possession becomes a civil offense in the District of Columbia on Thursday, punishable by a $25 fine.

The Quick Guide to 'Best Intern Ever: How to Ace Your Capitol Hill Internship'

Interns are busy. Most everyone in D.C. is busy. But as longtime Hill Navigator readers may have noticed, this week we launched the first Roll Call e-book: Best Intern Ever: How to Ace Your Capitol Hill Internship.

Don Young Said to Have Barged Through Barriers Blocking Asbestos Spill

Asbestos abatement continues following the July 10 outbreak that briefly closed the House side of the Capitol, and one congressman might be in hot water for his conduct that morning.

Health Insurance for Congress and Staff: It's Complicated

As members of Congress and their staffs head into their second year of enrollment in D.C.’s health exchange, they’ll decide among plans that range from a double-digit increase to a double-digit percent decrease in premiums, even as providers go in different directions that will result in fewer overall plans to choose from.

Adventures in Babysitting: Getting Into the House Day Care

Adventures in Babysitting: Getting Into the House Day Care

Thinking about starting a family? Interested in having kids, but not sure when?

Bloopers: Roll Call Congressional Baseball Game

The Roll Call Congressional Baseball Game can be a real challenge for a political photographer like me. Although I used to be a really good sports photographer — having covered every level of competition from tee ball to the Olympics in my days working for daily newspapers — one gets a bit rusty shooting slow-moving lawmakers around the Capitol full time.

Beginner’s Guide to Political Reporting Jobs

So you want to be a reporter? You want to join the profession listed as among the worst jobs of 2014, at a time when publishing industry is going through a “period of turmoil”?

Sid Yudain, Roll Call Founder, Laid to Rest

Sid Yudain, Roll Call Founder, Laid to Rest

ARLINGTON NATIONAL CEMETERY, Va. — Before he was Sid Yudain, founder and publisher of Roll Call newspaper, he was TEC 5 Sidney Lawrence Yudain, Detached Enlisted Men’s List, United States Army. The World War II veteran who died on Oct. 20, 2013, was laid to rest at the military’s hallowed ground here on Friday, interred at Columbarium 9, Section N26, Row 3, Niche 2.

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