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Netanyahu Speech Draws Protests, Increased Security

Netanyahu Speech Draws Protests, Increased Security

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s controversial address to a joint meeting of Congress Tuesday drew protests and ramped up security all over Capitol Hill.

Issa Rae: A Relatable Star in the Making

Devoted fans gathered at the historic Sixth & I Historic Synagogue on a cold night recently to hear author — and YouTube sensation — Jo-Issa “Issa Rae” Diop discuss her new book, “The Misadventures of Awkward Black Girl.”

For Some D.C. Advocates, Mikulski Retirement Is 'a Special Blow'

For Some D.C. Advocates, Mikulski Retirement Is 'a Special Blow'

Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski’s retirement announcement Monday sparked national reflections about her legacy and speculations about potential successors, but in the District of Columbia, officials and activists focused on the Maryland Democrat’s advocacy for D.C. and the nation’s capital region.

Hill East Redevelopment Moves Forward With Land Agreement

Hill East Redevelopment Moves Forward With Land Agreement

District of Columbia Mayor Muriel Bowser signed an agreement Monday launching the redevelopment of the Hill East District, with construction expected to begin next year on a project that includes additional apartments, a public village square and green space.

Elizabeth Roskam Readies Bibi’s Dome

Administration officials have made it very clear that Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu will not get to press the flesh with President Barack Obama before or after Tuesday’s politically charged appearance on Capitol Hill. But, thanks to congressional spouse Elizabeth Roskam, Bibi won’t be going home completely empty-handed.

The 'Real Congresswoman From Selma' Has Her Say

The 'Real Congresswoman From Selma' Has Her Say

MONTGOMERY, Ala. — Rep. Terri A. Sewell has her constituents in Alabama. Then she has “the” constituent.


Judge Dismisses Obamacare Lawsuit Targeting Congressional Health Care

A D.C. Superior Court judge dismissed on Wednesday a lawsuit challenging congressional health care enrollment in the D.C. small business exchange, ruling that federal regulations allow members of Congress and their staffs to enroll in the exchange.

Bibi Makes Waves

Parting the waters just isn’t the miracle it used to be, especially in an already bitterly divided Capitol. And all these years after President Obama declared there was no Red Sea, and there was no Blue Sea, but there was one United American Sea, we’re still waiting for the world historical figure who can walk on water across it.

Code Pink Feeling Stifled by Capitol Police Crackdown

Forced into handcuffs before and after congressional hearings over the past two days, protesters organizing with Code Pink are fuming about the beefed-up presence of Capitol Police when contentious, high-profile officials testify on Capitol Hill.

D.C. Stands Up to Congress on Marijuana Legalization

D.C. Stands Up to Congress on Marijuana Legalization

As of 12:01 a.m. Thursday, the District of Columbia will legalize marijuana, despite warnings from two congressional Republicans that doing so would break the law and could lead to possible prison time for D.C. officials.

Kerry Bentivolio Files for Bankruptcy

Fewer than two months after the Santa Claus impersonator and reindeer farmer who represented southeast Michigan for one term left Congress, the tea party-inspired Republican has filed for bankruptcy.

The Selma to Montgomery Bicycle Ride: Civil Rights and Bamas

LOWNDES COUNTY, Ala. — A partial list of things not present at the 1965 Selma to Montgomery march: A drone mini-copter, Lynyrd Skynyrd’s “Sweet Home Alabama,” Viola Liuzzo’s roadside memorial.

Private Plane Rides Have Bumpy Congressional History

Among the serious accusations of improper spending leveled at Rep. Aaron Schock since The Washington Post shined a spotlight on his “Downton Abbey”-themed office are at least a dozen flights aboard his political donors’ private planes.

Vote for Your Favorite Whip Now Capitol Quip!

The four finalists for this week’s caption contest are ready for your votes.

Touring Tastemaker Wants D.C. in His Regular Rotation

While dazzling patrons with mind-blowingly fresh ingredients is certainly part of his master plan, dining impresario Michael Stember is currently most obsessed with making his traveling food show self-sustainable.

Officer Morale a Hot Topic for Capitol Police at Appropriations Hearing

Low morale among Capitol Police was a hot topic for law enforcement officials on Wednesday during a series of panels convened by the House lawmakers who set the department’s budget.

Maureen McDonnell Offers Cautionary Tale for Congressional Spouses

Virginia’s former first lady, Maureen McDonnell, is heading to prison for a year and a day after she was found guilty of trading favors in return for loans, vacations and gifts. Her husband, former Gov. Bob McDonnell, has also been sentenced and is appealing the ruling. A onetime GOP star, his career is likely over.

Job Switching: Better to Jump Around or Sit Still?

You can’t go a week without getting one of those “Moving on. . .” emails from staffers detailing their latest job switch, usually something more glamorous than their last position (which they will bemoan leaving behind, along with an outstanding boss and set of co-workers, as any good staffer should). But how many emails can you read without questioning whether YOU should make the job hop as well? Hill Navigator discusses.

Capitol Police Chief's Leadership Questioned

Capitol Police Chief's Leadership Questioned

The State of the Union night car chase that ended without arrest added new strains to already tense relationships inside the law enforcement community on Capitol Hill.

Court Gives Bowser Budget Autonomy Deadline

The District of Columbia Circuit Court of Appeals has paused an ongoing case over budget autonomy, giving Mayor Muriel Bowser until March 16 to solidify her position in the case, public court documents filed Friday show.

A Scientist Grows Art in NoMa at Gallery NK

Tucked away amid the row houses of NoMA is a once run down warehouse transformed into a clean modern contemporary art gallery. The quaint studio, Gallery NK, is the creation of Turkish born artist Nihal Kececi.

Shadow Senator Implies Presidential Bid After Iowa Trip

When senators head to Iowa, speculation about presidential aspirations heats up — a fact one “shadow” senator who traveled to Des Moines over the weekend kept in mind.

Fate of D.C. Budget Autonomy Case Uncertain

Fate of D.C. Budget Autonomy Case Uncertain

The ongoing case over a law granting the District of Columbia control over its local budget could be stalled as the mayor solidifies her position, raising questions about the future of the case.

Can I Skip the Intern Route?

Interning may be the common way to get a job on Capitol Hill, but what if you’ve got the political experience and are ready to work full time? Do you really need the Capitol Hill internship? Hill Navigator discusses:

Staffers Get to Know 'the Real Washington'

Hundreds of staffers crowded into the Cannon caucus room Wednesday afternoon to learn about what the District of Columbia has to offer outside of Capitol Hill — and to fill their “D.C. Stuff” bags with some capital swag.

No New Confidence in Metro After Hearing on L'Enfant Incident

No New Confidence in Metro After Hearing on L'Enfant Incident

Despite intense scrutiny from lawmakers and federal safety regulators in the month since the deadly Metro incident that sent dozens of riders to the hospital and resulted in one death, local transit and public safety officials haven’t convinced passengers that the Jan. 12 emergency couldn’t happen again.

Allow Capitol Ink to Color Politics for You

Spotted: Roll Call’s newest blog, Capitol Ink, a multimedia platform for R.J. Matson’s cartoons, as well as his animated perspective on the news and issues of the day.

Fate of D.C. Budget Autonomy Case Uncertain

The ongoing case over a law granting the District of Columbia control over its local budget could be stalled as the mayor solidifies her position, raising questions about the future of the case.

Washington Jewish Film Festival Casts Wide Net

The Washington Jewish Film Festival gets underway on Thursday, an 11-day showcase for the global tapestry of Jewish life. What you’ll see — a range of films that includes repertory classics like Francois Truffaut’s “The Last Metro” and Louis Malle’s “Au Revoir Les Enfants” to contemporary Israeli selections such as Nissun Dayan’s “The Dove Flyer” — is by turns dark, funny, religious, secular, musical and everything else under the sun.

Bowser Talks Metro and Marijuana on Capitol Hill

Two weeks after meeting with Speaker John A. Boehner, District of Columbia Mayor Muriel Bowser was back on Capitol Hill Thursday to meet with Democratic leaders and others to discuss D.C. issues, including Metro funding, marijuana legalization and autonomy.

Senate Committee Cuts a Reversal of Trend

As the House Administration Committee deliberated committee funding over the past week, its counterpart across the Dome, the Senate Rules and Administration Committee adopted its funding resolution in a two-minute markup Thursday morning.

Immigration Protests in Capitol Offices Strain Police

Tears welling in her eyes, Maria Sotomayor explained to a staffer in the office of Rep. Lou Barletta how the Pennsylvania Republican put her family at risk by attempting to dismantle President Barack Obama’s executive orders on immigration.

House Ethics Committee Briefly Opens Its Doors

The public got a rare glimpse inside the House Ethics Committee on Thursday morning, when the secretive panel convened to determine its rules and oversight plan for the 114th Congress.

Sonoma, Beuchert’s Team Up to Trick Out Stanton & Greene

Artisan spirits and historic accents make up the foundation of the collaborative hospitality project slowly taking shape behind the soon-to-be reopened doors at 319 Pennsylvania Ave. SE.

Black GOP Lawmakers Stress Self-Reliance at Trailblazer Luncheon

The Republican National Committee on Wednesday hosted its 3rd Annual Republican Trailblazer Awards Luncheon at the historic Howard Theatre — a venue graced by legendary black luminaries and performers such as Booker T. Washington, Duke Ellington and Drake.

Barry Goldwater Statue Unveiled in the Capitol

The bronze likeness of the late Sen. Barry Goldwater, R-Ariz., was unveiled in Statuary Hall Wednesday, becoming the latest addition to the 50-state statue collection in the Capitol.

Phone Scammers Target Congressional Offices

Security officials are warning Capitol Hill employees to be alert for telephone scams targeting congressional offices, a reminder that Internet calling technology makes phone calls as big a threat to Congress as cyberattacks.

Hearing or Discussion? D.C. Council Event Underscores Marijuana Dispute With Congress

Hearing or Discussion? D.C. Council Event Underscores Marijuana Dispute With Congress

Though some legal confusion surrounds the fate of the District of Columbia’s marijuana legalization initiative, the D.C. Council defied Congress Monday by discussing a system to regulate the tax and sale of marijuana.

Unloved and Underpaid in a Home-State Office

It’s no secret Capitol Hill staffers are underpaid compared to their private-sector counterparts. But what if you’re underpaid compared to the rest of Capitol Hill? When is it time to find work in another office? Hill Navigator discusses.

The Era of Cold Calling Has Ended

There’s something to be said for gumption: the go-get-‘em attitude that shrinks the power distance between junior staffers and the far senior authorities. But how does one bridge that divide and advance a career in the process? Hill Navigator discusses.

Capitol Police Diversity Officer Pleads Guilty to Embezzlement

Nearly 10 months after she was escorted from Capitol Police headquarters, the civilian employee who headed the department’s Office of Diversity pleaded guilty to embezzling public money during her previous employment at Immigration and Customs Enforcement.

Former Rep. Wes Cooley, Lightning Rod From Oregon, Dead at 82

Former Rep. Wes Cooley, R-Ore., who served one term in Congress, died Wednesday at the age of 82.

When Interior Decorating Questions Get Weird

When Interior Decorating Questions Get Weird

Some members of Congress go their whole lives without being asked about their office decorations. Others have it foisted upon them.

Vitter Requests Obamacare Documents From D.C., House and Senate

Sen. David Vitter, R-La., is continuing his legal battle over congressional members’ and staffers’ health care enrollment in the D.C. small business exchange by demanding answers to questions raised by an ongoing Obamacare lawsuit.

On Capitol Hill, Ad Hoc Paid Leave Policies Flourish

Much has been written about Capitol Hill staff and the wide disparities in paid maternity and paternity leave policies. Offices with longstanding histories of generous leave policies are quick to speak up, but many offices dodge the question, either citing privacy concerns or giving the classic silent treatment by ignoring reporters’ questions.

Congress' Top Travelers Say Globetrotting on Private Dime Essential

Congress' Top Travelers Say Globetrotting on Private Dime Essential

As one of the top travelers in Congress, Colorado Democrat Diana DeGette likes to give this advice to incoming House freshmen: “Pick one or two countries and really get deeply involved in the politics and culture.”

Jim Moran Doesn't Miss Congress

For the record, ex-Rep. James P. Moran doesn’t miss Congress. At least, “not yet.”

A Mild Journey to the Heart of Pentagon City (Video)

“You can’t be subtle in this town.”

Late Congressman's Wife on Quest for Missing Cash, Memorabilia

Late Congressman's Wife on Quest for Missing Cash, Memorabilia

SEMINOLE, Fla. — What happens when a member of Congress dies in office? There is no standard set procedure and the internecine melee that followed the death of Rep. C.W. Bill Young, perhaps best illustrated by the exhaustive search for a handful of pictures and one Pentagon-approved memento, has ruined decades-old friendships and frayed family bonds seemingly beyond repair.

Chilling Out Is What It’s All About at the Dolcezza Factory

The little, local gelato maker that could has come a long way from solely dishing scoops of handmade refreshment to college kids and thrusting samples in the faces of those perusing different stalls at the farmers market. The decade-long trek to the top of the frozen dessert heap in D.C. has culminated in the development of the bright, welcoming Dolcezza Factory at 550 Penn St. NE that took up residence in the shadow of next-gen shopping hub Union Market last winter.

McConnell's Sergeant-at-Arms Team's Time Together Goes Way Back (Audio)

The two men at the helm of the Senate Sergeant-at-Arms office first crossed paths nearly two decades ago as staffers on the chamber’s Appropriations Committee.

The Two-Second Shot

The Two-Second Shot

Many times on the Hill, a photographer has to guess which direction someone will go, how many photographers will be there already, what the light situation will be and numerous other scenarios.

Chaffetz Allowed to Move Oversight Chairmen Portraits

The walls of the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee room were bare Thursday afternoon, with a handful of tiny holes where portraits of past committee chairmen once hung.

How to Ace the Business Lunch

Forget the sunrise diner special, or candlelit, white tablecloth dinners. If you’re going to eat one meal properly in Washington, D.C., it should be the power lunch. The power lunch is the ideal midday break, a mini-vacation to the day, a chance to hear the lobby pitches while nibbling on veal tagliatelle or steak frites, perhaps eyeing the room to see nearby diners who would warrant a quick tip to Heard on the Hill.

'The Great War' Memorial's Great Journey

Achieving approval to establish a national World War I memorial in the District of Columbia took longer than the war itself.

The Best News Sources for Staffers to Read

Are you reading this while at your desk? On your smartphone on the Metro? Maybe you get Hill Navigator delivered directly to your inbox. But how do you know if you’re reading the best news sources to do your job effectively? Hill Navigator discusses.

GOP Moves to Shore Up Rules for Congressional Caucus Employees

After revelations that may have hurt the Republican brand, House Majority Whip Steve Scalise is pushing through a rule change that could strengthen the largest member organizations, such as the Republican Study Committee, in the 114th Congress.

House Ethics: An Isolating Gavel to Hold

Come January, Rep. K. Michael Conaway won’t have to worry about scaring away his friends on Capitol Hill.

Hiking Arizona's Gabe Zimmerman Trail

DAVIDSON CANYON, Ariz. — The bike rack at the Gabe Zimmerman Trailhead here is a twisted oxidized metal coil molded to look like a rattlesnake. It’s a small bit of whimsy amid a majestic part of the 800-plus-mile Arizona Trail dedicated to the victims of a dark chapter in the Grand Canyon State’s history.

How to Land a Job Working for a New Member of Congress

The congressional job search goes into overdrive every two years, as each election brings new members of Congress looking to hire staff. Working for a new member can be so much fun — you get all the optimism, good will and eagerness of Congress without the jaded, pessimistic edge (at least not yet). But how do you land one of those coveted spots? Hill Navigator discusses.

The Have-Nots: 132 Members Show Negative Net Worth

While the wealth of Congress surged $150 million last year and at least a third of federal lawmakers are millionaires, there’s a sizable group of have-nots in Congress too.

Secrets From Capitol Hill's Back Rooms: How to Get Hired on the Hill

Want that Capitol Hill job? Doesn’t “congressional staffer” have such a nice ring to it?

The Maine Attraction: Getting a Taste of the Chellie Pingree Experience

ROCKLAND, Maine — Once aboard the boat that will speed us to North Haven, a Connecticut man opens up about his affinity for the Pine Tree State.

Portraits of Committee Chairmen: They're Up the Wall

A House chairman usually ends up hanging around the committee room years after he or she retires.

Dads on Capitol Hill: House Paternity Leave Varies Widely

Matt Dennis wasn’t used to making reporters wait for a response. But when he was on paternity leave, his newborn son Jonah took priority over his boss, Democratic Rep. Nita M. Lowey of New York, so he put the BlackBerry aside.

Segs in the City: They're Just Not That Into You

In a city such as D.C., with its infinite possibilities, had Segway tours become too much to endure? The answer is no, thanks to Segs in the City and their friends forever at the Institute of Justice, who sued to get rid of that D.C. rite of passage.

The Quick Guide to 'Best Intern Ever: How to Ace Your Capitol Hill Internship'

Interns are busy. Most everyone in D.C. is busy. But as longtime Hill Navigator readers may have noticed, this week we launched the first Roll Call e-book: Best Intern Ever: How to Ace Your Capitol Hill Internship.

Adventures in Babysitting: Getting Into the House Day Care

Adventures in Babysitting: Getting Into the House Day Care

Thinking about starting a family? Interested in having kids, but not sure when?

Beginner’s Guide to Political Reporting Jobs

So you want to be a reporter? You want to join the profession listed as among the worst jobs of 2014, at a time when publishing industry is going through a “period of turmoil”?

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