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Do the Capitol's Sergeants-at-Arms Carry Guns? (Video)

Do the Capitol's Sergeants-at-Arms Carry Guns? (Video)
CQ Roll Call File Photo

Members of the Canadian Parliament are praising as a hero House of Commons Sergeant-at-Arms Kevin Vickers, a former police superintendent, for his reported role in taking down the gunman who entered the building. Capitol Hill may be wondering if its own sergeants-at-arms usually pack heat.

The Have-Nots: 132 Members Show Negative Net Worth

While the wealth of Congress surged $150 million last year and at least a third of federal lawmakers are millionaires, there’s a sizable group of have-nots in Congress too.

WMATA: Current Procedures 'Sufficient' for Countering Ebola

In the wake of concerns about the Ebola virus in the U.S., leaders in the D.C. transit system met last week to review protocols for preventing the spread of infectious diseases on the metro system and determined current procedures were sufficient to counter the virus.

D.C. Board of Elections: 'Well, We Messed Up.'

One week after a lighthearted dismissal of the error, the District of Columbia’s election board issued a formal apology to voters for printing an upside down image of the D.C. flag on its official voter guide.

The Hill Staffer Campaign Trail Survival Guide

It’s October! Which brings postseason baseball (sorry, Nationals) and the return of football. It’s the end of iced coffee and the overly sweet arrival of latte concoctions like pumpkin spice and cinnamon dolce.

These Members of Congress Report Having No Assets

In a Congress packed with millionaires and near-millionaires, six lawmakers stand out on the other end of the spectrum — they didn’t report a single asset on their financial disclosure forms.

Getting the Job Done in Media Scrums

Getting the Job Done in Media Scrums

There are many competitive photographers in D.C. I’ve learned from guys such as Stephen Crowley of The New York Times, Win McNamee of Getty and The Associated Press’ J. Scott Applewhite since I came here as an intern with six months of experience at my college newspaper. They don’t need to be the closest or most aggressive. They put some elements together, capture a moment, or catch a piece of light that will tie a picture together. Colleagues I respect will always try to be aware of where the other shooters are in a crowd and flash a “You OK?” look when they are close to being in your frame. I try to operate this way, too, but sometimes it can be difficult on the road.

Hastert Recalls Sept. 11, 2001 Evacuation of the Capitol

The smoke he saw drifting across the National Mall on Sept. 11, 2001, while sitting behind his desk at the Capitol left a lasting impression on former Speaker J. Dennis Hastert.

What To Do in D.C.'s In-Between Times

Well, we all know what we’ll be doing in two weeks: sweating out election returns. And next week is Halloween. But what about this week — particularly if you’re not on the trail or otherwise — should you find yourself in Washington, D.C.?

Late-Night Terrorism Drills Test D.C. Officials

Police in the District of Columbia responded to a staged suicide bombing shortly after 9 p.m. Sunday, on the former Walter Reed Army Medical Center site in Northwest Washington.

National Christmas Tree Lighting Lottery Starts

Decorations might stay off the shelves until after Halloween, but if you want to see the Dec. 4 National Christmas Tree lighting on the White House Ellipse this year, you better get your head wrapped around the holidays at least for this week.

Could Nov. 4 Results Render D.C.'s Budget Autonomy Case Moot?

More than 40 years after President Richard M. Nixon signed the Home Rule Act, legal experts in the District of Columbia are fighting about what the feds intended.

Grazing Wars: Grass March Cowboys Ride to Capitol Hill

A Prius driver pulled up next to the horse trailer parked on Maryland Avenue midday Thursday, a block southwest of the Capitol, and asked Nevada ranch hand George Martin what issue brought him to Washington.

Official Confirms 12 Ebola Investigations in D.C.

Official Confirms 12 Ebola Investigations in D.C.

At least a dozen Ebola cases have been investigated in the District of Columbia, the director of the city’s Department of Health disclosed Thursday, but no one has tested positive for the disease.

Oops: Upside-Down Flag Mars D.C. Voter Guide

District of Columbia residents might be confused to see an upside-down D.C. flag on the cover of the official voter guide being shipped out in advance of the Nov. 4 elections.

Watchdogs Want Stronger Congressional Ethics Office

Despite its small staff of nine and a slim operating budget of about $1.5 million, the Office of Congressional Ethics has managed to achieve tangible victories in the House, according to sources once skeptical the agency could accomplish its mission.

With Malice Toward Some: 'Lincoln and the Power of the Press' Elucidates Symbiotic Relationship Between Politicians and Journalists

The haze of nostalgia often blinds people to the problems of the past. This is especially true in politics and journalism, where current practitioners love to wax rhapsodic about how great things were in the good old days, when everybody got along and drank whiskey with each other and were regular old pals.

Harvard Welcomes New Members With 4-Day Orientation

It isn’t easy for new members of Congress to sit down and talk openly with lawmakers from the other side of the aisle — cameras are ever-present, reporters are never far away and there isn’t exactly a lot of love between the two major parties.

'Special Treatment' for Congress Inspires Another Obamacare Lawsuit

This time it’s not a lawmaker, but an outside conservative group that plans to file suit over alleged “special treatment” for members of Congress enrolled in gold-level coverage plans through DC Health Link.

Capitol Police Replenish Their Ranks After Hiring Freeze

Capitol Police Replenish Their Ranks After Hiring Freeze

CHELTENHAM, Md. — Forearms pressed into the black asphalt, the Capitol Police’s 179th class of recruits shook and dripped with sweat in their third minute of planks. It was near 10 a.m. on an 80-degree morning in mid-September, and since 7 a.m. they had been performing squats, crunches and a particularly grueling training drill requiring them to drag a 165 pound dummy 40 feet.

Spin is Overrated: Crisis Communications for Members of Congress

Ever wonder how “spin doctors” in the public affairs world really accomplish their feats? According to crisis communicator and former White House staffer Eric Dezenhall, promises of “spin” are overrated. His new book “Glass Jaw” (Hatchette Books, 2014) explores the “instant scandals” that can affect anyone and anything: from corporations to members of Congress to average joes.

Gray Signs D.C. Handgun Law to 'Cure Alleged Constitutional Flaws'

With little fanfare, Mayor Vincent Gray signed legislation Thursday evening legalizing the concealed carry of handguns in the District of Columbia in response to a lawsuit brought against the city by Second Amendment advocates.

Zimbabwe Lobbying Case Yields Another Conviction

A Chicago man who bragged to Zimbabwe President Robert Mugabe in 2008 about his close ties to then President-Elect Barack Obama was convicted Friday of violating federal law as he lobbied for relief of sanctions against the African nation.

Congress' Doctor: Ebola Precautions Are in Place

Congress' Doctor: Ebola Precautions Are in Place

With fear of an Ebola outbreak on the rise, the attending physician of Congress is assuring the congressional community that a carefully developed protocol is in place at the Capitol to handle a potential infectious disease outbreak.

Secrets From Capitol Hill's Back Rooms: How to Get Hired on the Hill

Want that Capitol Hill job? Doesn’t “congressional staffer” have such a nice ring to it?

Will Bowser Push Democrats on D.C. Statehood?

National Democrats parachuted into local District of Columbia politics this week to bolster D.C. Councilmember Muriel Bowser’s campaign to succeed Mayor Vincent Gray, but neither President Barack Obama nor Democratic National Committee Chairwoman Debbie Wasserman Schultz made any promises to use their political capital on behalf of residents’ longtime goal.

Behind the Photo: Mary Landrieu's Keg-Stand Assist

Behind the Photo: Mary Landrieu's Keg-Stand Assist

BATON ROUGE, La. — Soon after arriving in Louisiana to cover the Senate race, Roll Call Associate Politics Editor Kyle Trygstad and I found out Republican challenger Rep. Bill Cassidy and Sen. Mary L. Landrieu would be campaigning at the massive alcohol-infused ritual of Louisiana State University football tailgating.

Congress Playing Tough With the NFL (Video)

In 2009, Capitol Hill welcomed the Washington Redskins Marching Band and two cheerleaders for a pep rally on the West Front. It was a festive preparation for a Monday night NFL game against the Dallas Cowboys.

The Maine Attraction: Getting a Taste of the Chellie Pingree Experience

The Maine Attraction: Getting a Taste of the Chellie Pingree Experience

ROCKLAND, Maine — Once aboard the boat that will speed us to North Haven, a Connecticut man opens up about his affinity for the Pine Tree State.

A Hard Rock Day's Night

If there is an epicenter of the Washington Tourist-Industrial Complex, it may very well be the Hard Rock Cafe in Penn Quarter.

Beth Plemmons, the Capitol Visitor Center's Guide to Southern Hospitality

North Carolina native Beth Plemmons, CEO of visitor services at the Capitol Visitor Center, is a pro at Southern hospitality.

Getting a D.C. Job: Being Here Makes a Difference

Looking to make a switch from law firm life? Maybe you’d like to be more of an Erin Brockovich and less of an Ally McBeal. But how does time at a law firm — especially one outside of D.C. — affect your Capitol Hill job search? Hill Navigator discusses.

Portraits of Committee Chairmen: They're Up the Wall

A House chairman usually ends up hanging around the committee room years after he or she retires.

How to Write — and Receive — Mean Emails

Before the age of emails, people would leave nasty voice mails. It was a quick and efficient way to get your message across without having the face-to-face encounter that so many people want to avoid. But now there is email. Don’t like the tone someone takes with a constituent? Put it in email. Saw some errors on that last press release? Fire off an email. Did something go through without your approval? Write that in an email and send it right off.

Dads on Capitol Hill: House Paternity Leave Varies Widely

Dads on Capitol Hill: House Paternity Leave Varies Widely

Matt Dennis wasn’t used to making reporters wait for a response. But when he was on paternity leave, his newborn son Jonah took priority over his boss, Democratic Rep. Nita M. Lowey of New York, so he put the BlackBerry aside.

Segs in the City: They're Just Not That Into You

In a city such as D.C., with its infinite possibilities, had Segway tours become too much to endure? The answer is no, thanks to Segs in the City and their friends forever at the Institute of Justice, who sued to get rid of that D.C. rite of passage.

The Quick Guide to 'Best Intern Ever: How to Ace Your Capitol Hill Internship'

Interns are busy. Most everyone in D.C. is busy. But as longtime Hill Navigator readers may have noticed, this week we launched the first Roll Call e-book: Best Intern Ever: How to Ace Your Capitol Hill Internship.

Adventures in Babysitting: Getting Into the House Day Care

Adventures in Babysitting: Getting Into the House Day Care

Thinking about starting a family? Interested in having kids, but not sure when?

Beginner’s Guide to Political Reporting Jobs

So you want to be a reporter? You want to join the profession listed as among the worst jobs of 2014, at a time when publishing industry is going through a “period of turmoil”?

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