Heard on the Hill

Hoeven’s Father and Stepmother Die Two Days Apart
Senior Hoeven was politically active in North Dakota

Sen. John Hoeven's, R-N.D., father died Saturday at age 87. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

North Dakota Sen. John Hoeven’s father, John Hoeven, died Saturday, two days after the death of his wife Raziye, the senator’s stepmother.

Hoeven was a banker and community supporter and died at the age of 87, the Minot Daily News reported. The funeral will be on August 29 at the Cornerstone Presbyterian Church in Minot. 

Stefanik Marries IJR Marketer Manda
New York Republican and husband met at 2012 party

Rep. Elise Stefanik, R-N.Y., met her husband in 2012. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Rep. Elise Stefanik, R-N.Y., was married Saturday to Matthew Manda, communications and marketing director for the Media Group of America, which owns the news outlet Independent Journal Review.

The ceremony was in Saratoga Springs, New York, and retired New York State Supreme Court justice Jan Plumadore officiated it, the New York Times reported.

Word on the Hill: Eclipse Day
A new general in the House, lawmakers cover some ground over recess

Solar eclipse viewing glasses are going fast in advance of Monday’s solar eclipse across the United States. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

The main event of the week comes early.

The peak time to view today’s solar eclipse in Washington, D.C., is 2:42 p.m. But the fun starts around 1 p.m. From our vantage point, the moon will block part of the sun from about 1:17 p.m. to around 4:01 p.m.

Middle Schoolers Teach Sen. Kennedy ‘It’s a Lot Harder to Be a Kid Today’
Freshman Louisiana Republican senator substitute teaches eighth grade class

Sen. John Kennedy, R-La., teaches eighth-grade students about wetlands. (Sen. John Kennedy’s office)

If lawmakers thinking legislating is hard, try being a teacher — or a kid.

Sen. John Kennedy, R-La., spent some time over August recess learning that lesson from his pre-voting age constituents.

Murphy Walks Across Connecticut to Packed Town Halls
Health care, not Charlottesville, was the dominant topic, senator says

Connecticut Sen. Christopher S. Murphy greets a crowd at the finish line in Danbury, Ct. (Courtesy Murphy's Twitter page)

Connecticut Sen. Christopher S. Murphy completed his 110-mile August recess walk across his home state Thursday. It’s the same summer trek the Democratic lawmaker did last year though some of the topics he discussed this time around with constituents along the way were different. 

“When I was talking to apolitical people, which represent the majority of Connecticut, they were talking about kitchen-table issues,” Murphy said.

Word on the Hill: Peters’ Motorcycle Ride
Recess activities for Cárdenas, Ferguson and Hudson

Michigan Sen. Gary Peters toured the Aspirus Ontonagon Hospital in Ontonagon, Mich., on his bike ride. (Courtesy Peters via Twitter)

Motorcycle enthusiast Sen. Gary Peters, D-Mich., took his annual recess motorcycle tour of the Wolverine State this week.

The senator visited a rural airport to talk about President Donald Trump’s budget cuts to Essential Air Service, a government program enacted to guarantee that small communities maintain commercial airline service. 

HOH’s Guide for Watching the Eclipse in D.C.
You can either avoid or embrace the crowds

Watch here on Monday for photographs of the eclipse and the Washington Monument on Monday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The peak time to view the solar eclipse on Monday in Washington, D.C., is 2:42 p.m. The moon will block part of the sun from our area’s vantage point from about  1:17 p.m. and end around 4:01 p.m.

Only a partial solar eclipse is expected in the nation’s capital, but there are plenty of open places from which to view it. City rooftops and the National Mall will be packed with people wearing the special viewing glasses.

Word on the Hill: Capitol Hill Could Save You Money
Ryan in New Hampshire, Williams at nonprofit, Murphy’s march continues

Save some money, move to Capitol Hill. Above, Tennessee’s David Kustoff arrives at the Capitol Hill Hotel for new member orientation on Nov. 14, 2016. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Here’s some good news for congressional staffers: Capitol Hill was ranked the fourth best place in D.C. to save money if you’re living off an annual salary of $50,000.

The financial planning app Rize released a list of the 14 best and worst places to live in D.C. on a $50,000 salary. Petworth, NoMa and Southwest Waterfront ranked first, second and third, respectively. Georgetown was ranked last.

Word on the Hill: Volunteers for Tiniest Opioid Victims
Smucker on Israel, and Murphy’s still walking

Ohio Rep. Michael R. Turner, center, is flanked by volunteers at a local hospital. (Courtesy Turner via Premier Health)

Rep. Michael R. Turner, R-Ohio, recently visited volunteers who cuddle with infants going through opiate withdrawal in Dayton. 

The volunteer Infant Cuddle Program at Miami Valley Hospital was launched recently and Turner got to thank the cuddlers last week.

D.C. Books Bring D.C. Women Together
Staffer Krista Harvey kicked off women’s book club this year

Krista Harvey, center, organized the first women's book club in April. (Courtesy Tess Glancey)

When one group of Washington women found out the new White House chief of staff read the C.S. Forester novel “The General” every time he was promoted during his career, they put the book next on their reading list.

Their book club is a non-political, unstructured, low-pressure space for book lovers and networking women founded by a Capitol Hill staffer looking for just that.

Word on the Hill: Murphy Walks Again
Updates from the OOC, LOC and Historical Society

Connecticut Sen. Christopher S. Murphy is taking questions as he walks across the Nutmeg State. (Courtesy Murphy via Snapchat)

Sen. Christopher S. Murphy, D-Conn., is making his way across the Nutmeg State on foot … again.

Today is Day Three of the walk. On Monday, he walked from Willimantic to Portland, where he held an evening town hall.

Francis Rooney: Python Hunter
Freshman Republican congressman killed five of the invasive species in the Everglades

Rep. Francis Rooney, R-Fla., posted photographs and video  on Twitter with the hashtag #TheHunt. (Rep. Francis Rooney via Twitter)

What did you do during the August recess? Rep. Francis Rooney, R-Fla., went python hunting in the Everglades and helped catch and kill five of the invasive snakes.

Rooney hunted in the Everglades on Thursday night with other hunters hired by the South Florida Water Management District to remove the snakes, which are decimating the population of native mammals, the Naples Daily News reported.

The Long, Accident-Prone History of Getting the Library of Congress Out of the Capitol
Summer lecture outlines what led to the construction of one of Washington’s grand buildings

The Court of Neptune, the fountain at the front of the Thomas Jefferson Building of the Library of Congress, gets a cleaning in May. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The Library of Congress is one of the most ornate buildings in Washington, but its story isn’t nearly as magnificent as the structure — it was once extensive, complex, accident-prone, and outgrew its original home in the Capitol.

The United States Capitol Historical Society is focusing its summer lecture series this month on that story. To kick it off last week, Janice McKelvey, an LOC visitor services coordinator, traced the history of the library’s spaces in the Capitol, and discussed architectural and artistic similarities between those and its present home in the Thomas Jefferson Building.

Word on the Hill: Weekend Plans?
WOTH will be back mid-August

It's finally the weekend so get out of the Capitol — and the capital. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

It’s the weekend in Washington and the Senate recess has finally arrived, so pick up a book from our summer reading list, or if you're feeling active, try to beat the number of steps that Rep. Tim Walz, D-Minn., takes in a day.

HOH went for a walk with the congressman recently and ran some errands around the complex with him.

Word on the Hill: Get Cultured in Rayburn
Yappy hour, and honoring the Mooch

A preview of the artwork from Asian-American artists on display in Rayburn today. (Courtesy Victims of Communism Memorial Foundation)

There are three different opportunities today to check out Asian-American artists and history in the Rayburn House Office Building.

The Victims of Communism Memorial Foundation is hosting an art exhibit “War and Refuge: Reflections on the Vietnamese Refugee Experience and Its Applicability to the Global Migration Crisis” from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. in the building’s foyer. The foundation works to educate people about the ideology, history, and legacy of communism in order to create “a world free from the false hope of communism.”