Sarah Silbiger

A Hurricane, a Kavanaugh Vote and a Spending Package: Photos of the Week
The week of Sept. 10 as captured by Roll Call’s photographers

There was a watershed moment in Washington this week — three spending bills were cleared ahead of the Oct. 1 deadline and sent to the president’s desk for signature. That’s the first on-time delivery of a quarter of the annual appropriations measures in a decade.

Elsewhere in the Capitol, the Senate Judiciary panel set a final vote on the president’s nominee to the Supreme Court, Brett Kavanaugh, for Sept. 20, despite controversy. 

Photos of the Week: Back on the Hill Again
The week of Sept. 3 as captured by Roll Call’s photographers

The week began with a solemn yet powerful tribute to Sen. John McCain at the Washington National Cathedral on Saturday before he was laid to rest on Sunday in Maryland at the Naval Academy.

On Tuesday, both chambers were back on the Hill and focus turned in the Senate to the three-day-long hearing for Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh, who sat for hours and hours of questioning on Wednesday and Thursday. The protests for this nominee were plentiful.

Seen on the Hill: ‘Pictures Came and Broke Your Heart’
The photo of the day from Roll Call's photographers on Capitol Hill

Video might have killed the radio star, but in 2018, video keeps the Capitol alive.

Above, the Capitol Building’s dome is seen through the camera phone of a tourist. Visible is the Rotunda’s painting called The Apotheosis of Washington (which depicts George Washington sitting in the heavens) by Constantino Brumidi.

Photos of the Week: Kavanaugh Hits the Hill and Strzok Strikes Back at House
The week of July 9 as captured by Roll Call’s photographers

It’s almost the middle of July, but there’s no summer slowdown on Capitol Hill. The president’s Supreme Court pick was in the Capitol on Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday as senators consider his nomination to replace Justice Anthony M. Kennedy.

But the joint committee in the House that heard testimony from Peter Strzok on Thursday possibly stole the show for this week on the Hill as sparks flew between members and the FBI agent Peter Strzok.

Photos From the Campaign Trail: Independence Day Edition
Parades in Virginia and West Virginia as captured by Roll Call’s photographers

Soaring temperatures continue to grip the country this week, but that didn’t stop lawmakers and congressional hopefuls from hitting the July Fourth parade circuit Wednesday. And Roll Call’s photographers were there. 

In Virginia’s 10th District, Republican incumbent Barbara Comstock and her Democratic opponent, state Sen. Jennifer Wexton, both marched in the Independence Day parade in historic downtown Leesburg. The Toss-up race between the two is among the most competitive in the country — a must-hold for both parties in their respective quests to retain or win back the House. 

Photos of the Week: Summer Arrives in Earnest on Capitol Hill
The week of June 25 as captured by Roll Call’s photographers

Congress has left town for the 4th of July recess week. As the jet fumes fade, the heat is up in the swamp with temperatures expected in the high 90s. We hope your air conditioner is functioning properly.

Before lawmakers left, the Senate passed several appropriations bills, but the process could slow as the chamber’s focus will presumably shift toward a possible Supreme Court nominee. (President Donald Trump is reportedly considering names now.)

Hoyer: ‘There Is Joy in the Washington Capital Region Today’
Maryland lawmaker celebrates Stanley Cup win in Friday floor remarks

“Mr. Speaker, I rise with great joy and excitement to celebrate the tremendous victory last night by the Washington Capitals in the Stanley Cup finals,” Minority WhipSteny H. Hoyer said on the House floor Friday morning.

The Maryland Democrat continued: “The Caps had an extraordinary season and brought home a victory for the national capital region — its first major sports championship since 1992.”

Photos of the Day: It’s Seersucker Season
Summer Thursdays in the Senate have an optional dress code

It’s the first Seersucker Thursday in the Senate for 2018.

The tradition of wearing these lighter-fabric suits re-emerged in the late 1990s at the urging of former Majority Leader Trent Lott. The Mississippi Republican wanted to show that “the Senate isn’t just a bunch of dour folks wearing dark suits and — in the case of men — red or blue ties,” according to the Senate historian.