Georgina Gustin

FDA Releases Framework for Considering Patient Experiences in Its Medical-Device Reviews

For decades, the Food and Drug Administration and the medical device industry have puzzled over how to factor the experiences of patients when making regulatory decisions. This month, they got some answers.

Farmers Call for End to Waterway Oversight Rule

Farm groups, led by the American Farm Bureau, are calling for the EPA and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to drop a rule defining the reach of federal oversight into the nation’s waterways.

Congress Examines Threat to Water from Toxic Runoff

When 400,000 people in Ohio were told by authorities to stop drinking their tap water for two days this August, the warning centered attention on something most people assumed only troubled creatures lower down the food chain.

Agriculture Is Seeking Middle Ground Between Organic and Conventional Farming

As the Agriculture Department and farmers have watched the organics industry boom, the agency is working to find a middle ground between the needs of conventional and organic farmers.

'Organic' Label Rules Attacked by Watchdog Groups

The average consumer faces a bewildering array of food labels and symbols in the grocery store aisle. Some of these are sanctioned or overseen by government regulators. Some bear the mark of voluntary, industry-led initiatives. Some come from third-party groups. Others occupy a gray area, making marketing claims that sound good but sometimes mean very little.

Changes on Nutrition Labels Will Complicate Life for Food Manufacturers

Among the proposed changes in the more than 500 pages of regulations for the revised Nutrition Facts label are adjustments in the daily values, or reference daily intakes, of a range of nutrients such as sodium and calcium. The daily value for calcium, based on a 2,000- calorie diet, would go up from 1,000 milligrams to 1,300 milligrams, for example, and for potassium, from 3,500 milligrams to 4,700 milligrams. The reference intake for fiber would increase from 25 grams to 28 grams.

Nutrition Facts Label May Take a Hard Line on Sugar

Earlier this year, the Food and Drug Administration unveiled a revamped Nutrition Facts label for food packages, proposing changes to the iconic white box for the first time since it was adopted 20 years ago.

Pesticide Ban Is Just One Piece of Honeybee Puzzle

Neonicotinoids were first introduced in the 1990s, and are now the most used synthetic pesticides in the world.

Congress Wants to Save Honeybees by Banning Some Pesticides

They’re small and operate behind the scenes, but they’re critical to agriculture — and Congress is starting to notice.

Daily Value Changes Present Marketing Challenge

Among the proposed changes in the more than 500 pages revising the Nutrition Facts label are tweaks to the daily values, or reference daily intakes, of a range of nutrients.

FDA Nutrition Label Shift Expected to Face Pushback

When the Food and Drug Administration unveiled its revision of the iconic Nutrition Facts label that appears on processed foods and beverages earlier this year, nutritionists and consumer groups applauded the changes. Even the food industry, which resisted the labels in the first place, greeted the news with a display of muted enthusiasm.

Will Water-Trading Credits Help Reduce Pollution?

The concept sounds familiar: Polluters looking to meet certain emissions targets buy credits from other entities that have some leftover credits to spare. It’s a cap-and-trade program.

Only this one is for water pollution and the biggest players in this newly emerging environmental market are farmers. But some environmental advocacy groups dislike the idea and are looking to Congress for assistance after striking out in the courts.

Water Credit Trading Supporters Look Westward

The Chesapeake Bay watershed amounts to 64,000 square miles, contains some 10,000 tributaries and streams, serves as home to about 17 million people and is the nation’s largest estuary.

It is also one of the most environmentally and politically troubled waterways in the country — and something of a testing ground for the idea of water quality trading.

Congress Wrestles With Laws on GMO Labeling

Just a few weeks before Election Day in Washington state this year, polls showed voters were solidly behind a measure calling for labels on genetically modified food. Proponents, from state farming coalitions to D.C.-based advocacy groups, felt optimistic.

But then came a surprise, although it followed what seems to be an emerging pattern. When voters cast their ballots, the measure went down, handing the pro-label camp a defeat — though a narrow one. Only 38,000 votes separated labeling supporters from victory, out of 1.75 million.

Will FDA Salmon Ruling Lead to Labeling Law?

As the U.S. Food and Drug Administration prepares to release its final ruling on whether a genetically engineered salmon will end up in grocery stores, a handful of northwestern lawmakers are watching especially closely.

The salmon, developed by a Massachusetts-based biotech firm, AquaBounty, would be the first genetically modified animal approved for consumption and commercialization. While the FDA has already said the salmon would be safe to eat and would pose no threat to the environment, the agency has yet to flash its final green light. That approval could come any day.

Baron Still Feels Same 'Clutch' He Did as an Intern | Hill Climbers

In the summer of 1975, a 19-year-old Jason R. Baron arrived on Capitol Hill with a self-diagnosed case of Potomac Fever. He’s still got it.

For more than 33 years, Baron has served in the public sector at the intersection of information governance and federal government, most prominently as director of litigation at the National Archives and Records Administration. Last month he made the jump to the private sector, signing on with Drinker Biddle & Reath’s Information Governance and eDiscovery group.