Mike Magner

How Father Ted outdid Forrest Gump
Notre Dame president popped up everywhere in the 20th century, says director Patrick Creadon

As the Rev. Theodore M. Hesburgh was taking the reins at the University of Notre Dame in 1952, I was being born less than a mile away at St. Joseph’s Hospital, just off Notre Dame Avenue in South Bend, Indiana. And while my mother was starting me off in the world, her sister, my Aunt Helen, was beginning what would be a 35-year career as Hesburgh’s personal secretary, for his entire tenure as university president.

So for me, watching “Hesburgh,” the new documentary from ND alum and award-winning filmmaker Patrick Creadon, was like zooming out on the familiar. It was an emotional journey back through not only my own life, but also a tumultuous period for our nation — one that isn’t over yet.

Movie night: The Catholic priest who shepherded civil rights
Political Theater bonus: Episode 72

A documentary about the late Notre Dame president Fr. Theodore Hesburgh, a real life “Forrest Gump” who challenged presidents and popes in the last half-century, resonates in today’s turbulent times, the director of the film tells CQ Magazine managing editor Mike Magner, who grew up hearing about Father Ted’s work and causes. The film, directed by Patrick Creadon, explores the challenges Father Ted faced with Republican and Democratic administrations in advancing civil rights. 

Show Notes:

O’Halleran raises a Guinness to unity, St. Patrick’s parades and the Wild Rover
At the Table — where lawmakers show Roll Call their favorite place for a meal (or a drink) on the Hill

Just in time for St. Patrick’s Day, Irish American Rep. Tom O’Halleran joined Roll Call for a pint of Guinness at the Dubliner, a famed Irish pub a few blocks from the Capitol. See the video for the Arizona Democrat’s favorite Irish writer and musician, plus his St. Paddy's toast to President Donald Trump.

Grassroots Have Grown Deeper Since Trump. Now Comes the Hard Part
It hasn’t been all roses, sunshine and lollipops

First there was the shock of Donald Trump’s election. Then came the marches and protests. Next came the outraged phone calls to Congress.

Now comes the hard part: Getting people elected.

Wall Street Regulator Coddles Big Banks but Clobbers Small Firms
Lenient treatment from the SEC leaves misconduct unchecked

JPMorgan Chase, the nation’s largest financial services firm, has paid $28 billion to settle cases brought by federal agencies in the past 10 years, most of them related to the 2008 financial crisis.

Yet the massive fines extracted from banks like JPMorgan for their role in the Wall Street meltdown have done little to deter other types of misconduct in the decade since, and one reason is lenient treatment from the Securities and Exchange Commission, according to our analysis of SEC enforcement records with a Georgetown University law professor.

Podcast: Troubled Climate for Trump’s First Earth Day
The Big Story, Episode 50

President Donald Trump is moving on several fronts to deregulate environmental protection, prompting some states to intervene. But deep EPA budget cuts will get tamed by Congress, and the U.S. might stay with the Paris climate accord; even business leaders and conservative voters worry the anti-green push has gone too far, CQ Roll Call’s Mike Magner and Jeremy Dillon explain.

The National Mall Faces Crises of Funding and Identity
Current needs exceed $4 billion

Within a few days in mid-August on the National Mall, the elevator in the Washington Monument broke down for the 21st time in the past year and hundreds of fish floated to the surface of the poorly circulating pond in Constitution Gardens, just east of the Lincoln Memorial.

Aside from the smell of dead fish and the unusual sight of an egret happily feasting at the edge of the pond, most visitors to what is known as America’s front yard wouldn’t have noticed much amiss in the Mall’s grand environs.