Lauren Whittington

Rangel Kinda Sues Boehner

HOH loves any good story that begins with the phrase "Eyebrows raised on Capitol Hill," particularly when it concerns two old bulls such as Charles B. Rangel, D-N.Y., and Speaker John A. Boehner, R-Ohio, and a lawsuit!

Such is the case with this post by our own David M. Drucker about the lawsuit filed by Rangel seeking to vacate his censure by the Ethics Committee from a few years ago. It turns out that while, yes, Boehner is named in the suit, he's not really the intended target. Instead, the suit takes aim at the bipartisan committee, which was then led by Rep. Zoe Lofgren, D-Calif. Rangel claims the House was “knowingly deceived” by members of the ethics panel.

March Madness: The Distaff Bracket

Our methodology here is the same, wherein we match each school in the NCAA Division I women's basketball tournament with its House member. Since some campuses straddle one or more congressional districts, Roll Call uses each school’s admissions office ZIP code as the location by which we determine the House member who represents the school.

With a number of schools making it into both the men's and women's tournament, there are 25 House members who appear on both brackets. Some other fun facts:

March Madness, Congress-Style

Every year, we match each school in the NCAA Division I men’s basketball tournament with its House member. A note on our methodology: Because some campuses straddle one or more congressional districts (we're looking at you, University of Akron), Roll Call continues to use each school's admissions office ZIP code as the location by which we determine the House member who represents the school.

You'll note that a handful of members have a slightly better chance to take home the entire prize, as Democratic Reps. David E. Price of North Carolina, Chaka Fattah of Pennsylvania and Jared Polis of Colorado and Republican Rep. Robert W. Goodlatte of Virginia each represent districts with two schools that have made it into the tournament.

Scenes from #CPAC2013 (PHOTOS)

The Conservative Political Action Conference is celebrating its 40th anniversary this year in a new location: across the D.C. line (but still within the Beltway) at National Harbor, Md. Although it's a new location, the event remains a central focus this week for the Washington press corps, including team coverage from CQ Roll Call.

The event wraps up Saturday with straw poll results announced around 5 p.m.

Scenes from #CPAC2013 (PHOTOS)

The Conservative Political Action Conference is celebrating its 40th anniversary this year in a new location: across the D.C. line (but still within the Beltway) at National Harbor, Md. Although it’s a new location, the event remains a central focus this week for the Washington press corps, including team coverage from CQ Roll Call.

The event wraps up Saturday with straw poll results announced around 5 p.m.

California: Bera Defeats Lungren

Democrat Ami Bera has officially prevailed over House Administration Chairman Dan Lungren, R-Calif., who becomes the 24th House incumbent to lose in the Nov. 6 elections.

The Associated Press called the race Thursday, more than one week after Election Day, with Bera leading by about 5,700 votes. Vote counting has been slow in the Sacramento-area district, where Bera's lead on election night was only 184 votes.

Race Rating Changes: The Final Push

Heading into the final weekend of barnstorming before Election Day, there was a noticeable shift toward the GOP in many key House races while Democrats seem to be getting more good news than bad about the Senate map.

First, the Senate math:

Race Rating Changes: The Final Push

Heading into the final weekend of barnstorming before Election Day, there was a noticeable shift toward the GOP in many key House races while Democrats seem to be getting more good news than bad about the Senate map.

First, the Senate math:

Race Ratings Changes: Less Than One Month to Go

One year ago it would have been hard to picture both the Arizona and Connecticut open-seat Senate races as Tossups with less than a month to go before Election Day. But funny things can happen to the Senate battleground map based on candidates and the campaigns they run — just ask Republicans this cycle about Missouri.

The open-seat Senate races in the Nutmeg State and the Grand Canyon State are thousands of miles apart, yet share some distinct similarities. Both feature House Members who began the race as the heavy frontrunner and challengers who have surged based on the strength of their campaigns. Those challengers will still have to overcome a heavy partisan disadvantage at the presidential level, but that prospect seems to be increasingly possible. Therefore, we are moving both races into the tossup column, even though in both races, the party that currently holds the seat still has a very small advantage.

Race Rating Changes: House Map Jells; Senate Still Fluid

What a difference two years makes. At this point in 2010, as the GOP wave began to build, political handicappers and political operatives alike were trying to keep up with the number of newly competitive races moving onto the rapidly expanding House battleground. The same was true at this time in 2006 and 2008, when we were attempting to size up the coming Democratic waves.

Fast-forward two years, and a month before Election Day we are taking House races off the board, as it becomes clear to both parties that contests they hoped to put in play just haven't materialized this cycle. We expect there may be a few less competitive races that begin to move in the competitive direction, but that hasn't happened to a large extent at this point.

Race Rating Changes: House Map Jells; Senate Still Fluid

What a difference two years makes. At this point in 2010, as the GOP wave began to build, political handicappers and political operatives alike were trying to keep up with the number of newly competitive races moving onto the rapidly expanding House battleground. The same was true at this time in 2006 and 2008, when we were attempting to size up the coming Democratic waves.

Fast-forward two years, and a month before Election Day we are taking House races off the board, as it becomes clear to both parties that contests they hoped to put in play just haven’t materialized this cycle. We expect there may be a few less competitive races that begin to move in the competitive direction, but that hasn’t happened to a large extent at this point.

Mitt Romney Picks Paul Ryan as Running Mate

Updated 7:19 a.m. | Mitt Romney has tapped Wisconsin Rep. Paul Ryan to be his vice presidential running mate, his campaign announced Saturday morning.

Official word of the pick came via a press release a little after 7 a.m. titled "Mitt Romney & Paul Ryan: America's Comeback Team." The pick was first reported in the wee hours of Saturday morning by NBC News' Chuck Todd, who cited three sources.

Mitt Romney to Announce VP Pick Saturday

After weeks and months of speculation about whom Mitt Romney will tap to be his vice presidential running mate, the presumptive GOP nominee will unveil his pick on Saturday morning in Norfolk, Va.

Romney's campaign released a media advisory just after 11 p.m. tonight announcing that the news would come as the former Massachusetts governor kicks off of his bus tour.

Several Texas House Races Headed for Runoffs

Updated 2:10 a.m. | HOUSTON — With few House incumbents facing competitive primaries Tuesday in Texas, most of the action was in a handful of contests for safe open and new seats. As expected, almost all of those crowed races will be decided by July 31 runoffs after no candidate was able to get at least 50 percent of the primary vote.

Democrats were unable to avoid a runoff in the one district that is expected to be competitive this fall. State Rep. Pete Gallego will face former Rep. Ciro Rodriguez in the Democratic runoff in the redrawn majority-Hispanic 23rd district. The winner will take on freshman Rep. Francisco "Quico" Canseco (R), who is a top target for Democrats.

California: New Howard Berman Ad Features Betty White

Betty White, the 90-year-old actress starring in the hit TV show "Hot in Cleveland," just waded into the hottest Congressional race in the San Fernando Valley.

White's endorsement is featured prominently in an ad for Rep. Howard Berman, who is facing off against fellow Democratic Rep. Brad Sherman after redistricting. The spot stars White and her "Hot in Cleveland" co-star Wendie Malick, both of whom attest to Berman's effectiveness in Congress — specifically citing his support for the humane treatment of animals and community safety.

Supreme Scenes: The Health Care Arguments (PHOTOS)

The Supreme Court kicked off the widely anticipated arguments over President Barack Obama's health care law today. You can read Steven Dennis' roundup from the opening day arguments here.

Today's proceedings were more procedural than anything, with both sides in agreement that the case should be heard now and not in three years' time.

Maine: Mike Michaud Staying Put in House, Won’t Run for Senate

Maine Rep. Mike Michaud announced tonight that he will not run to replace retiring Sen. Olympia Snowe (R), a move that all but ensures fellow Democratic Rep. Chellie Pingree will enter the race.

Michaud and Pingree had both moved to begin collecting signatures in the hours after Snowe's surprise announcement on Tuesday, which came about two weeks before the state's filing deadline. But Michaud, first elected to Congress in 2002, said he is staying put for now.

Morning Roundup: Member-Vs.-Member Races

The front page of today's Roll Call features Shira Toeplitz's report from the ground in Cleveland and Toledo, Ohio, on the Democratic primary between Reps. Marcy Kaptur and Dennis Kucinich. Their March 6 contest will be the first of 12 Member-vs.-Member races decided this redistricting cycle.

The numbers in the redrawn 9th district, which stretches 120 miles along Lake Erie’s shoreline, favor Kaptur over Kucinich because it takes in more of her current territory. But, as Toeplitz points out, long odds have never stopped the two-time failed presidential candidate and one-time "boy mayor" of Cleveland from running before.

Morning Roundup: Member-Vs.-Member Races

The front page of today’s Roll Call features Shira Toeplitz’s report from the ground in Cleveland and Toledo, Ohio, on the Democratic primary between Reps. Marcy Kaptur and Dennis Kucinich. Their March 6 contest will be the first of 12 Member-vs.-Member races decided this redistricting cycle.

The numbers in the redrawn 9th district, which stretches 120 miles along Lake Erie’s shoreline, favor Kaptur over Kucinich because it takes in more of her current territory. But, as Toeplitz points out, long odds have never stopped the two-time failed presidential candidate and one-time “boy mayor” of Cleveland from running before.

Mitt Romney Goes Two for Two With Maine Win

Former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney won the non-binding Maine presidential caucuses today, capping off a day on which he also won the Conservative Political Action Conference straw poll.

Romney took 39 percent of the vote in Maine, where fewer than 5,600 votes were cast, followed by Rep. Ron Paul (texas), who got 36 percent of the vote. Former Sen. Rick Santorum (Pa.) and former Speaker Newt Gingrich (Ga.) did not compete in the Pine Tree State but got 18 percent and 6 percent, respectively.