Katherine Tully-McManus

Rep. Nadler appears to ‘almost pass out,’ gets medical help at event
The New York Rep. was at a press conference with New York Mayor Bill de Blasio

House Judiciary Chairman Jerrold Nadler came close to collapse in his home state of New York while attending an event with Mayor Bill de Blasio.

At a Friday press conference in New York City, de Blasio came to Nadler’s aid, offering water and making sure the fellow Democrat was feeling alright. The press conference was held at P.S. 199 in the Upper West Side of Manhattan. 

What’s the state of play on intern pay on Capitol Hill?
Intern compensation funding is up for discussion again

Securing intern compensation funding last year was a huge victory for lawmakers and advocates. Now they just have to figure out how to get the word out and expand the pie. 

As interns descend on Capitol Hill for a summer of public service, more will be paid for their work than ever before. But widespread paid internships are still in their infancy in Congress. This is the first summer that House and Senate offices have dedicated funding available to cut checks.

Senate backs bill to stem flood of robocalls plaguing cell phones
Bipartisan effort would increase civil penalties to $10,000 per call

Lawmakers are fed up with the barrage of scam and nuisance calls plaguing them and their constituents and on Thursday, the Senate passed a bipartisan measure to combat robocalls.

Senators voted, 97-1, to pass a bill (S 151) designed to authenticate and block robocalls and enforce penalties on scammers who use automated equipment to pump phones full of bogus calls.

Exiting Capitol Police chief honored by Pelosi, McCarthy
Matthew Verderosa retiring after three decades on the force

After more than three decades on the force, Capitol Police Chief Matthew Verderosa received recognition and a fond farewell from Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy on the House floor Wednesday.

“Police Chief Verderosa has proven himself as leader of the highest patriotism and professionalism who has proudly carried forth the Capitol Police’s nearly two centuries of storied service,” Pelosi said on the floor.

Infrastructure talks run off the road by latest Trump, Dem fracas

A White House meeting Wednesday on infrastructure between President Donald Trump and top congressional Democrats ended almost as soon as it began after the president pledged not to work with Democrats on any policy priorities until they ended investigations into his administration and campaign.

Trump left the meeting with Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer after just a few minutes, a move that the two Democrats said was staged ahead of time.

Rep. Trone calls for Naloxone training for House members and staff 

Rep. David Trone is calling on Congress’ Office of the Attending Physician to provide information and training about carrying and administering the opioid overdose reversal drug naloxone.

“I urge you, in your capacity as Attending Physician, to provide naloxone information and training to interested congressional offices,” he wrote in a letter Wednesday to Dr. Brian P. Monahan, the attending physician.

Rayburn evacuated after alarms sound throughout building
The exact cause of the alarm and evacuation is not yet known

Lawmakers, staff and visitors were evacuated for almost two hours on Tuesday afternoon after fire alarms sounded throughout the Rayburn House Office Building.

Capitol Police and Architect of the Capitol staff were on the scene, including a fire marshal and emergency management personnel. Staff was evacuated at about 1:30 p.m. and allowed to return after 3:15 p.m. 

Activists urging Congress to impeach Trump arrested in Cannon
About 20 protesters were arrested as they attempted to “occupy” the Cannon rotunda

A group of activists attempted to “occupy” the Cannon rotunda Tuesday morning before approximately 20 people were arrested by Capitol Police.

The protesters were calling for the House to initiate impeachment proceedings against President Donald Trump.

House Democrats telegraph policy priorities in Capitol Hill funding
Comparison of previous GOP, current Dem spending choices show differences

Empowered by their control of the House, Democrats are telegraphing their policy priorities in how they plan to spend taxpayer dollars on Capitol Hill, including exploring student debt relief options and employing Dreamers in Congress.

The fiscal 2020 House Legislative Branch Appropriations bill is signaling what types of issues Democrats want to be talking about and working on, both for their constituents back home and right here on Capitol Hill.

House spending panel advances measure boosting congressional funding

The House Appropriations Committee advanced a $3.97 billion fiscal 2020 Legislative Branch spending measure Thursday, following tension over total funding levels and the absence of a final budget agreement.

The panel voted 28-22 to report the draft bill to the floor, which would provide $164 million more than enacted fiscal 2019 levels.

Just where is this secret House jail located?
A Capitol basement investigation yielded some answers

Speaker Nancy Pelosi resurfaced one of the Capitol’s most enduring mysteries when answering a question about whether Democrats might imprison Trump administration officials who defy Congress: the House jail. But where is this mysterious cell?

“We do have a little jail down in the basement of the Capitol, but if we were arresting all of the people in the administration, we would have an overcrowded jail situation. And I’m not for that,” Pelosi said Wednesday at a Washington Post live event.

Lawmakers explore House-wide paid family leave policy
Appropriators request study of cost and feasibility

House lawmakers are interested in what a chamber-wide paid family leave policy would look like and how much it would cost. And staffers are likely  curious, too. Currently, paid maternity and paternity leave for congressional staff remains entirely at the whim of individual members.

“There is interest among Members of Congress to investigate the feasibility of implementing a standard House-wide paid family leave policy,” reads the committee report to accompany the fiscal 2020 House Legislative Branch Appropriations bill.

Native American representation on Capitol Hill concerns House lawmakers
Appropriators take aim at what they call offensive art and disrespectful tours

House lawmakers are raising issues about Native American representation in and around the Capitol — and they aren’t talking about the record number of Native American women in the 116th Congress.

A House Appropriations Committee report released Wednesday highlights disrespectful descriptions of Native Americans on Capitol tours and depictions in artwork around the Capitol campus, which “do not portray Native Americans as equals or Indian nations as independent sovereigns.” 

Sen. Mike Enzi announces he will retire rather than seek a fifth term
Wyoming Republican has served in the Senate for more that two decades

Wyoming Republican Michael B. Enzi announced Saturday that he will not run for re-election in 2020 after more than two decades in the Senate.

Enzi’s decision — which he announced at a press conference in Wyoming, according to the Casper Star-Tribune — opens up a seat in the strongly Republican state.

House committee renews ethics inquiries into Collins, Hunter and Schweikert
Probes of Hunter and Collins, who are under indictment, put on hold at Justice Department request

House Ethics Committee investigations into Republicans Chris Collins of New York, Duncan Hunter of California and David Schweikert of Arizona were reauthorized for the 116th Congress this week.

The Ethics Committee voted unanimously to reauthorize investigative subcommittees looking into the three lawmakers, but the panel agreed to a Justice Department request to put its probes into Collins and Hunter on hold as they battle criminal indictments.

House Ethics launches new system for fundraising exemption requests
Memo also reminds lawmakers of existing fundraising rules

The House Ethics Committee issued a memo Thursday, informing lawmakers of a new simplified way to request a waiver from fundraising rules and reminding them of exactly what those rules are.

“Please note, the circumstances under which Members, officers, and employees may engage in fundraising activities are very fact specific,” reads the memo from Chairman Ted Deutch of Florida and ranking member Kenny Marchant of Texas.

Calling all reporters to Rayburn! New press space unveiled
Revamped space replaces old home base for covering hearings and markup action

After a long process of moving and renovation, the Capitol Hill press corps is working in a dedicated space in the Rayburn House Office Building, replacing one that served as both time capsule and workspace.

The press area, located on the basement level across from the Rayburn cafeteria, is available to all credentialed journalists. It provides reporters with desks, wifi, power outlets and other essential elements of modern news coverage, much closer to the hearings and markups that happen in the House office buildings.

Scooter commuters of Capitol Hill, take note
Electric scooters have become a ‘safety and security concern’ for Capitol Police

Electric scooters have been on the scene in Washington for more than a year, but they’re starting to raise safety and security concerns on Capitol Hill.

The two-wheelers have grown in popularity as a commuting option for congressional staffers, tourists and other visitors, especially as the weather warms up. Rep. Vicky Hartzler tweeted out her observation that scooters may be rivaling bikes in terms of two-wheeled transport.

Capitol Police Chief Matthew Verderosa to retire May 31
Top cop exits after a 34-year career in law enforcement

Capitol Police Chief Matthew R. Verderosa announced Wednesday that he will retire from the force on May 31, after a 34-year career in law enforcement and three years leading the force.

“One of the proudest days of my life was when I was sworn-in as Chief of Police. I want to thank the Capitol Police Board for giving me the opportunity to lead the employees of the United States Capitol Police. Leading the Department has been the capstone of my career. It has been an honor to serve the Congress and the Department since September 12, 1986,” he wrote in a letter to the Capitol Police Board.

Legislative Branch spending bill opens door for employing Dreamers on Capitol Hill
$3.9 billion measure would boost funding for interns, revive defunct technology office

Democrats touted the revival of the defunct Office of Technology Assessment and the legal employment of so-called Dreamers in the $3.94 billion House Legislative Branch Appropriations bill they released Tuesday.

The fiscal 2020 proposal includes an overall proposed increase of $135 million, or 3.6 percent more than the current funding level, according to a summary. The Legislative Branch subcommittee is set to take up the bill at a markup on Wednesday.