Jay Hunter

House Republicans Invested in Keystone's Canadian Parent

House Republicans Curt Clawson of Florida and David Joyce of Ohio have invested in the stock of TransCanada Corp., which has been trying to gain U.S. government permission to build the Keystone XL oil pipeline from Canada. The lawmakers recently reported the investments in their financial disclosure forms for calendar year 2014.

Boehner Profile: Achievements and Pitfalls Mark Recent Years

Speaker John A. Boehner's stunning announcement Friday that he will resign from his House seat next month caps a 25-year career marked by legislative victories and intra-party conflicts. 

Obama's Capital Gains Tax Plan Would Hit Hill's Richest, Spare 2016 Aspirants

President Barack Obama pitched his proposal to increase the top capital gains and dividend tax rate to 28 percent from 23.8 percent as part of a simpler, fairer tax code that would favor the middle class. The proposed tax increase is designed to fall on the wealthy.

These Members of Congress Report Having No Assets

In a Congress packed with millionaires and near-millionaires , six lawmakers stand out on the other end of the spectrum — they didn’t report a single asset on their financial disclosure forms.  

The lack of a reported investment asset alone doesn’t mean these lawmakers are penniless, and none of them have enough debt to land on Roll Call's list of the 10 'Poorest' Members of Congress .   (Visit our interactive to see the full ranking, which includes representatives, senators and delegates. Because there are three vacancies in Congress, there are 538 members on the list.) Several common types of assets do not have to be reported: checking accounts that don’t bear interest, home equity and personal possessions such as cars and furnishings.  

Wealth of Congress Jumps $150 Million

It was a good year for members of Congress in one respect: their pocketbooks.  

Roll Call has for decades calculated the "50 Richest" members of Congress by poring through financial disclosure forms, and this year, we've taken the added step of tallying the minimum net worth of every member of Congress .   (Visit our interactive to see the full ranking, which includes representatives, senators and delegates. Because there are three vacancies in Congress, there are 538 members on the list.) The combined minimum net worth of Congress jumped — up more than $150 million to $2.1 billion — according to a CQ Roll Call analysis of the financial disclosure forms for every member of Congress and delegate who filed one for 2013.  

These Members of Congress Report Having No Assets

In a Congress packed with millionaires and near-millionaires, six lawmakers stand out on the other end of the spectrum — they didn’t report a single asset on their financial disclosure forms.

The lack of a reported investment asset alone doesn’t mean these lawmakers are penniless, and none of them have enough debt to land on Roll Call’s list of the 10 ‘Poorest’ Members of Congress. (Visit our interactive to see the full ranking, which includes representatives, senators and delegates. Because there are three vacancies in Congress, there are 538 members on the list.)

Wealth of Congress Jumps $150 Million

It was a good year for members of Congress in one respect: their pocketbooks.

Roll Call has for decades calculated the “50 Richest” members of Congress by poring through financial disclosure forms, and this year, we’ve taken the added step of tallying the minimum net worth of every member of Congress. (Visit our interactive to see the full ranking, which includes representatives, senators and delegates. Because there are three vacancies in Congress, there are 538 members on the list.)

Roll Call's 50 Richest Members of Congress for 2014

They invested in an Italian soccer team, an aquaculture business, Subway sandwich franchises, the ride-share phenomenon Uber and good old blue chip stocks and bonds.  

The richest members of Congress found myriad ways to get wealthier in 2013, CQ Roll Call’s annual survey of congressional wealth shows.  

2013's Most Interesting Financial Disclosures

The annual congressional financial disclosure forms come in various sizes (from three pages to hundreds), styles (some are hand-written, others are farmed-out to third party accountants) and submissions (from on-time to extensions and even, possibly, amendments) with listed assets varying from college savings plans  to professional sports teams.

As another year comes to an end, here is a look back at some of the most notable items gleaned from this year’s forms, which report assets from the 2012 calendar year.

Wanna Get Away? 50 Richest Members Are Renting

The second homes and vacation properties of the 50 richest members of Congress bring to mind the Beach Boys’ “Kokomo:” 15 members on the list hold multimillion-dollar investment properties from Japan to Jamaica and from Bermuda to the Bahamas.

A CQ Roll Call analysis of the 2012 financial disclosure reports of the 50 richest members shows that many hold real estate properties outside of their home states and the District of Columbia that are either used as investments or as vacation escapes.

10 'Poorest' Members of Congress Owe Big

Members of the second-most-exclusive club in Congress don’t reside in the poor house, but unlike the 50 richest members, the 10 “poorest” are seriously in debt.

Eight Democrats and two Republicans ranked at the bottom of the list of the 535 lawmakers in the House and Senate in our annual calculations for the 50 Richest project. These dairy farmers, lawyers, business owners and lifetime public officials have significant assets and might actually be considered wealthy by some, but they have the smallest minimum net worths because they all hold massive debts and liabilities of at least $500,000, including obligations such as mortgages on multiple homes, overdue taxes and legal fees.

The 50 Richest List: Methodology

CQ Roll Call has calculated the net worth of every member of Congress every year since 1990. Net worth is derived by subtracting total minimum liabilities from total minimum assets reported in members’ annual financial disclosure statements.

Members are required to report their assets and liabilities only in broad ranges of minimums, starting at $1 to $1,000 and ending with any asset or liability worth $50 million or more. Total minimum assets and liabilities are calculated by summing the lower ends of the ranges given for each individual asset and liability.

50 Richest Members of Congress: The Wealth Keeps Growing

A surprisingly strong year in the financial markets made the richest members of Congress even wealthier in 2012, with the median net worth of the 50 richest rising more than 17 percent, CQ Roll Call’s annual survey of congressional wealth shows.

Lawmakers’ portfolios shrugged off pre-election jitters, concerns about the European debt crisis and suspense surrounding the fiscal cliff. It took a minimum reported net worth of $6.67 million just to crack the exclusive 50 Richest club.

Polis Builds Unusual, but Profitable, Financial Portfolio

Rep. Jared Polis isn’t your typical congressional investor.

On the surface, the Colorado Democrat’s net worth of $68 million — with $17 million in real estate assets, $30 million in various corporate stock and mutual funds, and a $25 million-$50 million blind trust — looks rather common for a federal lawmaker. However, half of his real estate is in Japanese retirement housing, and most of his stock is in businesses such as an open-sea fish farm off the coast of Panama and a movie production company based in Denver.