Jason Dick

Ralph Regula, Avuncular Appropriator from Ohio, Dies at 92
Canton-area congressman unapologetic for pushing bipartisanship

Former Rep. Ralph Regula, a moderate Republican from Ohio known for his deal-cutting acumen, avuncular manner and skills as an appropriator, died July 19. He was 92.

Born in Beach City, Ohio on Dec. 3, 1924, Regula was first elected to Congress in 1972 after stints in the Ohio state House and Senate. Between then and his retirement after the 2008 elections, he embodied a middle-of-the-road Midwestern approach to politics that valued working across the aisle and taking care of the folks back home.

In Memoriam: Bob Wolff, Broadcast Legend and Voice of Washington Senators
TV pioneer interviewed some of sports’ greatest figures

It was the understatement of Bob Wolff’s career, under the circumstances.

“I do get very verbose,” Wolff said on April 26, 2013, the day the legendary sportscaster donated decades’ worth of his interviews with sports’ greatest figures to the Library of Congress

Latest GOP Leadership Health Care Plan Bleeding Support
Some senators have doubts about repeal-only proposal

Senate Republican leaders continued to push their strategy to repeal the 2010 health care law, leaning on support from the White House even as their rank and file continued to express doubts about such an approach. 

“I regret that the effort to repeal and immediately replace the failures of Obamacare will not be successful,” Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said in his opening remarks on the Senate floor Tuesday morning. The Kentucky Republican wants his colleagues to vote soon on a procedural motion to get to the House-passed health care legislation so he can offer an amendment modeled on legislation Congress passed in 2015 to repeal the 2010 law.

Podcast: Short Recess, Long on Goals
The Big Story, Episode 62

The Senate will stick around Washington a little longer in August, shortening its recess to focus on an ambitious agenda. The list of things to do could include confirming the new FBI director. CQ Roll Call Senior Senate Reporter Niels Lesniewski and Leadership Editor Jason Dick break down what is doable.

Gaming Out the Senate’s Strategy on Health Care Bill This Week
 

Leadership editor Jason Dick and Senate reporter Joe Williams preview what to look for in the Congressional Budget Office scoring of the Senate bill to repeal and replace Obamacare and discuss Republicans’ options in bringing the bill to a vote this week. Watch for more on what to expect in the week ahead with all eyes on the Senate health care bill....
Podcast: What We Learned From 2017’s Special Elections
The Big Story, Episode 59

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The History of the Congressional Baseball Game, 108 Years In

The annual face-off between Democrats and Republicans continues Thursday evening at 7:05 p.m., after a Wednesday morning shooting at the GOP practice shocked Washington and the nation. Roll Call editor Jason Dick takes a step back to recap the history of the game, Roll Call's involvement in its renaissance and more. The game, as both managers said this week, will...
At AFI Docs, Timely Topics

AFI Docs, the annual documentary film festival put on by the American Film Institute in Washington, has to plan months ahead to get its slate of nonfiction movies.

Nevertheless, festival organizers seem to have a knack for finding films that have political currency.

House Cancels Votes in Wake of Shooting
Hearings, events across Capitol also postponed

The House canceled floor votes on Wednesday in the wake of the shooting at the Republican baseball practice in Alexandria, Va. 

Several hearings across the Capitol, including an Appropriations subcommittee that was due to examine the budget of the Capitol Police, were canceled or postponed. 

Schumer Passes on Chance to Star With Kate Mara
Capitol Hill gets cameo in new film ‘Megan Leavey’

The old saying that the most dangerous place in Washington is between Sen. Charles E. Schumer and a camera? New evidence suggests otherwise.

“I didn’t want to ruin the film,” the New York Democrat said about turning down an offer to play himself in the new movie “Megan Leavey.”

Podcast: Senate Picks Up Pace on GOP Health Care Bill
The Big Story, Episode 57

President Donald Trump with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky. (CQ Roll Call/File Photo)

After a series of fits and starts, the Senate is starting to clear a path so it can consider legislation dismantling Obamacare, say CQ Roll Call’s Jason Dick and Ed Pesce. They review how the Senate got there and what’s next.

Lessons of a "Shattered" Campaign
The Big Story, Episode 55

Democrats heading into the 2018 mid-term elections should pay attention to the party hubris that likely contributed to Hillary Clinton’s presidential loss, says Jonathan Allen, CQ Roll Call columnist and co-author of the best-selling book “Shattered."

Show Notes:

Having Fun With the Health Care Bill Holdup
Hoyer needles McCarthy about delay in sending House bill to Senate

House Minority Leader Steny H. Hoyer had a little fun with his Republican colleagues’ delay in transmitting their health care overhaul legislation to the Senate.

“You can imagine my shock, chagrin and surprise when I learned yesterday that bill has not gone to the Senate. Apparently it’s gone from one chair to the other chair in the desks before me,” the Maryland Democrat needled House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., in their colloquy on the floor Friday. He asked McCarthy if there would need to be another vote on the bill and when it will be sent to the Senate.

Special Elections in the Time of Trump
The Big Story, Episode 54

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Mitch McConnell, Still Playing the Long Game
Trump revelations, FBI director search, don't rattle majority leader

BY JASON DICK AND JOE WILLIAMS, CQ ROLL CALL

It’s difficult to get Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell to play anything but “The Long Game,” the Kentucky Republican’s political strategy, encapsulated by his 2016 memoir of the same name.

The Art of the Spending Deal
The Big Story, Episode 52

Congress struck a deal on a long-overdue spending bill, and all hell broke loose. CQ Roll Call’s Jason Dick, Niels Lesniewski and Walter Shapiro discuss how Washington’s dynamics prevent even a small victory party from breaking out.

With End in Sight for Omnibus, Dissonance Takes Over
Sore feelings take hold even as deal heads to passage

On a day Congress could have spent singing the praises of a bipartisan agreement to wrap up the long-overdue fiscal 2017 spending process, seemingly everyone — from Capitol Hill to the White House — found a way to hit dissonant notes. 

“They’re walking around acting like they pulled a fast one on the president, and I just won’t stand for it,” Office of Management and Budget Director Mick Mulvaney said Tuesday afternoon at the third of three press briefings he conducted in a 24-hour period after congressional Democrats started effusively praising the omnibus spending deal as a win for their priorities.

Podcast: Trump’s Empty Seats
Ep. 48: Senate could become ‘full-time confirmation machine,’ squeezing time needed for legislation

The Senate is waiting for hundreds of high-profile nominations to lead the federal government and the U.S. court system, but it might be a long time before any of those people settle into their new jobs, says CQ Roll Call’s Senior Legislative Analyst Ed Pesce. Many must wade through the Senate’s approval process and that could turn the chamber into a "full-time confirmation machine,'' squeezing time needed for legislation.

Show Notes:

Q&A: Davita Vance-Cooks, Director of the Government Publishing Office
First female and first African-American head discusses GPO’s history and mission

Davita Vance-Cooks is the 27th public printer of the United States, the first woman and the first African-American to hold the post. She spoke with Roll Call recently about the Government Publishing Office’s purpose and place in documenting the government’s wide range of activity and how it fits into a rapidly expanding digital-first world. 

This interview has been edited for brevity and clarity.

Senate Needs All Hands, Including Vice President, on Measure to Restrict Health Funds
Johnny Isakson, Mike Pence allow Senate to consider joint resolution

The Senate needed a senator just returning from back surgery and the vice president to break a tie just to proceed to a measure that would allow states to restrict funding to health care providers that provide abortion.

With Republicans Lisa Murkowski of Alaska and Susan Collins of Maine voting against proceeding to the joint resolution, the chamber had to wait for Georgia Republican Johnny Isakson to return to the floor with the aid of a walker just to get to 50-50.