Jason Dick

Black History Month: Sen. Tim Scott on Black Leaders Who Inspire Him
 

Roll Call’s Black History Month series talks with lawmakers and Hill figures to explore the intersection of black history and life in Congress and the Capitol building itself....
Puzder Is First Trump Nominee Spiked by GOP
Votes just weren’t there for fast-food tycoon

The withdrawal of Andrew Puzder’s nomination to be Labor secretary represents a milestone in the nascent Trump administration: the first time congressional Republicans played a significant part in spiking a Donald Trump Cabinet pick. 

The nomination of the CEO of CKE Restaurants, which runs the Carl’s Jr. and Hardee’s chains, had been plagued by scandal, including revelations he had employed an undocumented immigrant as a housekeeper and failed to pay taxes on her, as well as the fallout from a 1987 divorce that brought up allegations of domestic violence against him.

Black History Month: Sen. Tim Scott Recounts Taking His Teary-Eyed Grandfather to Vote for Obama

Roll Call’s Black History Month series talks with lawmakers and Hill figures to explore the intersection of black history and life in Congress and the Capitol building itself....
Black History Month: Tim Scott on What His Election Meant, and What Obama's Election Meant to His Grandfather
Roll Call's series with lawmakers and Capitol Hill figures continues

Sen. Tim Scott sees a lot of progress in his election and the election of the first African-American president more than eight years ago. Both show “what’s possible,” he said. 

Roll Call’s series of interviews with lawmakers and Capitol Hill figures during Black History Month continues with our discussion with the South Carolina Republican.

Black History Month: Sen. Tim Scott on the Evolving Southern Voter

Roll Call’s Black History Month series talks with lawmakers and Hill figures to explore the intersection of black history and life in Congress and the Capitol building itself....
White House Puts GOP in Awkward Position
Flynn fallout, security considerations keep dominating news

President Donald Trump’s domination of the news, whether due to the resignation of national security adviser Michael Flynn or the spectacle of the president discussing national security at his Mar-a-Lago resort’s dining room, is putting Republican leaders in an awkward position.

“Look, I — I — you’ll have to ask those — the White House those kinds of questions,” Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said Tuesday at his traditional media availability after the Republicans’ policy lunch. 

No Party Line for GOP on Flynn Fallout
Members left to guess about next steps in inquiry

Republicans were swarmed on Tuesday with questions about what President Donald Trump knew and when did he know about former national security adviser Michael Flynn’s questionable interactions with Russian authorities. But there was little consensus on the best venue for getting to the bottom of it.

“I think it’s good for the American people to understand, in a fulsome way, everything that’s happened. And to get it behind us,” Senate Foreign Relations Chairman Bob Corker said. “This is going to go on forever if we don’t address it somehow.”

Black History Month: Roll Call Talks with Barry Black, the First African American Senate Chaplain
 

Roll Call’s Black History Month series talks with lawmakers and Hill figures to explore the intersection of black history and life in Congress and the Capitol building itself....
Black History Month: Senate Chaplain Reflects on Rosa Parks and Being the First African-American in Role
Roll Call's series with lawmakers and Capitol Hill figures continues this week

For Senate Chaplain Barry C. Black, this month is an “important reminder.” Roll Call’s series of interviews with lawmakers and Capitol Hill figures continues with a step away from politics during a sit-down with this nonpartisan fixture of the Senate — the first African-American to hold the role. 

Watch more interviews and the video, “Black History and America’s Capitol,” which combines all these talks, at rollcall.com/black-history-month. Black’s full discussion with Roll Call is below.

Jeff Sessions Caps Off 31-Year Comeback
Once rejected for a judgeship, the Alabamian is now nation's top cop

More than 30 years ago, Jeff Sessions probably couldn’t have imagined what just happened. Sworn in as attorney general Thursday after being confirmed Wednesday by the same body that once rejected his bid to be a federal judge, the Alabama Republican now faces the monumental task of enforcing the nation’s laws when its lawmakers are at each others’ throats.

In 1986, the Republican-controlled Judiciary Committee rejected Sessions’ nomination to be a federal district judge in Alabama. Sessions, who was then a U.S. attorney, dusted himself off and began a long political assent that culminated in Wednesday’s 52-47 vote. The same issues that bedeviled Sessions in the 1980s, questions about whether he sought to suppress black voter turnout and whether his views on race made him fit for public service, defined the nasty confirmation fight he faced.

Ep. 40: Elizabeth Warren’s War: Risk or Rebuke?

Senate Republican Leader Mitch McConnell's selectively applied rebuke of Democratic Sen. Elizabeth Warren touched on volatile issues of race and gender, say, CQ Roll Call's Leadership editor Jason Dick and policy Editor Catalina Camia.

Celebrating Black History Month With Added Resonance
Obama retirement, record number of black lawmakers mark 2017

Black History Month this year has taken on an added resonance, reflected in the record number of African-Americans in Congress.

In the Senate, it has been a long buildup to the current high-water mark of three members: Republican Tim Scott of South Carolina and Democrats Cory Booker of New Jersey and Kamala Harris of California. 

Black History and America’s Capitol
 

This February, Black History Month marks its 41st year as a monthlong tradition. Explore the history of this reflective and celebratory time with lawmakers and other Capitol Hill figures who discuss the intersection of black history and the U.S. Capitol building and its surrounding city.

Black History Month: Cedric Richmond on the ‘Work to Do’ Ahead
CBC chairman says promises of King, Chisholm haven’t yet been fulfilled

For Congressional Black Caucus Chairman Cedric L. Richmond, this month is about teaching. First celebrated in 1926 as a weeklong tribute to black history and culture and expanded to a monthlong honor in 1976, Black History Month is a time of reflection and festivity for many African-Americans. Roll Call interviewed Richmond and several other lawmakers and Capitol Hill figures, such as Senate Chaplain Barry C. Black, to find out what the intersection of black history and life in Congress and the Capitol building itself means to them.

Watch interviews and the video, “Black History and America's Capitol,” which combines all these talks, at rollcall.com/black-history-month. Richmond’s full discussion with Roll Call is below.

Black History Month: Roll Call Talks with Rep. Cedric L. Richmond, CBC Chair

Roll Call’s Black History Month series talks with lawmakers and Hill figures to explore the intersection of black history and life in Congress and the Capitol building itself....
GOP Leaders Move to Shore Up Shaky DeVos Nomination
Education nominee moves up in the floor queue

Congress Threatens Legislation to Keep Russia Sanctions
John McCain, Adam Schiff and Rob Portman in no mood to make nice

Members of Congress on both sides of the aisle pushed back hard at hints that President Donald Trump would lift economic sanctions against Russia.

Appearing alongside British Prime Minister Theresa May on Friday, Trump said it was “very early to be talking about” lifting sanctions on Russia, a point echoed by May. But the reports of the White House drafting executive actions to do that haven’t gone away, and Trump didn’t do much to dispel them himself as he prepares for a phone call with Russian President Vladimir Putin on Saturday.

Ep. 38: Trump and GOP: The New Odd Couple
The Big Story

 

Ahead of the GOP retreat, CQ Roll Call's leadership editor Jason Dick and White House correspondent John Bennett provide insight into the awkward relationship developing between President Donald Trump and the Republicans who control Congress.

Trump and Schumer Begin the Battle of New York
Trent Lott sees similarities to his relationship with Clinton

New Yorkers pride themselves on being brash and tough, and that was obvious in the give and take on Inauguration Day between the newly minted 45th president of the United States, Donald Trump, and his chief antagonist, Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer.

And for at least one former Senate opposition leader, the back and forth between the two all seems quite familiar, and a good harbinger.

Inauguration Superlatives: The High Highs and Low Lows
Rhetoric, flubs, health and even conspirators can steal the spotlight

Under the best circumstances, a presidential inauguration can inspire a nation. Under the worst, it can lead to a do-over. And sometimes, not to be melodramatic, but dark forces conspire around it.

“With malice toward none, with charity for all, with firmness in the right as God gives us to see the right, let us strive on to finish the work we are in, to bind up the nation’s wounds, to care for him who shall have borne the battle and for his widow and his orphan, to do all which may achieve and cherish a just and lasting peace among ourselves and with all nations,” Abraham Lincoln said at his second inauguration, delivered to a country ripped apart by the Civil War.